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  • Luggage Questions

    Hey all,

    I'm an American planning to head to Kyoto about three weeks from now. I will be studying at a language school for at least a year so I'm trying to get a handle on what I can/cannot bring with me. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    1) I'm planning to bring along a year's supply of prescription contact lenses. Since they're individually packaged in sterile solution, would they be counted as a liquids? And if so, would I need to place them into a ziplock bag and declare it to TSA?

    2) I'd like to bring my guitar along on my trip if possible. It's nothing fancy; just a $400 acoustic that I've had for a while. Which of these options would be the most recommended? For reference, I will be using All Nippon Airways.
    a) Check it in to baggage
    b) Bring it aboard as a carry-on
    c) Ship it through mail
    d) Leave it home and get a new one in Japan

    3) After arriving at Kansai International Airport (Osaka), I will need to somehow carry everything back to my apartment in Kyoto. What type of transportation would you recommend for someone completely unfamiliar with the area and only able to read kana?

  • #2
    Originally posted by finalxcution View Post
    Hey all,

    I'm an American planning to head to Kyoto about three weeks from now. I will be studying at a language school for at least a year so I'm trying to get a handle on what I can/cannot bring with me. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    1) I'm planning to bring along a year's supply of prescription contact lenses. Since they're individually packaged in sterile solution, would they be counted as a liquids? And if so, would I need to place them into a ziplock bag and declare it to TSA?

    2) I'd like to bring my guitar along on my trip if possible. It's nothing fancy; just a $400 acoustic that I've had for a while. Which of these options would be the most recommended? For reference, I will be using All Nippon Airways.
    a) Check it in to baggage
    b) Bring it aboard as a carry-on
    c) Ship it through mail
    d) Leave it home and get a new one in Japan

    3) After arriving at Kansai International Airport (Osaka), I will need to somehow carry everything back to my apartment in Kyoto. What type of transportation would you recommend for someone completely unfamiliar with the area and only able to read kana?
    As for your contact lenses, I would place them into a ziplock bag and declare it to TSA. Though I wouldnt hesitate to contact the ANA before your flight.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by finalxcution View Post
      Hey all,

      I'm an American planning to head to Kyoto about three weeks from now. I will be studying at a language school for at least a year so I'm trying to get a handle on what I can/cannot bring with me. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

      1) I'm planning to bring along a year's supply of prescription contact lenses. Since they're individually packaged in sterile solution, would they be counted as a liquids? And if so, would I need to place them into a ziplock bag and declare it to TSA?

      2) I'd like to bring my guitar along on my trip if possible. It's nothing fancy; just a $400 acoustic that I've had for a while. Which of these options would be the most recommended? For reference, I will be using All Nippon Airways.
      a) Check it in to baggage
      b) Bring it aboard as a carry-on
      c) Ship it through mail
      d) Leave it home and get a new one in Japan

      3) After arriving at Kansai International Airport (Osaka), I will need to somehow carry everything back to my apartment in Kyoto. What type of transportation would you recommend for someone completely unfamiliar with the area and only able to read kana?

      1) Contact lenses should be fine. I don't think you need to declare them, but large solution bottles, you do.

      2) I would ship the guitar surface mail if you're willing to wait that long, or just buy a used one in Japan. I don't think the airline will allow it as carry on if it can't fit under the seat or in the overhead bin (contact the airline), and you don't want to use up one of your two checked bag allowance.

      3) You can ship luggage from the airport ("takkyubin," near the exit from customs and immigration) to your address in Kyoto. Write down your Kyoto address in Japanese and show it to the shipping service people. Carry what you can manage on the train (Haruka).

      Comment


      • #4
        Ah, I wasn't aware Takkyubin was an option. I'll definitely look into it! As for Haruka, assuming I arrive during the afternoon/evening on a Sunday, how packed would I expect it to be? I'm trying to figure out if getting a reserved ticket would be worth it over non-reserved.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by finalxcution View Post
          Ah, I wasn't aware Takkyubin was an option. I'll definitely look into it! As for Haruka, assuming I arrive during the afternoon/evening on a Sunday, how packed would I expect it to be? I'm trying to figure out if getting a reserved ticket would be worth it over non-reserved.
          I would go non-reserved. You can always upgrade on the train if you want.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by finalxcution View Post
            2) I'd like to bring my guitar along on my trip if possible.
            It really depends on how much you want to be the slackjawed douche____ that plays his ____ty guitar badly in his paper-thin walled apartment.

            How much do you want or need to be that guy?



            At any rate, I vote you go for this option.

            Originally posted by finalxcution View Post

            d) Leave it home and don't bother getting a new one in Japan; that way I won't be the douchey slackjawed ____tard neighbour that plays the ____ING guitar in a Japanese apartment.

            If you do bring it, please post your full address so we can post it on KillAmateurGuitar____s.com

            Comment


            • #7
              1) Just put your contacts in your checked in luggage. They will be fine. liquids are ok in checked-in luggage.

              2) I brought my guitar when I came here. They won't let you take it as a carry on, and I had to pay $125 to get it checked (note: this was over a decade ago). For a $400 guitar, for only a year, I probably would leave it and try to buy a 2nd hand one cheap here. You can probably get a used one of the same quality for about the same price as shipping it on the plane.

              3) If you have the money, it would be worth it to catch a taxi. You will be new to the country with a whack of luggage, no clue on how the trains work, or where you are going, after a long, long flight. A taxi may be expensive (even a cheap one is 3000 yen, if you live far enough it could even be 15000 - 20000 yen), but it will get you right where you are going with a minimum of hassles.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Effected After View Post
                3) If you have the money, it would be worth it to catch a taxi. You will be new to the country with a whack of luggage, no clue on how the trains work, or where you are going, after a long, long flight. A taxi may be expensive (even a cheap one is 3000 yen, if you live far enough it could even be 15000 - 20000 yen), but it will get you right where you are going with a minimum of hassles.
                The Haruka goes direct from the airport to Kyoto station, it takes about 90 minutes, leaves from the JR station. There are also limousine buses though Im not sure if they go to Kyoto. There is a Yasaka shuttle Taxi service that will take you to your door, but you may have to reserve them in advance. I have used them before from Kyoto costs about 3-4,000 yen. Regular taxis will cost a bundle.
                Last edited by KansaiBen; 2012-03-14, 10:27 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  You seem to have missed my caveat: "If you have the money". Of course it's expensive. It's also convenient. Which are the two things I talked about.

                  I remember coming to Japan, with a guitar, a huge backpack and two suitcases, and even though I was stoked to be in Japan, trying to get around in a country I didn't know to a location I didn't know, on a system I didn't know, after being up for 30 some hours really sucked. In retrospect, I would have paid for a taxi.

                  Comment

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