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The Diary of General Hideki Tojo !

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  • The Diary of General Hideki Tojo !

    Tojo, aware that Japan was unable to win the war, resigned from office after the loss of Saipan in July 1944. He shot himself in the chest just before he was arrested by the US Military in 1945. Tojo survived and after being nursed back to health was tried as a war criminal. Hideki Tojo was executed on 23rd December 1948. This date is will in the hearts and minds of people like McTojo for a long time to come.
    It's important that people realize that General Tojo had all of the right intentions ! Please don't paint this guy as a cold blooded murderer . Give him a chance ! Don't let China feed you this US agianst Yasukuni or McTojo issue.
    The dairy:


    Immediately before the beginning of the Great East Asian War (Second World War), Japan was still engaged in the unfortunate Sino-Japanese War, which had already gone on for more than four years. Throughout that period, Japan had made honest efforts to keep the destruction of war from spreading and, based on the belief that all nations of the world should find their places, had followed a policy designed to restore an expeditious peace between Japan and China. Japan was ensuring the stability of East Asia while contributing to world peace. Nevertheless, China was unfortunately unable to understand Japan's real position, and it is greatly to be regretted that the Sino-Japanese War became one of long duration.

    Clearly, this Sino-Japanese War of more than four years was a considerable burden on Japan's national power and an obstacle to the maintenance of peace in the Pacific. From the point of the view of the nation's power, it was obvious that while we were fighting the Sino-Japanese war, every effort was to be made to avoid adding to our enemies and opening additional fronts. Naturally, this was the view of those who then held positions of responsibility.

    In the past, the theory had been: advance towards the north while defending the south, or advance to the south while defending the north. However, as the Sino-Japanese War dragged on, the only objectives that bore consideration were: (1) a swift peace between Japan and China; (2) the maintenance of international peace; and (3) the restoration of national power.

    It was for this reason that Japan: (1) attempted to establish peace with China through negotiations, sometimes through American mediation; (2) strengthened the Russo-Japanese Neutrality Treaty [April 1941] in the hope of avoiding war with the Soviet Union; and (3) tried as much as possible to use diplomatic means to respond to signs that relations with the United States were worsening, even though in so doing it was necessary for Japan to endure things that were unendurable.

    Despite Japan's desires and efforts, unfortunate differences in the ways that Japan, England, the United States, and China understood circumstances, together with misunderstandings of attitudes, made it impossible for the parties to agree. Up until the very end, these were important reasons for the outbreak of war, and from Japan's point of view, this is a matter of great regret.

    In dealing with the China problem, the British and American side, which had particularly strong interests in China, should have based its judgments about the origins of the problem on direct observation of the actual circumstances at the time. Moreover, both sides should have considered the point of view and survival of the one billion people of East Asia, who were awakening to world development. Rather than be trapped in the narrow-minded maintenance of old power structures, it was necessary that both sides deliberate together, work harmoniously, and take a broader view of mutual prosperity, cooperation, and the establishment of stability in East Asia.



    (2) Cordell Hull wrote about negotiations with the Hideki Tojo government in 1941.

    Little good as we had had to expect from the Konoye Cabinet we had even less to expect from the Cabinet headed by Premier General Hideki Tojo after October 17. Tojo, who had been Minister of War, continued even as Premier to be an active Army officer. He was a typical Japanese officer, with a small-bore, straight-laced, one-track mind. He was stubborn and self-willed, rather stupid, hard-working, and possessed a quantity of drive.

    The new Foreign Minister, Shigenori Togo, was a typical Japanese Foreign Office official, a good technician in his craft but also rather narrow in his views and unable to gain a broad perspective.

    The new Cabinet almost immediately stated to us with emphasis, through Togo in Tokyo and Nomura in Washington, that they wanted to continue conversations with us and reach an agreement for peace in the
    Pacific. They sought to impress upon us that they supported the assurances of peaceful intentions so often conveyed to us by the Konoye Cabinet.

    This was on the surface, of course. Other developments were ominous. Japanese military movements continued in Manchuria and Indo-China. The anti-American campaign went on in the Nipponese press. Navy and Army officers made inflammatory speeches. The director of the naval intelligence section of Imperial Headquarters said in a public address, "The Imperial Navy is itching for action, when needed." And Ambassador Grew cabled me on October 25 information from a reliable informant that it was only as a result of pressure from the Emperor that the Tojo Cabinet became committed to an attempt to conclude the conversations with us successfully.





    (3) In his prison diary Hideki Tojo explained why Japan decided to attack Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941.

    The main American naval forces were shifted to the Pacific region and an American admiral made a strong declaration to the effect that if war were to break out between Japan and the United States, the Japanese navy could be sunk in a matter of weeks. Further, the British Prime Minister (Churchill) strongly declared his nation's intention to join the fight on the side of the United States within 24 hours should war break out between Japan and the United States. Japan therefore faced considerable military threats as well.

    Japan attempted to circumvent these dangerous circumstances by diplomatic negotiation, and though Japan heaped concession upon concession, in the hope of finding a solution through mutual compromise, there was no progress because the United States would not retreat from its original position. Finally, in the end, the United States repeated demands that, under the circumstances, Japan could not accept: complete withdrawal of troops from China, repudiation of the Nanking government, withdrawal from the Tripartite Pact (signed by Germany, Italy and Japan on September 27, 1940). At this point, Japan lost all hope of reaching a resolution through diplomatic negotiation.

    Since events had progressed as they had, it became clear that to continue in this manner was to lead the nation to disaster. With options thus foreclosed, in order to protect and defend the nation and clear the obstacles that stood in its path, a decisive appeal to arms was made.

    War was decided upon at the Imperial Conference on December 1, 1941, and the shift to real operations was made at this point. However, even during the preparations for action, we laid our plans in such a manner that should there be progress through diplomatic negotiation, we would be well prepared to cancel operations at the latest moment that communication technology would have permitted.



    (4) Hideki Tojo attempted to defend himself against the accusation of war crimes.

    1. I deny that Japan "declared war on civilization."

    2. To advocate a New Order was to seek freedom and respect for peoples without prejudice, and to seek a stable basis for the existence all peoples, equally, and free of threats. Thus, it was to seek true civilization and true justice for all the peoples of the world, and to view this as the destruction of personal freedom and respect is to be assailed by the hatred and emotion of war, and to make hasty judgments.

    3. I would like to point out their (my accusers') inhumane and uncivilized actions in East Asia ever since the Middle Ages.

    4. In the shadow of the prosperity of Europe and America, the colored peoples of East Asia and Africa have been sacrificed and forced into a state of semi-colonization. I would point out that the cultural advance of these people has been suppressed in the past and continues to be suppressed in the present by policies designed to keep them in ignorance.

    5. I would point out that Japan's proposal at the Versailles Peace Conference on the principle of racial equality was rejected by delegates such as those from Britain and the United States.

    6. Of two through five above, which is civilization? Which is international justice? Justice has nothing to do with victor nations and vanquished nations, but must be a moral standard that all the world's peoples can agree to. To seek this and to achieve it - that is true civilization.

    7. In order to understand this, all nations must hate war, forsake emotion, reflect upon their pasts, and think calmly

    written in 45'

  • #2
    You would think that someone who was a general would at least know enough about guns to kill himself properly. Perhaps it was just a cry for help. (Is there a term for that in Samurai culture - like when they only half disembowel themselves?)

    Comment


    • #3
      How Tojo lost the War

      I think that. Hideki Tojo was the problem not the answer. Most people in the U.S., British, and Allie force recognized the Imperil Navy as one of honor and strong will. Isoroku Yamamotos was a brilliant thinker and did thing very different then other Admirals in the War. This kept him one step ahead of the allied in the Pacific. He well train sailor he graduated from the Japanese Naval Academy in 1904, he served in the Russo-Japanese War. Yamamoto was also well-educated man. He attended the Naval War College during the and later studied at Harvard University. As a Captain, he served as Naval Attaché to the United States in 1925-28. In the late 1920s and during the 1930s, he held a number of important positions, many of them involved with Japanese naval aviation.
      Yamamoto was personal again Japan attacking the U.S. Navy wishes that Pear Harbor. Yamamoto believed that the war the Pacific could be won, but only if the U.S. was kept out. He believe that if the was attacked and the U.S. forced went to war with Japan it would spread the Imperil Navy to thin.
      Most WW 2 experts believe that Japan would be left alone if they did not attack Pear Harbor. FDR true interest in the War was that of Germany. The U.S. people want to stay neutral and would have never let the government enter the war without Pear Harbor. Many histories believe that FDR know about the attack and when was warned took no defense talk to get involved in the war. The day after Pear Harbor the U.S. declared war on Japan and Germany. The U.S. only used 20% of it force to fight the war in Asia. FDR and the U.S. military had more of an interest in Germany. The actual atomic bomb was design to drop on Berlin Not Japan. With this being said, Tojo beigest mistake was to go again his Admirals wish and attack the U.S.. In attacking the U.S. Tojo spread his force to thin and lost the war. In addition, Tojo micromanaged the Imperil Naval and Army. As for the Allies with Russia and German these were set up to prevent fighting a war on two fronts. One with Europe and the other in the Pacific.

      Comment


      • #4
        My personal though entirely untrustworthy opinion, is FDR knew full well of the planned attack at Pearl Harbour, as did Churchill. It was all over oil being included on a trade trariff against Japan concerning the war in China, that some have said since to be a mistake (a mistake? Pretty big f*&king mistake). FDR and Churhill agreed pretty quick on the "Germany first" policy with Stalin. Basically FDR wanted to go to war but the isolationist American public wouldn't without a decent "rallying cry".

        Now Im not excusing Japan or Germany (my Granddad would hate me for it) but anyone who thinks Pearl Harbour was an accident or unprovoced attack is missing a lot of strange "coinindences" that happened beofre the attack. Just the tip of the iceberg, the the Japanese were spotted at least 3-4 times before the attack. Yet the alarm was never raised. And I find it hard to believe a whole fleet could have made it way to Hawaii (including 3-4 carriers) with no warning at all, from spies, recon planes, fishermen, anything.

        Yamamoto was one of the great military minds of the 20th century, people fail to realize that. He was against attacking Pearl Harbour because he knew exactly what FDR and Churhill knew. Japan would be lured in a World War and would ultimaitly lose.

        Am I saying Japan was the victim? Not quite. But I do think things were not as simple or beign (on the Aliies part) as the "accepted" history books make them out to be.

        Comment


        • #5
          The REAL Criminals

          The real criminals (disreguarding Hitler) were off Scott-free and worshipped as heroes who saved the world while they really enslaved it. My heart weeps for the state of Japan! I have not historicly been a big General Tojo fan, but If I could travel through time, I would be happy to saddle up in a Zero and give the Devil's race a peice of my mind. I do think he may have been the most honorable leader from WWII. Everyone was in that war for what THEY COULD GET, but TOjo was likely less corrupt. IF you disagree, I will present my case soon.

          One fantasy of mine is to time travel back, steal a nuke and load it into a unmanned version of the MXY-7 and drop it off a Betty at 36,000 ft over the High Capitol of Hell. The glider would circle around over the city, giving me and my Betty time to get away from the blast. MAybe I could fire the rocket engines 100 miles out and then have it glide in. The world's first nuclear cruise missile...

          I won't stop the Japanese nationalistic, militaristic raving! If someone doesn't liek that, I'm sorry. It's part of me. I've wept bitterly for JApan's suffering and begged God for vengeance almost every night and day fo rthe past 10 years. IT is likely that will continue until I cease to exist.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by kimonolover
            I won't stop the Japanese nationalistic, militaristic raving! If someone doesn't liek that, I'm sorry.
            Hey don't apologise-I think its hilarious. Watching you rant with affected impotent rage online is a never-ending source of amusement.

            Act like a clown, you'll get treated like one.

            Comment


            • #7
              Oh please, enough of this long drawn out courtship. Kimomolover, macalpine, you are made for each other as are no others on this planet ('cept perhaps Osama and GWB). Fly across to South Carolina and enjoy making the soft seaweed at the not so pink temples till the end of both your days like good little boys now and spare us the fascist fantasies. Thanx.

              Comment


              • #8
                Fdr Knew

                Jay,Jay
                Great posting. I totally agree with your view. I always found that it was interesting that the Aircraft Carries and the New Ships were out on maneuvers on the day
                Pear Harbor was attacked. Most of all the ships at Pear Harbor at the time of the attack were WWI ships. In addition, all but, four ships were repaired and brought back into the U.S. Fleet. I also find it interesting that the warning given by the Japanese that they were going to attack the U.S. was sent stander telegram not fast military telegram that would have taken a one tenth of the time and would have gone directly to the base instead multi level Western Union system.

                As for Yamamoto, I did and will never respect the Japanese Army, but as ex U.S. Navy vet. I would in a heart beat server with him or under his Yamamoto Command. He was a well-educated man. He also had greatly respect for his men. Many sailors call him the Admiral for the common sailor. He was well respect among U.S. Diplomats and by the Allies. I believed if Yamamoto were either premier or secretary of defense the war would have ended drastically different for Japan.

                As I have mention before my father who ship was sunk twice by the Japanese had great respect for the Impearl Navy. In addition, to my father being a Navy Vet. he was also a history professor at a major state university. To my surprise when I ask my father what he thought of FDR knowing of the attack on Pear Harbor, he said without a doubt he know of it. He also believed FDR knew of the coming attack on the Philippians.

                Cali

                Comment


                • #9
                  What type of person was Tojo?

                  Ok, McTojo,

                  I was going to go at you for Tojo domestic policy, but I changed my mind. Instead, I will say this first. Many famous leaders take the blame for what their government has done. Others surrounded themselves with people they think will make them great and take credit for those people action around them. In short famous people like FDR, JFK, Nixon, Reagan, and Clinton are often blame or take credit for things that they had very little to do with. I would say what makes a great leader sometime is not the individual, but who he or she has work for them. Now knowing this I would like to know about Tojo the person. I know a lot about his government, but how much is that him and how much is it the people around him. So here is my challenge for McTojo and anyone else on the opposite side. I would like to know more information about Tojo. Please tell me about article or website I could fined out about Tojo. Know be one who lived in China, I know the propaganda and truth that is said about the Impearl Japanese. I also know the brain washing of kids and adult alike. So please donft tell me the propaganda on either sides. My objective here is to find out what Tojo did or didnft do. So let see what you all have to say on both side with hard evidence. After I look over all the information I will return with my view and why. McTojo I do not always agree with you, but I respect your views. I believe that you are an intelligent person with strong views and well-formed opinions. Cali

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Let's Get R Done

                    Cali,

                    I was originally planning on launching a full-scale assault on your position and your grammar and spelling issues. However, that last post was really a wicked move! If this was an online battle game, you would have just outflanked McTojo and I here. I didn't think you would do that. I will say this one little jab. I have much great respect fo rthe Japanese Imperial Navy and very little for the US NAvy and other forces. They only won because like the forces of Mordor, they had great numbers and seemingly inexhaustable resources to expend. However, unfortunately, unlike the fiction books I cite frequently, here in the real world, the bad guys win.

                    McTojo,

                    It rocks that you got this info on Tojo! I know little about him myself and have until yesterday, assumed he was what he was described to me as by people like my dad. I would have still fought under his command rather than that of FDR or Truman. Even if he was as corrupt as the machine makes him out to be, he was more honest and had a greater sense of honor and duty than FDR and Truman by a long shot!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kimonolover

                      Originally posted by kimonolover
                      Cali,

                      I was originally planning on launching a full-scale assault on your position and your grammar and spelling issues. However, that last post was really a wicked move! If this was an online battle game, you would have just outflanked McTojo and I here. I didn't think you would do that. I will say this one little jab. I have much great respect fo rthe Japanese Imperial Navy and very little for the US NAvy and other forces. They only won because like the forces of Mordor, they had great numbers and seemingly inexhaustable resources to expend. However, unfortunately, unlike the fiction books I cite frequently, here in the real world, the bad guys win.

                      McTojo,

                      It rocks that you got this info on Tojo! I know little about him myself and have until yesterday, assumed he was what he was described to me as by people like my dad. I would have still fought under his command rather than that of FDR or Truman. Even if he was as corrupt as the machine makes him out to be, he was more honest and had a greater sense of honor and duty than FDR and Truman by a long shot!
                      Yes, I agree with you entirely Col. Kimonolover ! I think you are pretty amazing too ! I'm all for honor and dignity ! Serving under the emperor is an honourable thing ! We need to attack these wayward Gaypotter...ooopps...Gaijinpotters for the wayward beliefs and wayward acts, and their wayward disregard for his majesty !

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by california84
                        Ok, McTojo,

                        I was going to go at you for Tojo domestic policy, but I changed my mind. Instead, I will say this first. Many famous leaders take the blame for what their government has done. Others surrounded themselves with people they think will make them great and take credit for those people action around them. In short famous people like FDR, JFK, Nixon, Reagan, and Clinton are often blame or take credit for things that they had very little to do with. I would say what makes a great leader sometime is not the individual, but who he or she has work for them. Now knowing this I would like to know about Tojo the person. I know a lot about his government, but how much is that him and how much is it the people around him. So here is my challenge for McTojo and anyone else on the opposite side. I would like to know more information about Tojo. Please tell me about article or website I could fined out about Tojo. Know be one who lived in China, I know the propaganda and truth that is said about the Impearl Japanese. I also know the brain washing of kids and adult alike. So please donft tell me the propaganda on either sides. My objective here is to find out what Tojo did or didnft do. So let see what you all have to say on both side with hard evidence. After I look over all the information I will return with my view and why. McTojo I do not always agree with you, but I respect your views. I believe that you are an intelligent person with strong views and well-formed opinions. Cali
                        I will provide a paper trail of evidence to prove that Tojo was a real person.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks

                          Thank You For Your Help

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            First half of the intro to the man who saved Japan

                            April 22, 1999
                            A Tojo Battles History, for Grandpa and for Japan
                            By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
                            TOKYO -- Yuko Tojo stiffens in her chair as she recalls how her beloved grandpa vanished at the end of World War II and her mother eventually told her that he had been killed on the battlefield.

                            Hideki Tojo was hanged as a war criminal, but was he a great Japanese patriot?

                            Then, when she was in the fifth-grade, she moved to Tokyo from the remote village where she had been sheltered during the war and its aftermath, and the other children teased her by making faces as if they were being strangled. She did not understand, and her mother would not explain.

                            She heard the mysterious word "koshukei" whispered about her grandfather, and so finally she looked up the word in a picture dictionary. It meant "to be hanged to death," and the dictionary included a picture of a man in a black hood being hanged from a gallows. Suddenly everything became clear.

                            Now, 50 years after a U.S.-backed tribunal hanged her grandfather, Hideki Tojo, as a war criminal -- he was Japan's wartime prime minister and the man who ordered the attack on Pearl Harbor -- Mrs. Tojo is leading a campaign to revise his image. In just a few years, she has been remarkably successful in winning a measure of public support in Japan for her portrayal of Tojo as a national hero.

                            "He died for his country," she said firmly in an interview in the building where she keeps an office to fight for his memory. "He died to save his people."

                            Mrs. Tojo, 59, spoke on the sofas in the lobby of the building, steadfastly refusing repeated suggestions that her office might be more interesting for an interview, and she was accompanied by a burly man, her aide, who towered over her but ran about on her instructions to fetch tea and newspaper clippings.

                            Mrs. Tojo's campaign is part of a larger struggle by Japanese conservatives to change the way Japan perceives its past, so that children can feel pride rather than shame for what their grandparents and great-grandparents did in the war.

                            The issues are extremely sensitive both within Japan and among neighboring countries -- where millions died during Japan's invasions and brutal occupations -- but there is little doubt that it is becoming more acceptable than ever before to say openly in Japan that Tojo was a great man or that Japan had no choice but to attack Pearl Harbor.

                            "This isn't a private matter about my grandpa," Mrs. Tojo said, somehow managing to speak both primly and passionately. "To improve the image of Tojo is to improve the image of wartime Japan, and that's my aim."

                            Mrs. Tojo first stepped into the limelight a few years ago, writing a book about her grandfather that became a best seller, with 100,000 copies sold. Then there was a movie, "Pride," which portrayed Tojo as a gentle hero and was the highest-grossing Japanese movie in the first half of last year.

                            Another sign of the growing assertiveness of the revisionist movement was the huge success of an adult comic book, Sensoron, which came out last year and has sold 550,000 copies so far. It portrays Tojo as trying "to protect the honor of Japan" and argues that the root cause of World War II was that white people were colonizing Asia and that the United States was provoking Japan.

                            "Some Asian country had to stand up against Western white imperialism," the book declares. "And Japan did."

                            Just this month, Tokyo voters elected as their new governor Shintaro Ishihara, an outspoken nationalist who has denounced as "a lie" the Rape of Nanking -- an assault on the Chinese city by Japanese troops in 1937 in which, most historians believe, tens of thousands died.

                            "With the United States occupation after the war, there was mind control over the Japanese people about their history, and only now is the mind control being lifted." Mrs. Tojo said. "Now is the first time that many people are learning the real history of Japan."

                            Leaning forward in her chair, putting down her canned tea, Mrs. Tojo suddenly grew even more intense.

                            "People always talk about Hitler and Tojo in the same breath," she said fervently. "But they were utterly different. Hitler murdered the Jews, but Tojo didn't kill his own people.

                            "Japan was encircled by hostile nations before the war, and it was strangled by sanctions and had no resources," she added. "So General Tojo, for the sake of the survival of his people, had to resort to arms."

                            This interpretation of history does not find many followers elsewhere in Asia, and some Chinese and Koreans worry that Japanese denials of wartime atrocities mean that the country is likely to become more militaristic and belligerent in the coming decades.

                            But Yasuaki Onuma, a law professor and leader in the efforts to get Japan to atone for wartime atrocities, said that while right-wing historical revisionists like Mrs. Tojo are becoming more outspoken and visible, fundamentally that is because they are losing ground.

                            Onuma noted that in recent years the Japanese government has apologized more openly than ever for wartime misconduct and has acknowledged some brutalities in recent editions of school textbooks.

                            "These changes have frustrated right-wing people," Onuma said. "They feel desperate, and so they have become more vocal."

                            Mrs. Tojo comes across in conversation as a staunch nationalist, but not as particularly anti-American. Indeed, she recently returned from a trip to the United States, where she visited Pearl Harbor to pay her respects to those killed in the 1941 attack. She also dropped off her daughter, who is now studying English in Seattle.

                            It might seem odd for General Tojo's great-granddaughter to be studying in the country that he attacked. But Mrs. Tojo says that the general's dying wish, expressed in writings to his family members, was to have reconciliation among the wartime enemies and some kind of joint memorial service.

                            For now, Mrs. Tojo is planning to continue her campaign to restore her grandfather's image by building several memorial halls that would portray the truth of the war as she sees it. She says her campaign is inspired by her mother's counsel when Mrs. Tojo was a girl and no one would play with her because of her family name.

                            "When we were constantly persecuted, Mom always insisted to us that grandpa had died for his country," Mrs. Tojo recalled, pausing with a wistful smile. "She used to say, 'Be brave and be proud!' "

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              "People always talk about Hitler and Tojo in the same breath," she said fervently. "But they were utterly different. Hitler murdered the Jews, but Tojo didn't kill his own people.

                              Goodness me , check out the big brain on Mrs Tojo. She certainly has a handle on this whole war criminal thingy.

                              Comment

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