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  • Walmart/Seiyu selling whale meat

    Do you think this is a problem?

    I think it`s a possible public relations disaster..

  • #2
    Why?

    Eating whale isn't considered wrong here. Just like some countries will eat dog, cat or monkey meat. It's a cultural thing. And Japan isn't the only country in the world that eats whale.

    The only public relation problem will be if they decide to export it to other countries that happen to think whales shouldn't be eaten.

    Comment


    • #3
      Walmart is not a Japanese store. It just owns Japanese stores. Like Seiyu.

      It`s an American company publically traded in the US... where eating whale would be only a little less abhorrent than eating Fido. Or Black Beauty. (Sentiment rules the stock markets!) I imagine there would be some backlash if stockholders found out the company was basically ignoring the whaling ban and slicing up `Willy`for Japanese markets. (Oh , no! We didn`t have anything to do with it! It was just our majority-owned subsidiary doing their own thing!) Just imagine if a US/UK company stocked monkey meat or bear paws for their African/ Chinese market. Anyhow, a moratorium is a moratorium.

      Other thoughts on whale meat:

      The whale meat here is a byproduct of `scientific studies`. OK, but what kind of studies? The simple kind, like `how many whales can we kill` or other types of experiments? Nobody`s saying. You still want to eat this stuff?

      Tiny packages of smelt are labelled with their origin here, as is salmon, halibut, crab, etc....

      Whale meat is just `kujira`. No type, never mind the origin. Weird.

      That`s all!

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm with you emotionally on this, but if the natives want to eat a bit of Skana, and aren't threatening the world stocks, wellll, I think it's called relativism. Live and let live. I know you know that.

        As for Wal-Mart experiencing problems because their Japanese stores sell something that uptight, self-righteous, priggishly F'witted Americans might object to, that would be just another nail in the coffin of the image of that fine but recently somewhat slow-witted and self-absorbed nation. Too many of the Good Ones don't care, and wouldn't do anything, and too many of the Wrong Ones are so used to getting their spoiled little ways as long as they scream and pout enough. It makes one wish our missiles pointed south. The technical term is extra-territoriality, the application of domestic laws and concerns outside of a given jurisdiction. It used to be a know know, until The Shrubbies decided that rather than finesse and intelligence, imitating the slow -witted, overgrown, retarded kid was a preferable way of solving international conflict and friction. Sad, really. I love American Food so much. Big Burgers. Yum. Pizza. Yum.
        Non sequitur
        Non sequitur
        Non sequitur

        Comment


        • #5
          Walmart may be American, but it's only truly American when it's in the US. Otherwise they will stock what the local populace wants and expects. If they want to stock whale meat it's because people want it and they'll make some money off of it.

          And if it got out that Wal Mart was in fact doing it, then I'm sure there would be some sort of horrified reaction back in the US, Greenpeace & PETA would demand that people ban Wal Mart because of it and Wal Mart wouldn't change things but might issue a press release to that effect. Besides, Japan (and Norway I believe) are able to hunt whales for several reasons. I believe the reasons had to do with their culture (they've been doing it for hundreds of years), they're limited to the number of whales they can hunt and most of them are classified as "scientific experiments". Okay, it sounds like a really transparent excuse but they've been able to make it stick.

          I'm also personally against the selling or consumption of whale, but in my case it's more cultural than anything else. And really when you get down to it, eating whale is no different than eating any other animal. We simply choose to ignore certain species because our "people" don't eat them, or for other reasons (personal, religious, social).

          Comment


          • #6
            Me Agree.

            The technical excuse is, in fact, for "the purposes of scientific reasearch". This, of course, is the basis for any legal problem with the meat being sold in stores, although the argument "waste not, want not" has been used to explain that apparent inconsistency.
            I'm with you, big guy. I find the meat fatty, and the idea icky, but I refuse to judge their practices based on my beliefs. As long as they can reasonably show that the catch is not a threat to world stocks. What they should do is refute the "scientific research" charade, and just come out and say : "We're killing 'em because we're eating them. Yum, Yum, MotherF&ckers". But, of course, Theirs is the Way of the Facile Excuse. And thats part of why we like them.

            PS Have you ever had it or been near it? I thought it stunk to high heaven. Very fatty, very YUK

            Comment


            • #7
              Didn't really feel like reading all the replies, but here's my thoughts.

              I don't eat whale, but I don't have a huge issue with others eating whale meat necessarily. The only problem is that whales aren't the most rapid breeding animals in the world, and it's very important that whale hunting is regulated, otherwise many species will be hunted to extinction, something which no one wants, but often animals are hunted to extinction unintentionally. Look at America and the Bison, no one wanted to cause them to become extinct, but it almost happened. I personally wouldn't mind human hunting. Soylent green, yum. No risk of extinction there.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yup. Except for the Human hunting bit.
                Know that famous quote, by a German theologian:
                First They Came for the Jews

                First they came for the Jews
                and I did not speak out
                because I was not a Jew.
                Then they came for the Communists
                and I did not speak out
                because I was not a Communist.
                Then they came for the trade unionists
                and I did not speak out
                because I was not a trade unionist.
                Then they came for me
                and there was no one left
                to speak out for me.
                Pastor Martin Niemöller

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by kurogane
                  Me Agree.

                  The technical excuse is, in fact, for "the purposes of scientific reasearch". This, of course, is the basis for any legal problem with the meat being sold in stores, although the argument "waste not, want not" has been used to explain that apparent inconsistency.
                  In a way I look at this as being just a loophole, but also in the same vein as the leather industry. You slaughter the cow, eat the meat, then use it's skin to make shoes, belts and jackets.
                  I'm with you, big guy. I find the meat fatty, and the idea icky, but I refuse to judge their practices based on my beliefs. As long as they can reasonably show that the catch is not a threat to world stocks. What they should do is refute the "scientific research" charade, and just come out and say : "We're killing 'em because we're eating them. Yum, Yum, MotherF&ckers". But, of course, Theirs is the Way of the Facile Excuse. And thats part of why we like them.

                  PS Have you ever had it or been near it? I thought it stunk to high heaven. Very fatty, very YUK
                  Nah, never been in a situation where it was or being served. Although I did see something in the local Seiyu and Belc the other day that really made me wonder what it was. It was in the fish section, but like no fish I had ever seen before. Of course I didn't recognise the kanji (no surprise there as I only recognise about 75 of them) so I couldn't figure it out. Maybe it was whale, or maybe just some strange fishy type thing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kurogane
                    Yup. Except for the Human hunting bit.
                    Know that famous quote, by a German theologian:
                    First They Came for the Jews
                    See Kurogane, that's assuming that the human hunting is biased. I'm an equal opportunity human hunter (which means that it's mostly the weak and old that will be caught, the way nature intended it.)

                    Seriously though, I think this will start to be more and more of a problem in general as the world's population increases. More and more types of foods will become 'luxury' food, there probably isn't enough whale to feed everyone that would want to eat it if it were legal. This, of course, leads to poaching, black market, etc., which is probably the second largest risk to many animals in modern times (next to habitat destruction.) I'm all for diversity of diet, but at the same time I wish more people were perfectly content with the abundant resouces of cow, chicken, sheep, and maybe such things as sparrows (recently had my first one). On another thought, has anyone eaten pigeon? Are they too diseased for any culture to eat?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We have enough food.

                      A word to the wise. Malthus' overpopulation theory of economics, is, for all practical purposes, discredited. The problem is not producing enough food to feed the world but the ordering of matters relating to food production and distribution.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by stillnosheep
                        A word to the wise. Malthus' overpopulation theory of economics, is, for all practical purposes, discredited. The problem is not producing enough food to feed the world but the ordering of matters relating to food production and distribution.
                        I'm not arguing that we don't have enough food, just that we don't have enough of certain luxury items. Cows, pigs, chickens, items that can be bred and grown, those we have enough of. Exotic animals are the problem, animals that people don't breed and slaughter, but just hunt. Read the post next time, and think before you post.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Talkin' about meat...

                          Originally posted by madmaxxam
                          On another thought, has anyone eaten pigeon? Are they too diseased for any culture to eat?
                          FYI, pigeon is eaten in various parts of the world. In fact, I've enjoyed hato stuffed with rice here in Tokyo.

                          Whale, incidentally, can be tasty if prepared well, but I hardly see it becoming a delicacy. In winter, I usually go to Kujiraya in Shibuya for kujira nabe. Really warms the ____les...

                          In the end, however, I find whales disappointing. I mean any creature with a _____ larger than an average-sized man should be able to put up more of a fight.
                          (I wonder if a whale with a 1.75 meter willy, which is pretty average for a whale, envies the really hung bulls? Food for thought...)
                          Last edited by sincity; 2004-09-22, 05:42 PM. Reason: henry miller flashback

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Pigeon

                            Wood-pigeon is exceedingly tasty, If a little strong.

                            It is best gutted, filleted and baked in pastry in a sauce made from its own gizzards with onions and mushrooms. Vegetables need to be strong tasting and good for mopping up the sauce; Mashed celeriac, mashed swede and mashed potatoes would be perfect, maybe with roast potatoes, roast turnip and brussel sprouts if it is a festive occasion.

                            Town pigeons are however very often disease ridden (and nowhere near as tasty) and as such best avoided.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by stillnosheep
                              Wood-pigeon is exceedingly tasty, If a little strong.

                              ...

                              Town pigeons are however very often disease ridden (and nowhere near as tasty) and as such best avoided.
                              I guess that's sort of what I figured. There's no way I would consider eating a pigeon if I thought it was caught in the center of Osaka, LA, NYC, Tokyo, etc., but if it's caught far out in nature so much it shouldn't be so bad. If they are serving it at a restaurant somewhere though, how can you know where it was caught? Is that type of thing well regulated in Japan, before I go off ordering Hato somewhere?

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