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  • #46
    I was thinking about how this law is worded and how copyright holders must lodge a criminal complaint against a violator in order for penalties to be enforced. So, it seems to me, considering the tiny, tiny fraction of gaijin downloading foreign TV shows, movies and music that has little impact on J-right holders, just how likely is it that at the average level of DLing most of us do, the evil eye of J-Sauron will be turned toward us? This is mostly about J-music piracy.

    Comment


    • #47
      Precisely...

      Originally posted by jack-maierhofer View Post
      Getting concerned as well...
      But what happens if you're in a public WiFi environment, say Starbucks or any other place such as a hotel, in which you access the net via Wireless connection.
      How would anyone know which user is downloading/sharing at that place??

      That is the first thing that makes sense!

      However after a few weeks someone will notice it and either find a way to stop access to certain servers, or simply throttle the download speed, so it takes a few days to download 1 GB.... ?

      (Sorry if I sound paranoid, but living in Japan without access to foreign media does not sound very inviting. Apart from all the other absurdities this countries forces the people here to live with... Senkaku und Fukushima come immediately to mind)
      Last edited by John Grey; 2012-10-03, 07:50 AM.

      Comment


      • #48
        interesting topic... I want to ask a question here since I used t@#$ts for my anime downloading, as of Oct. 1 it is illegal to download a fansubbed anime? dvd/bd versions? ehh what about the currently broadcasting now that is fansubbed?

        Comment


        • #49
          You are avoiding the problem....

          Originally posted by Hijinx View Post
          Anyone use BTGuard? Thinking this might be for me.
          Your IP will know how much you are downloading!

          Comment


          • #50
            Quite comprehensive, thank you. But....

            Originally posted by BackDoor_Man View Post
            With a dash of technical knowledge and some preparation, you can safely use a public Wi-Fi network.
            By Michael Horowitz
            http://www.esecurityplanet.com/

            Wi-Fi security is a very different thing at home and away.

            Wi-Fi networks that you setup and control, be it at home or in a small business, start with an assumed safe group of users. The main security objectives, which I wrote about last time, are two-fold: encrypting data traveling over the air and keeping outsiders out.
            On a public wireless network you also need to be concerned with encrypting data coming into and out of your computer, but the solutions are very different. On top of this, public networks add new threats because you are now sharing a network with total strangers as opposed to a trusted group.

            Encryption
            Encryption is easy on your own network but a major pain on a public network. Home networks configured with WPA (more technically WPA-TKIP) or WPA2 (more technically WPA2-AES-CCMP) get their encryption for free, so to speak. As a user of the network all you need to do is enter the password and everything is encrypted.

            No fuss. No muss.

            Public networks typically don't use WPA or WPA2, leaving you to roll your own when it comes to encryption.
            The simplest solution is to use secure HTTPS web pages. For example, when I'm traveling for short periods of time, I use secure webmail for my email rather than Thunderbird, my preferred email software.

            However, some webmail systems only encrypt the page where you enter your user ID and password. They do not encrypt the pages where you read and write messages.

            Yahoo falls into this category. Both their free "classic" and "new" webmail systems send email to you unencrypted.
            Even Yahoo's Mail Plus system doesn't encrypt all webmail pages.

            Gmail swings both ways. By default, it will encrypt only the log-in page, but there is an option (Settings -> Browser Connection) to encrypt all webmail pages. Earthlink customers are fortunate, their webmail system serves up all pages using HTTPS.

            One problem with secure web pages is recognizing them. Only techies are constantly attuned to HTTP vs. HTTPS. Firefox users can force the browser to display a green address bar on all secure pages, making them much more visually obvious.

            But most web pages are not secure, no doubt including some that you would prefer everyone couldn't tell you were viewing.
            And the Internet is much more than just web pages. How can you encrypt everything on a public wireless network?

            Answer: a Virtual Private Network (a.k.a. VPN).

            Virtual Private Networks

            What WPA and WPA2 give you on your home network, a VPN gives you on a public network, encrypting everything coming into and out of your computer. I suspect there are millions of computer users that could and should be using a VPN but aren't aware of it as an option.
            VPNs are often couched in brutally obscure techie lingo. In part this is because their market has always been networking techies at large companies.
            But no longer. Newer types of VPNs are simpler to employ and are available to a newer audience: you and me.

            The classic VPN linked the network in one corporate office to another. Perhaps the most common use of VPNs is for traveling employees to make a secure link back to their home office.

            But there is another type of VPN for people who are not employed by large companies and/or who don't have a home office network they need to connect with.
            For lack of a better term, I'll refer to them as consumer VPNs.

            A corporate or business VPN treats the entire Internet as the enemy and encrypts everything between the traveling employee and the home office. A consumer VPN only treats the immediate area (typically a public wireless network) as the enemy. That is, the goal of a consumer VPN is to offer the same level of security you would have at home by using a wired Internet connection.

            Thus, a consumer VPN encrypts everything between you and the servers of the company offering the VPN service. After data gets to the VPN company's servers, it is decrypted and dumped on the Internet.

            To illustrate, assume that you are in Boston using a VPN service from a company in Virginia and listening to a radio station streaming from California (again, a VPN encrypts all traffic, including streaming audio). Data coming into your computer travels unencrypted from California to Virginia. The VPN company then encrypts the data (your favorite radio station) and sends it from Virginia to you in Boston. Software on your computer then decrypts the data.
            The goal here is that the network you are connected to in Boston, be it a public Wi-Fi network or perhaps a wired network in a hotel, only sees encrypted data. No one in Boston has any idea what you are doing on the Internet. (Thatfs a good thing if you're a fan of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.)

            The consumer VPN company that I have used and feel comfortable recommending is Witopia. They offer both SSL and PPTP based VPNs and do a reasonably good job of explaining the difference between the two. Each is offered on a yearly basis and they stand behind their products with a 30-day money-back guarantee.

            The VPN service that Leo Laporte and security expert Steve Gibson like is HotSpotVPN. They also offer a PPTP based VPN (HotSpotVPN-1) and an SSL based one (HotSpotVPN-2). Both services are sold by the day, week, month or year.

            Firewalls

            Another issue when sharing a computer network with strangers is keeping them out of your computer.
            The first line of defense here is a firewall program running on your computer. For an introduction to firewalls, see my previous article here an Introduction to Firewalls.
            A firewall program is basically a bunch of rules about what type of data is allowed in, and with better firewalls, what type of data is allowed out.
            In this case, the issue is incoming data. A good firewall should block all incoming unsolicited data.

            Does your firewall program do this?

            Unfortunately, this can be a very hard question to answer. Configuring a firewall, even for someone familiar with the basic concepts, can be maddening.
            Perhaps the best user interface I've seen for configuring the firewall rules is the firewall in Windows XP. As a firewall, it's lightweight but it's good enough for many people. Older versions of ZoneAlarm also had an easy to understand user interface.

            Rather than try to fight this fight, I suggest running a test. At his grc.com website, Steve Gibson offers a firewall testing service he calls ShieldsUP!.

            To understand the test, you need to know that he is testing "ports," which can be thought of as logical lines of communication. That is, they are not physical things. Open ports are bad, they represent a potential security hole through which bad guys may be able to access your computer.

            Closed ports are good. Stealthed ports are the best.

            For ShieldsUP! to be a valid test however, the computer being tested needs to be directly connected to the Internet. If the computer is connected to a router, then ShieldsUP! is testing the firewall in the router rather than the firewall program on your computer.

            File Sharing

            One of the bad things that can happen as a result of a hole in the firewall is that bad guys on the shared Wi-Fi network can see and copy files on your computer.
            As a second line of defense, consider disabling the file sharing feature in your operating system. For example, Windows XP users can bring up the properties of their wireless network connection from the Network Connections icon in the Control Panel. There is a checkbox for "File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks." Turning this off provides another hurdle for the bad guys to get through.

            If you never share files or printers on a network, then you can disable the underlying services in Windows. However, this prevents file sharing on wired networks and may be a pain to debug when a year or two down the road you want to start sharing files or printers.

            Who Are You? (The Fake Name)

            My last piece of advice concerns the names of wireless networks.
            Anyone setting up a wireless network can name it anything they like. Thus, if you find yourself in a Barnes and Noble store and want to use their free Wi-Fi, is their network called "bnwifi," "bnwireless," "barnesnoble" or "free public wifi"?

            The only way to know is ask someone who works for the store. Don't make any assumption about a wireless network based on its name. The last choice, "free public wifi" is infamous for not being what the name implies.

            It takes work, but it is possible to be safe and secure on a public Wi-Fi network.

            This article explains VPN and WiFi to a T. It is worth taking the time to read. It should answer anyones questions!
            You are ignoring the fact, that since Oct 1st DOWNLOADING already is illegal and no matter what you do (if my thinking is correct) your IP will know how much you download....

            Comment


            • #51
              That gives me an idea....

              Originally posted by hml View Post
              I use the neighbor's wifi and sleep just fine.
              Let us know, if he arrested for your downloading, or, which seems more reasonable, when he starts using a secure password so you can no longer access his wifi, because his IP warned him about his massive downloads.
              At least then we know what "they" are checking....

              Does anybody know, what speed McDonalds wifi provides? having a cup of coffe there is fine, but soending half a day....?

              Comment


              • #52
                You are probably right, but....

                Originally posted by Hijinx View Post
                I was thinking about how this law is worded and how copyright holders must lodge a criminal complaint against a violator in order for penalties to be enforced. So, it seems to me, considering the tiny, tiny fraction of gaijin downloading foreign TV shows, movies and music that has little impact on J-right holders, just how likely is it that at the average level of DLing most of us do, the evil eye of J-Sauron will be turned toward us? This is mostly about J-music piracy.
                I do believe that will be so, but....

                It is not the japanese but the hollywood lawyers who track the torrents. And then the question arises how many japanese IPs they find, and will it be worth their effort to follow them up. They might get an affiliation with a japanese media lawyers company and exchange data with them....?

                But from what I also read, it will be mostly about J-music piracy... once in jail we will have time to meditate on our wrong assumption. ;-)

                Comment


                • #53
                  is this will do any good?

                  http://thecyndicate.com/Communicatio...P-Tracking-You

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Hijinx View Post
                    I was thinking about how this law is worded and how copyright holders must lodge a criminal complaint against a violator in order for penalties to be enforced. So, it seems to me, considering the tiny, tiny fraction of gaijin downloading foreign TV shows, movies and music that has little impact on J-right holders, just how likely is it that at the average level of DLing most of us do, the evil eye of J-Sauron will be turned toward us? This is mostly about J-music piracy.
                    Well I hope you are right as I just downloaded today's episode of 'Sons of Anarchy' (not HD version) from a members only torrent site which took all of 2 or 3 minutes................. which lawmakers in Japan would give a flying f**k about this low level of downloading?

                    C'mon unless you're regularly downloading lots of Japanese stuff, popular Hollywood movies from well known bittorrent sites or huge Bluray boxsets that'll alert your ISP the risks have got to be pretty minimal...........but I understand the paranoia on this and other threads.

                    I hope the copyright holders of Sons Of Anarchy don't read this forum though..........

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by John Grey View Post
                      You are ignoring the fact, that since Oct 1st DOWNLOADING already is illegal and no matter what you do (if my thinking is correct) your IP will know how much you download....
                      I am not ignoring anything and your thinking is wrong! My IP will only know I am connected to America as I am using a VPN. They only see that connection they can not see what is going through that connection because everything in that stream is encrypted. Did you not understand how a VPN works? let me explain it again and if you still have questions feel free to ask! A VPN provides 5 Security Layers that are pretty darn hard for just anyone to bypass, but if the J. Government / US Government really wants to go through all that trouble, money, and man hours, just to bust me for illegally downloading then they are welcome to it!

                      Security Layers
                      1. IP Cloaking - Hides your IP to block unwanted exposure and data leaks
                      Our IP cloak masks your real IP address with one of our anonymous IP addresses, effectively keeping websites and internet services from tracking your web browsing habits, monitoring what you search for, and discovering your geographic location.

                      2. Encryption - Defends you from data monitoring and eavesdropping- Several, easy to use and readily available software packages that allow spammers and criminals to intercept your data exist, with more emerging daily. It is becoming increasingly simpler to hijack and steal data and information from insecure connections. If you access the internet through public wifi hotspots, shared internet routers, or even through your very own provider, your data, files and privacy may be at risk.
                      A VPN service utilizes high grade 128bit encryption based on Microsoft MS-CHAP v2 and 256bit encryption based on OpenVPN to keep your data safe. They also offer IPSEC and L2TP based technologies. These state of the art technologies are based on high level cryptographic formulas which are used by organizations operating at highest risk.

                      3. Firewall -Block unwanted connections - Integrating the advanced firewall and filtering capabilities of the Netfilter Project, you will never receive any unwanted connections to your computer or mobile device. This server-grade filtering software delivers optimal performance and keeps all network intrusions out.

                      4. Identity Protection - Browse anonymously - If your identity puts you at risk, anonymous browsing and posting anonymously on forums are of critical importance. Avoid becoming exposed. Additionally, anonymous browsing helps prevent data mining which keeps your data and identity secret. Privacy is very important in this era when websites are able to paint clear pictures of who you are and learn which websites you visit very easily with publicly available information.

                      5. Uncensored Access - If you are blocked by strict censorship by your Government, ISP or firewall, a VPN service will bypass the censorship and firewall, effectively providing you unrestricted access via a United States based IP address. In addition, any blocked software by your ISP including Voice over IP, P2P and other various software applications will be unblocked and unrestricted by a VPN.

                      Most US based VPN services do not allow P2P but they do provide connections to other countries, so from Ja@an you connect to America and from there you can connect to Russia or which ever country is in their pocket.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by shuin_zwei View Post
                        Sorry young man but that is crap! Your ISP would still be able to track you, what that clown showed is how to delete trackers from participating in the torrent stream. Which in reality lowers the speed of the torrent by deleting possible seeders from those trackers he showed how to delete and that has nothing to do with preventing your ISP from tracking you. I will say it again: The only way to prevent your ISP from tracking you is to invest in a VPN service. Read my post above!

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by jack-maierhofer View Post
                          Getting concerned as well...
                          But what happens if you're in a public WiFi environment, say Starbucks or any other place such as a hotel, in which you access the net via Wireless connection.
                          How would anyone know which user is downloading/sharing at that place??
                          Sooner or later that gets shut down! But if you are using a VPN no problem. I have one on my iPad and iPhone and whenever I use a public wifi I connect my VPN and away I go. People will claim that their ISP will know somebody is downloading but that is BS all the ISP can see that someone was connected to somewhere in America or whichever country the VPN in based at.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by BackDoor_Man View Post
                            Sooner or later that gets shut down! But if you are using a VPN no problem. I have one on my iPad and iPhone and whenever I use a public wifi I connect my VPN and away I go. People will claim that their ISP will know somebody is downloading but that is BS all the ISP can see that someone was connected to somewhere in America or whichever country the VPN in based at.
                            Correct me if I am wrong but are you engaging in illegal behaviour that would cost you, should you decide to do it all legally, just $20 or so? Even a huge movie buff surely couldn't spend more than $40 at your local store. I just don't get the risk/return equation.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Yoo Much BS on this thread

                              Like the title says: There is too much BS being spread on this thread/ The facts are there is a new law about downloading which will probably screw a lot of P2p user. We do not know what will happen if anything, but like old edin{ posted "Better safe than sorry". So if you want some sort of proyecyion and ease of mind then spend some yen and get a VPN service. With a VPN service, you are as protected as you can be.

                              People claiming that your ISP will still know that you are downloading are wrong! Your ISP will know that you are connected to some where in the US (If you are using a US based service) and that is all they will know. They can not see what is in that encrypted stream between your computer and the US, they do not have the time, efort and man hours that they would have to spend to break that encryption, just to bust some downloader.If you use public WiFi services for whatever, a VPN will protect you.

                              People claim that Governments can force the VPN services to give up their logs- Again that takes time and effort and they can not get something that idoes not exist!

                              Simply we have no idea what this law will do! So why take chances ?

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by ozzijp View Post
                                Correct me if I am wrong but are you engaging in illegal behaviour that would cost you, should you decide to do it all legally, just $20 or so? Even a huge movie buff surely couldn't spend more than $40 at your local store. I just don't get the risk/return equation.
                                How do you figure that it S20.00 or so? I engage in illegal behaviour because I will be darned if I pay Hollywood any money for any of their crappy movies! I do not download music, I only download TV shows and occasionally a film, which I watch on my computer and I delete as soon as it finishes. For illegally having that, Hollywood and their minions want to charge me thousands of dollars!

                                So if I legally went to watch a film I would probably wind up spending 3 to 5 thousand yen, per trip to the theater, Now for my money I would have to put up with all the annoying things that people do on the trains and theaters. There is only Japanese TV (which in my opinion sucks), I have internet TV but I so not watch that (only the family does) because the shows are outdated.

                                So I engaged a VPN service which cost me $39.99 per year, using that VPN service allows me to watch Hulu TV and NetFlick-but wait they only let you join if you have a credit card from the U.S. which I do not.

                                But that VPN service which cost me $39.99 per year, lets me download recent TV shows and Films, and provides me with some sort of protection from Hollywood and their Government lackeys - Oh boy I want that!

                                $39.99 =3,12844Yen

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