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Best Places to study abroad in Japan.

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  • Best Places to study abroad in Japan.

    I am looking for a good place to study the japanese culture. I have been looking at some language schools, and made a list. But I was curious of places that might be good for a student learning the language to study abroad at in Japan. I have been looking so far at Osaka, Kyoto and Kobe, but I want to hear from other peoples experience.
    So you have experience living in Kyoto or Kobe or experience studying in another city in Japan please tell me about it and the name of the language school.

  • #2
    There is a difference between learning the Japanese language, and the Japanese culture.

    If you come to Japan to learn the language, you are in school 5 days a week, 9am-4pm, and aren't going to have much/any time to do anything else. If you want to experience the culture I suggest doing a study abroad program either through your high school or university and selecting a home stay program.

    Either way, it would be up to you to decide which city's culture you want to experience. They will all be different, just like living in Miami, New York City, or Boise Idaho is all the "American experience" but that doesn't mean they're anything alike.

    Comment


    • #3
      so what your saying is japan is a melting pot like America? Are you actually comparing Japan to America. ok.

      Thanks. But I was actually askiing for peoples experience,. I'm actually looking to hear some stories sorry. If you have any experience living in the three cities I mention or have experience studying anywhere please do tell.

      I don't know what language school you were in but all of them I talk to have a 4 hour schedule, they even have them on their website, however there is the 3-5 hours of studying that accompanies those class room hours so yes studying at a language school would be a full-time job, if I was going full time.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Nolivas View Post
        so what your saying is japan is a melting pot like America? Are you actually comparing Japan to America. ok..
        NO!!!!!!!!!!! Japan not make okay melting pot, like. LOLzzzzzzz. Also is many, but always in one. This is what is Japan.





        At any rate, you should seriously consider learning English properly before taking on a difficult exotic language.

        This is true story!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kurogane View Post
          NO!!!!!!!!!!! Japan not make okay melting pot, like. LOLzzzzzzz. Also is many, but always in one. This is what is Japan.
          At any rate, you should seriously consider learning English properly before taking on a difficult exotic language.
          This is true story!
          Have a shot for me.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Nolivas View Post
            so what your saying is japan is a melting pot like America? Are you actually comparing Japan to America. ok.

            Thanks. But I was actually askiing for peoples experience,. I'm actually looking to hear some stories sorry. If you have any experience living in the three cities I mention or have experience studying anywhere please do tell.

            I don't know what language school you were in but all of them I talk to have a 4 hour schedule, they even have them on their website, however there is the 3-5 hours of studying that accompanies those class room hours so yes studying at a language school would be a full-time job, if I was going full time.
            Um, I am not saying that Japan is a melting pot. I am saying that your experience living in Japan will vary based on where you live (like any other country in the world....) and that if you want suggestions on where to study and where to get the best experience to suit your needs, you'd need to tell us more about what you'd like to experience. Even living in two large cities like Osaka and Tokyo would be very different (just like New York City and Los Angeles are different..) and of course smaller cities, or smaller islands like Hokkaido, Fukuoka, Okinawa, etc....all have their own flavors (and dialects, for that matter) as well.

            I was just trying to help you. But you have a serious attitude issue that you might want to work on before coming to Japan if you want to have a positive experience at all.

            As for the schedule...I'm guilty of just going off what the few Koreans I've met in Japan have told me. I mean, they have no life outside of their language school, but that could also be because they actually are here to learn and want to study. I don't know. 4 hours a day doesn't sound bad; again it really depends what you call "learning the Japanese culture".

            Kobe is a nice city, my best friend lived there for years and loved it. It's metropolitan enough to have everything you need but not as busy as Osaka. Of the three cities I'd consider Kobe the "most boring", it's just a regular medium-sized city with nothing to particularly set it apart.

            Osaka is a huge city with lots of little suburbs, I've been there a few times but not to live. There is a large difference in both demeanor and language (dialect) between Osaka/Kansai area and Tokyo/Kanto area. Realize that if you're trying to learn Japanese you want to learn standard Japanese first so studying in Osaka is fine but if you mix with the locals a lot you'll pick up mostly Kansaiben (the same is true in Kyoto and Kobe) which will not necessarily be useful to you on an academic level. Osaka has a large nightlife located mostly in an area called "Minami" as well as an American city which is very popular though I've never been there. Osaka will be the largest, busiest, and most varied culturally of the three cities you're looking into.

            Kyoto will be the more traditional and prettiest of the cities. It's touristy for sure, but I know people who have really enjoyed living and studying there. It's the smallest of the three cities you are considering, has many temples, street festivals, etc.

            Keep in mind that all three of these cities are within easy commuting distance so even if you pick one, you can often go visit the other 2.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by xHime View Post
              Osaka has a large nightlife located mostly in an area called "Minami" as well as an American city which is very popular though I've never been there. Osaka will be the largest, busiest, and most varied culturally of the three cities you're looking into.
              You are referring to America Mura which is a small part of Shinsaibashi. lots of live-house pubs and clubs and hip-hop clothing retailers there

              Kyoto will be the more traditional and prettiest of the cities. It's touristy for sure, but I know people who have really enjoyed living and studying there. It's the smallest of the three cities you are considering, has many temples, street festivals, etc.
              Kyoto is nice but foreigners there tend to be a bit snooty and stand-offish. If you can put up with that its OK.

              Lots of foreigners in Kobe too and Osaka has a pretty wild music and club scene.

              Kyoto and Kobe are within thirty minutes train ride of Osaka. Nara is also nice but very sleepy. Has a 1300 year old history.

              Usually language school students study up to 20 hours a week full time or minimum 4 hours a day. Some may offer more but thats what I'm told. It's pretty hard to take in more than 4 hours of language study at one sitting anyway.
              Last edited by KansaiBen; 2011-12-30, 09:08 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by kurogane View Post
                NO!!!!!!!!!!! Japan not make okay melting pot, like. LOLzzzzzzz. Also is many, but always in one. This is what is Japan.





                At any rate, you should seriously consider learning English properly before taking on a difficult exotic language.

                This is true story!
                I'm well aware the use of the word so in the opening of my sentence and it was not capitalize. Sue me, my fingers type fast and I get careless in an casual environment such as this one. I forget to capitalize one country on an internet forum and someone throws a big fit claiming I need to work on learning proper English. Big whoop, its an internet forum of course I'm gonna use slang and be careless and be casual. Kurogane please think before throwing stones at glass houses. Your sentence was not perfect either.
                Last edited by Nolivas; 2012-01-01, 09:37 AM. Reason: proper gramar

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by xHime View Post
                  Um, I am not saying that Japan is a melting pot. I am saying that your experience living in Japan will vary based on where you live (like any other country in the world....) and that if you want suggestions on where to study and where to get the best experience to suit your needs, you'd need to tell us more about what you'd like to experience. Even living in two large cities like Osaka and Tokyo would be very different (just like New York City and Los Angeles are different..) and of course smaller cities, or smaller islands like Hokkaido, Fukuoka, Okinawa, etc....all have their own flavors (and dialects, for that matter) as well.
                  Sorry I totally misunderstand, and was being sarcastic. I meant no harm, I should of put a jk or something. But anyhow thanks for your input man. It was a real big help. Thanks, and your right when you put it that way (difference of New york and Los Angeles, and other major Metropolitan cities.). Believe me I don't act this way when I'm in another country, only in my writing to other native english speakers do I come off as sarcastic.


                  Originally posted by xHime View Post
                  I was just trying to help you. But you have a serious attitude issue that you might want to work on before coming to Japan if you want to have a positive experience at all.
                  Last edited by Nolivas; 2012-01-01, 09:40 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Nolivas View Post
                    I'm well aware the use of the word so in the opening of my sentence and it was not capitalize. Sue me, my fingers type fast and I get careless in an casual environment such as this one. I forget to capitalize one country on an internet forum and someone throws a big fit claiming I need to work on learning proper English. Big whoop, its an internet forum of course I'm gonna use slang and be careless and be casual. Kurogane please think before throwing stones at glass houses. Your sentence was not perfect either.
                    Originally posted by xHime View Post
                    Um, I am not saying that Japan is a melting pot. I am saying that your experience living in Japan will vary based on where you live (like any other country in the world....) and that if you want suggestions on where to study and where to get the best experience to suit your needs, you'd need to tell us more about what you'd like to experience. Even living in two large cities like Osaka and Tokyo would be very different (just like New York City and Los Angeles are different..) and of course smaller cities, or smaller islands like Hokkaido, Fukuoka, Okinawa, etc....all have their own flavors (and dialects, for that matter) as well.

                    I was just trying to help you. But you have a serious attitude issue that you might want to work on before coming to Japan if you want to have a positive experience at all.

                    As for the schedule...I'm guilty of just going off what the few Koreans I've met in Japan have told me. I mean, they have no life outside of their language school, but that could also be because they actually are here to learn and want to study. I don't know. 4 hours a day doesn't sound bad; again it really depends what you call "learning the Japanese culture".

                    Kobe is a nice city, my best friend lived there for years and loved it. It's metropolitan enough to have everything you need but not as busy as Osaka. Of the three cities I'd consider Kobe the "most boring", it's just a regular medium-sized city with nothing to particularly set it apart.

                    Osaka is a huge city with lots of little suburbs, I've been there a few times but not to live. There is a large difference in both demeanor and language (dialect) between Osaka/Kansai area and Tokyo/Kanto area. Realize that if you're trying to learn Japanese you want to learn standard Japanese first so studying in Osaka is fine but if you mix with the locals a lot you'll pick up mostly Kansaiben (the same is true in Kyoto and Kobe) which will not necessarily be useful to you on an academic level. Osaka has a large nightlife located mostly in an area called "Minami" as well as an American city which is very popular though I've never been there. Osaka will be the largest, busiest, and most varied culturally of the three cities you're looking into.

                    Kyoto will be the more traditional and prettiest of the cities. It's touristy for sure, but I know people who have really enjoyed living and studying there. It's the smallest of the three cities you are considering, has many temples, street festivals, etc.

                    Keep in mind that all three of these cities are within easy commuting distance so even if you pick one, you can often go visit the other 2.
                    Minami hmmm. Sounds awesme, what you tell me about this American City I did not find anything about that on the internet.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's no problem. I don't take anything on Gaijinpot personally so no worries! Glad I could be of a little help. I will let Kansaiben tell you about America "mura", as I've never been there. Minami is the equivalent of Kabukicho in Tokyo, which is basically the host/hostess/club/night work district. Never been there either but know people who work there. Apparently they like it, but....probably not the only culture you'd want to experience.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Have a look here: http://gogonihon.com/
                        Is a free service that helps people to find a Japanese language school in Japan.

                        I hope it helps

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Study in Australia

                          Originally posted by Nolivas View Post
                          I am looking for a good place to study the japanese culture. I have been looking at some language schools, and made a list. But I was curious of places that might be good for a student learning the language to study abroad at in Japan. I have been looking so far at Osaka, Kyoto and Kobe, but I want to hear from other peoples experience.
                          So you have experience living in Kyoto or Kobe or experience studying in another city in Japan please tell me about it and the name of the language school.
                          may i know why

                          they can't speak english very well and first you have to understand the japanese language

                          Comment

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