Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

What the Japanese tell us about earthquake safety

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse



X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What the Japanese tell us about earthquake safety

    It's all been a bit busy on the disaster side of late. Typhoons, volcanic eruptions, and a number of earthquakes in the Kansai region.

    So, what are you supposed to do in the event of an earthquake? My students tell me that they are instructed at school to get under the table. Others have said i should run out of the building to the nearest emergency muster point/ground. Maybe stand under the door frame?

    As foreigners here, we aren't officially told anything, and being from an earthquake free country, I for one would like to know. There seems to be a lot of confusion, so i did a bit of searching and this is what i found.

    Check out this site: http://www.amerrescue.org/arti_survivalarticle.htm as it totally contradicts what i have heard from many Japanese!

  • #2
    i have always understood that the first thing to do is run and unlock and open the front door. the second thing is turn off the gas......then i look for someplace safe to stand - but by then it is usually over!!!

    incidentally, i have never seen anyone get under a table or desk. interesting link mr bb.

    Comment


    • #3
      I prefer to immeditaley put on my trousers, and then hop around screaming quietly: "Holy F&CK, I hate Earthquakes!"As Ananda said, and one more thing: stand in a doorframe (the structurally strongest part of a room)

      Comment


      • #4
        I would say it depends on the circumstances. A word of advice would be that if there is a quake at nightime and afterwards you are going to bed, keep a pair of slippers or shoes nearby. Quakes crack glass which can be terrible on your tootsies !
        As far as where to go, the best place would probably be outside in a field... failing that a doorframe or heavy deak might do the trick. Having lived in california for a number of years prior to coming to japan I can say that any quake-movement over say, 10 seconds, qualifies as a long one and if you haven't sought any shelter from falling things you should at that point.
        Its a good excuse to hug your loved one or the nearest student

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by donpaulo
          Its a good excuse to hug your loved one or the nearest student
          Now THERE's a good excuse to just out and hug a student in the middle of a class! "Oh, sorry! I thought that was an earthquake just now and we were going to die. Sorry... Was it good for you? Great! Here's my number!"

          Originally posted by donpaulo
          I would say it depends on the circumstances.
          Exactly. What kind of building do you live in (are you in at time of earthquake)? What floor? Anything under 10 seconds is not likely going to cause you to have to take cover. But that 10 seconds is your time to find cover. If it stops, great. If it doesn't stop, you want to be somewhere safe.

          And remember - shutting off the gas doesn't mean pushing the button to make the gas unit turn off. You have to go to the gas meter and turn the switch. Most meters in Japan are behind unlocked doors next to your entrance door.

          If the big one hits - and you survive (sorry) stay calm and think about your priorities. Food, water and shelter. Be concerned with forces (natural and human) that would deprive you of these things.

          I've lived on the pacific rim of fire all my life but fortunately have not had to go through a major earthquake. I was here for the Kobe quake in 1995, but far away enough that it was just a jostler for me. The recent quakes have been disturbing, however, considering the frequency.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the link

            Thanks for the link!

            Best quote from it is:

            After seeing victims under columns and carrying beams, I was finally convinced that the human body is 70 percent water.

            Comment


            • #7
              Laterthanyou: nice one, i missed that line!

              Regarding door frames, it does say somewhere on that sight that it's a big no no to stand under a door frame, as if the building moves side ways and the frame loosens also, the previously supported mass will crush you like a ____roach gets squished by the weight of my boot.

              Comment


              • #8
                Maybe they mean to say, don't stand under a *Japanese* door frame. I was under the impression that door frames were a good choice - having seen quite a few made during construction. Again, I guess it really depends on the coffin, er, building you are in when the big one hits.

                Comment


                • #9
                  yeh you're right there, i wouldn't fancy my chances under any door frame in my building. The construction of modern houses here is of appallingly poor standards compared to Europe/US/Aus with regard to quality materials, heat/cold/moisture insulation, lack of double glazing, horrendous gas safety standards, and stoneage kitchen designs, but these old japanese houses seem surprisingly flexible when it comes to quakes. I would imagine in Europe where most houses are of brick, the door frame would be grand but the rest of the structure being so rigid would crumble?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ballbags
                    Laterthanyou: nice one, i missed that line!

                    Regarding door frames, it does say somewhere on that sight that it's a big no no to stand under a door frame, as if the building moves side ways and the frame loosens also, the previously supported mass will crush you like a ____roach gets squished by the weight of my boot.

                    FULL PANIC ALERT: Kurogane WRONG AGAIN
                    AAAAAACCCCCCCCCCCCCCCKKKKKKKKKKKKKK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                    Maybe I had heard that at home, where the incomparable standards of Maple Syrup fed carpenters make it a safe bet.
                    Thanks for that info, Kintama bukuro

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kintama

                      I have heard that expression before, from this thing they call Kurogane: "kintama."
                      Does it not mean "golden balls"?
                      I want golden balls too.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X