Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Where can I get mineral oil in Tokyo? Or, walnut oil?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse



X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Where can I get mineral oil in Tokyo? Or, walnut oil?

    I was going to throw out an old thick wooden cutting board when a friend chastised me for being so stupid. Using a belt sander, he polished off the edges and surface until it looked and felt new.

    However, I remembered advice a long time ago about the importance of "conditioning" both cast-iron pans and wooden cutting boards. The latter with (food grade) mineral oil (is this the right kanji? 鉱物油 koubutsuyu? ) or walnut oil.

    Does anyone know where I can get some? What I don't want to do is make the mistake of buying something like oil for motors or machinery and rubbing into the cutting board.

  • #2
    Originally posted by NorthByNorthwest View Post
    I was going to throw out an old thick wooden cutting board when a friend chastised me for being so stupid. Using a belt sander, he polished off the edges and surface until it looked and felt new.

    However, I remembered advice a long time ago about the importance of "conditioning" both cast-iron pans and wooden cutting boards. The latter with (food grade) mineral oil (is this the right kanji? 鉱物油 koubutsuyu? ) or walnut oil.

    Does anyone know where I can get some? What I don't want to do is make the mistake of buying something like oil for motors or machinery and rubbing into the cutting board.
    Just an idea here - no experience at this at all - but how about using olive oil? You might heat it to essentially thin it, so it might soak in better.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by TJrandom View Post
      Just an idea here - no experience at this at all - but how about using olive oil? You might heat it to essentially thin it, so it might soak in better.
      Unfortunately not... cos eventually it and any other oils turn rancid and make the food taste funny.


      http://forum.gaijinpot.com/showthrea...hlight=mineral
      Last edited by twelvedown; 2012-03-21, 10:14 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        マイ アヅヴィス ワズ ベスト。
        ビカズ、 アイ イズ ソウ スマート!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by twelvedown View Post
          Unfortunately not... cos eventually it and any other oils turn rancid and make the food taste funny.


          http://forum.gaijinpot.com/showthrea...hlight=mineral
          So, where did you end up finding it?

          Comment


          • #6
            Several years back I remember seeing walnut oil for sale in Valour of all places.

            Comment


            • #7
              OK - so scratch olive oil... but, if you can't find the oil you want, how about just using walnut meat? COSCO sells a pound or more bag of the nut meat, and if rubbed on the board - surely the oil and other juices would adhere and maybe penetrate.... and you could still eat the now crushed nuts - maybe in cookies, or with breakfast cereal.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SometimesJustMe View Post
                Several years back I remember seeing walnut oil for sale in Valour of all places.
                I think that might be easier than finding mineral oil. I also think I saw some walnut oil in a nearby Seijo Ishii supermarket.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by NorthByNorthwest View Post
                  I think that might be easier than finding mineral oil. I also think I saw some walnut oil in a nearby Seijo Ishii supermarket.

                  This was the one I saw at Valour (4th priced item from the top: http://item.rakuten.co.jp/uenoohtsuya/772905/#772905 )

                  Though this one looks a little more "real" to me. http://item.rakuten.co.jp/food-fiesta/119775/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SometimesJustMe View Post
                    This was the one I saw at Valour (4th priced item from the top: http://item.rakuten.co.jp/uenoohtsuya/772905/#772905 )

                    Though this one looks a little more "real" to me. http://item.rakuten.co.jp/food-fiesta/119775/
                    Thanks! The brand in the first link is what I recall seeing in the SeijoIshii supermarket (along with the peanut, almond & hazelnut oils). Y840 a pop sounds a lot better than having to shell out Y3200, so I'll go for the first option.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by NorthByNorthwest View Post
                      Thanks! The brand in the first link is what I recall seeing in the SeijoIshii supermarket (along with the peanut, almond & hazelnut oils). Y840 a pop sounds a lot better than having to shell out Y3200, so I'll go for the first option.
                      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...8191706AAKVDYm

                      big debate on this at yahoo answers.

                      Mineral oil is made from petroleum distillates and does not belong in the body. that is why it is a very, very effective laxitive! You might as well use vaseline on your cutting board! Baby Oil is mineral oil with vanillin scent. -- another cheap alternative.

                      I like the idea of using safflower oil.

                      but.. I think this oiling step is used to waterproof the board -- to cut down on micro growth on the surface, if you are using the board for hacking raw meats and fish. Bleach, soap, lemon juice, vinegar, sunlight will all take care of that... in addtion to the occassional belt sander. Hard woods are more resistant than soft woods

                      If you use the board with care and frequently clean it, you should not have any problems bacteria, hence no need for the oil step.


                      did you look at Tokyu Hands in their kitchen tools section???
                      Last edited by well_bicyclically; 2012-03-22, 12:13 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by NorthByNorthwest View Post
                        I was going to throw out an old thick wooden cutting board when a friend chastised me for being so stupid. Using a belt sander, he polished off the edges and surface until it looked and felt new.

                        However, I remembered advice a long time ago about the importance of "conditioning" both cast-iron pans and wooden cutting boards. The latter with (food grade) mineral oil (is this the right kanji? 鉱物油 koubutsuyu? ) or walnut oil.

                        Does anyone know where I can get some? What I don't want to do is make the mistake of buying something like oil for motors or machinery and rubbing into the cutting board.
                        You definitely want to use mineral oil, do not use olive oil. You can also use beeswax or a combination treatment which will be beeswax and mineral oil. Easiest place to get mineral oil is the pharmacy in the baby section. I have purchased mineral oil, but some labeled baby oil are not mineral oil so you will need someone who can read the Japanese to make sure it is in fact mineral oil. I bought a pretty large bottle for $7, I think it was johnson and johnson brand.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Okay - I ended up going with the walnut oil. I bought a small bottle of it from the 24 H Seijo Ishii in my office building:



                          It was easy to apply onto the board and the excess wiped away cleanly. The (good) funny thing that I did not expect was that my hands did not end up greasy as I expected. It absorbed nicely and no funky oily smell.

                          Did some reading up on it, and apparently it's good to use in salad dressings etc. (eaten cold - not heated) as it's high in Omega-3 oil. Since an opened bottle is supposed to remain 'good' for six to eight months, I'm going to put it to good use in the kitchen.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by NorthByNorthwest View Post
                            Okay - I ended up going with the walnut oil. I bought a small bottle of it from the 24 H Seijo Ishii in my office building:



                            It was easy to apply onto the board and the excess wiped away cleanly. The (good) funny thing that I did not expect was that my hands did not end up greasy as I expected. It absorbed nicely and no funky oily smell.

                            Did some reading up on it, and apparently it's good to use in salad dressings etc. (eaten cold - not heated) as it's high in Omega-3 oil. Since an opened bottle is supposed to remain 'good' for six to eight months, I'm going to put it to good use in the kitchen.
                            But will it not become rancid after being in the board a while?
                            Anyway..with my awesome board I lost interest in oiling it
                            I spoke to a few housewives about oiling it and they were like 'huh?'
                            They probably just turf them out... or...Japanese boards are made from wood you don't need to oil.
                            Anyway, hell, my food's so good I could cut it up on a whale corpse and it'd still be tasty.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by twelvedown View Post
                              But will it not become rancid after being in the board a while?
                              Anyway..with my awesome board I lost interest in oiling it
                              I spoke to a few housewives about oiling it and they were like 'huh?'
                              They probably just turf them out... or...Japanese boards are made from wood you don't need to oil.
                              Anyway, hell, my food's so good I could cut it up on a whale corpse and it'd still be tasty.
                              I guess it's an issue but apparently walnut oil is hardier than other vegetable oils. Maybe coconut oil would have been even better according to this article.

                              I was actually going to throw the board away as it had gotten old and funky. However by sanding it down to a new surface, I got a virtually brand new board. The only problem was that the newly exposed surface meant it would be highly porous and that's why seasoning it with oil was important.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X