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  • Why No Working Holiday Visa for Americans

    I as well as some of my friends are trying to determine why the US and Japan do not have a reciprocal agreement regarding work holiday visas. Does anyone here have any idea or some further knowledge on this issue.? Is it an American decision or Japanese one. The same also applys for changing a drivers license. I have e-mailed the US immigration, embassy, Japanese consulate and embassy as well as my senator and congressman - no reply yet. Itend to thin kit is more an American decsion and Japan is just following suit.
    Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by peterh1971
    I as well as some of my friends are trying to determine why the US and Japan do not have a reciprocal agreement regarding work holiday visas. Does anyone here have any idea or some further knowledge on this issue.? Is it an American decision or Japanese one. The same also applys for changing a drivers license. I have e-mailed the US immigration, embassy, Japanese consulate and embassy as well as my senator and congressman - no reply yet. Itend to thin kit is more an American decsion and Japan is just following suit.
    Thanks
    No idea, but when you consider that the US has a HUGE problem with illegal immigrants in the US and people working illegally in the US, and it is even impossible now for foreign businessmen (Arabs, egyptians etc) to even get a legal visa to go to the US on business and research Im not surprised. (I have recently heard of people taking up to a 6 months to a year to get a visa to go to the US to study)

    Japanese young people cant work in the US on WHV so Americans cant come here, simple as that as there is no bilateral treaty allowing it. You scratch my back I'll scratch yours.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, that what I thought!

      I have a feeling that it is more an American decision than anything else. Hell it took my wife over two years to get a temporary resident card in the US...It's just rediculous. Oh well, maybe things will change in the future. Personally I havea spouse visa but , I would like to see a reciprocal agrreement regarding this between the US and Japan.

      Comment


      • #4
        Ask the US State Department.

        Japan has a number of bilateral agreements with other countries, who reciprocally offer Japanese citizens a long-term stay/ working holiday in their country.

        The US refuses to offer Japan the same sort of agreement, so US citizens are not afforded the same courtesy.

        When the US reduces its visa period to Japanese (and others) to one month only, which is something under consideration), the Japanese Foreign Ministry will no doubt reciprocate.

        Comment


        • #5
          I just read in the paper about one US small company that lost a $175,000 contract with an offshore company for machine parts to a Belgian company because the customers Egyptian engineer couldnt get a visa to enter the US. Other US companies are losing about $1 million a day as they can not get their products on the market due to visa holdups. Even Arab doctors with jobs lined up at hospitals etc cant get visas to get into the US

          Many US companies are now starting to take their companies to the customers by setting up offshore or going through offshore subsidiaries.

          Comment


          • #6
            Can't comment on the WHV visa deal but I did read about the drivers licence issue for Americans. The info below comes from http://www.japandriverslicense.com FAQ

            Q. This is not fair! I am an American Citizen! Why do U.S. citizens need to take a written and road test when most Europeans and Canadians do not need to? Can't we protest? Is there not some way around this? Has the U.S. Embassy been informed of this unfair treatment of U.S. citizens?
            A. We felt the same anger, then took a deep breath, remembered that we were in Japan, then let it go and turned our energies towards building this site and developing our services. There is no way around this. Yes the U.S. Embassy is well aware of the requirement. As far as we can determine from our research, as drivers licenses are a state level issue in the U.S., and not a Federal issue, this is one of the main reasons why there are not reciprocal agreements between the U.S. and Japan like there are with many European countries. Another main reason is that when Foreigners, including Japanese move to the U.S. they are required to go through a similar process and they must do it way before 12 months are up. In California, for example, you can only drive legaly using an International Driving permit for 10 days if you are a resident.

            So, make it hard for the Japanese to get some thing like a visa or a licence and they will make it hard for you. Great to see that the Yanks don't get every thing their own way all of the time!

            Comment


            • #7
              Sasukene

              Don't try to turn this around on me man. I asked an honest question. I wasn't _____ing wasn't complaining, wasn't claiming that "I am an American Citizen". I am just tying to get to the bottom of an issue.

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              • #8
                Americans...

                It is about time Americans got a taste of there own medicine really. They changed the visa rules to suit themselves recently. Molly Meldrum (a famous Australian entertainment identity...an icon really) was refused entry for a short stay a couple of months back because the visa which had changed and was no longer appropriate. Forget the fact that he had used that same visa countless times over the past decade at least. The yanks sent him home from LA without even letting him out of the airport.

                What goes around comes around really....

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by peterh1971
                  Don't try to turn this around on me man. I asked an honest question. I wasn't _____ing wasn't complaining, wasn't claiming that "I am an American Citizen". I am just tying to get to the bottom of an issue.
                  Donft be paranoid Pete, it was nothing personal. If anything the barb was aimed at your inward looking governement, not you. Hell, some of my best friends are Americans and I lived there for 5 years. It is just during my career in the service industry I have lost count of how many times I have heard an American customer say gwhy canft I do this or that in another country, I am American!h Kind of sad really.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    makes me sad

                    so so sad to be an american..................so I came to Japan....and at times I do find myself comparing the 2 countries but never with these statements of why can't i do it....I'm an american......I chose to live here so I will abide by the rules and play the cards as they are delt!!!!

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                    • #11
                      I agree. You move somewhere, anywhere, you must be willing to change. If not, then do not move. It's that simple, and seems the most logical.

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                      • #12
                        The WHV was initially started as a sort of Commonwealth agreement between the UK and Australia. This was extended year by year to include many other members of the club, ie Canada, New Zealand, Malaysia etc for the UK, and Australia took the lead by extending this system to include Korea, Japan, France,Holland, Italy, Ireland, South Africa, Sweden. and a few others etc.

                        All these countries have reciprocal agreements with each other, however the number of available places on the scheme differs hugely. Australia for example extends about 25000 visas a year to the UK, and vise versa, but only a couple of thousand to Sweden and France, therefore this is reciprocated. As the USA does not offer anyone a WHV it does not receive one from anyone. Plain and Simple. Japan and the UK only set up the WHV beginning about three years ago, and I believe there are only about 1000 places either way. Likewise for Japan and France / Germany.

                        Basically, give and ye shall receive..........

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Against WHV

                          This is probabley going to be hugely unpopular but I support the US's not having a WHV program. The reason is because I think it would result ina huge disparity in jobs between the two countries. When Americans go to Japan to work they are largely only able to procure employment in teaching and its teaching english. In the US there isn't a very large demand for Japanese teachers. No instead young japanese want to come here and take high paying jobs in enginering, etc. These are jobs that Americans are qualified to do as well as being highly desirable. I asked a few japanese students at a university here if they were offered positions in the US to teach japanese would they take them? there response was all around "No" I dont think a WHV program would be a good idea for American interests. Maybe if we created a WHV program and said you could only teach Japanese, maybe then the Japanese goverment would open their regualtions on recruiting.

                          Vallient

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                          • #14
                            A Valiant effort, but

                            Remember, though, it is a Working HOLIDAY exchange programme, not a working visa programme. For the most part, the Japanese that go to partner countries work for far less money, and generally make a net addition to the local economy, simply because they view it, for the most part, as a working holiday, and so carry in savings. Unlike us, they don't see it as a quick easy chance to scam a job that pays too much to too many who are too underqualified.

                            So, I think you are comparing Apples and Oranges, there.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yeah, Japanese can come to NZ for a year on a WHV I think. I have taught a few and they are not stealing the lovely well paid IT jobs believe me. They are working in cafes, pubs, hotels , hairdressers (that is the ones I met). They buy old cars, go skiing, visit the hot pools, get a bit pissed and have a lovely old time in general. Good for them.

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