Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

As the Beatles say, "The long and winding road..." ;)

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse



X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • As the Beatles say, "The long and winding road..." ;)

    I suppose itfs a situation everyone finds his or herself in at some point; itfs necessary, exciting, bewildering, and ca pain. I am in my last year of high school, which means that I have to make an imperative decision in my life. Where will I go to college? What will I study? Who the hell am I?

    Anyway, Ifm getting ahead of myself. Right now I have to focus on getting accepted to as many schools as I can. I have applied to various schools across my home country, (US) but there is still something left to be desired. I want to study in Japan regardless of the fact that I have been warned against being a teenager and going to that country with farfetched aspirations. Every school I applied to offers study abroad to Japan, some more than others. Still, something else (more yet) is desired. I would like to attend a university located in Japan but operated under English instruction. I have taken interest in gTemple University Japanh in Tokyo. I am not sure how valuable of a degree this would be especially since that farfetched aspiration is a business job in Japan. (If anything I could study 2 years at TUJ then transfer to a more reputable school.) Do you think it would be a good idea to attend TUJ? Are there any other good schools that fit under my description? Am I indulging in some ____ty pipe dream?

    To be honest, I was hesitant to post this here as I have seen the replies that these kinds of questions receive. I am not thin-skinned, I want the truth, and I appreciate any responses that I get. However, the gjust stay home – forget about ith or gyou will be miserableh kind of responses arenft really helpful.

    Thank you for your time.


  • #2
    Re: As the Beatles say, "The long and winding road..."

    Tony

    I am a graduate of Temple University japan (Masters degree) and considering you would be a student at a foreign university, I wonder how you would pay the tuition fees. A degree at Temple University will cost you about 2 million yen (about $20,000) over 4 years and as its a non Japanese foreign university, you will not qualify for a student visa. TUJ is not recognised as a university in Japan, even though it is fully accreditted in the US. You can only get a student visa if you attend a japanese education institution.

    To go to TUJ you will have to think about how you will pay the school fees when you are not working here, and how you will support yourself in Tokyo with high rent and high living expenses. There are only three foreign universities in japan and though you can transfer TUJ credits to other universities, Im not sure they are transferable to a japanese degree.

    Im not saying you cant do it, but you have to consider the obstacles you will face.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: As the Beatles say, "The long and winding road..."

      For the visa problem, I was considering the following:

      -Apply to the Philadelphia Main Campus then gstudy abroadh for my 2nd and 3rd year. (Ideally, I would be in Japan all 4 years though)

      -Work (somehow) part time to get a visa. Unfortunately, this seems too unrealistic.

      20k a year for 4 years or 20k for all 4 years? Actually I have *about* 20k saved for my education. As for the rest Ifd take out loans. Living expenses you say? Is there no undergraduate student housing?

      Hmmm, can you tell the names of the other two foreign schools? How do they compare to TUJ? What did you think of TUJ?

      Well, I think that I am pretty fortunate to get a response from a graduate from the very school that I was inquiring about. Thanks Paul.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: As the Beatles say, "The long and winding road..."

        Here is the info by the Japanese government on issuing student visas. I am not the final authority on this so if it doubt please contact the embassy or consulate about your eligibility

        (2 years or 1 year)
        Activities to receive education at colleges or equivalent educational institutions, specialized courses of study at miscellaneous schools (senshu gakko), educational institutions designated for preparing persons who have completed 12 years of education at schools in foreign countries to enter college, or technical colleges (koto senmon gakko). Applicants must fulfill certain conditions regarding ability to pay living expenses, etc.


        For the visa problem, I was considering the following:

        -Apply to the Philadelphia Main Campus then gstudy abroadh for my 2nd and 3rd year. (Ideally, I would be in Japan all 4 years though)


        It should be possible to transfer credits or do all or some of the degree in either philadephia or in Japan. I did the whole degree in osaka but its possible to pick up credits or do the D.Ed etc in the main US campus having got TUJ credits. As It say its a question of getting a student visa and being able to support yourself.

        -Work (somehow) part time to get a visa. Unfortunately, this seems too unrealistic.

        You can work up to 20 hours a week of a student visa but generally full time work is not allowed and you need to be enrolled full time in a program, usually at a Japanese language school or at a Japanese university.

        20k a year for 4 years or 20k for all 4 years? Actually I have *about* 20k saved for my education. As for the rest Ifd take out loans. Living expenses you say? Is there no undergraduate student housing?

        I have no info on the TUJ in Tokyo- they may help you with housing and introduce you tpo landlords etc but i dont think they have any of their own apartments etc

        For info on fees at TUJ go to http://www.tuj.ac.jp. My M.Ed degree (30 credits cost me about 2 million yen, but i have no recent info on the undergrad program. the TUJ website should tell you)


        Hmmm, can you tell the names of the other two foreign schools? How do they compare to TUJ? What did you think of TUJ?

        The only two schools that offer full foreign university degrees and operate a campus in Japan are Temple University, Columbia University (New york) and lakeland college. There are several others with tie-ups to Japanese institutions but they are mainly for japanese students wanting to study in the US, a veritable cash cow for many struggling US colleges.
        Columbia offers a Masters program for teachers wanting to get qualified in TESL and as far as I know it has a good program. I dont know anything about Lakeland.

        I have written an online article about my time at Temple at http://www.teachinginjapan.com/continuinged.html




        Well, I think that I am pretty fortunate to get a response from a graduate from the very school that I was inquiring about. Thanks Paul.

        No problems- email me if you have any questions

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: As the Beatles say, "The long and winding road..."

          Link to TUJs undergraduate website

          http://www.tuj.ac.jp/newsite/main/cla/index.html


          Good luck,

          Paul

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: As the Beatles say, "The long and winding road..."

            It seems like TUJ would be great for ESL. I am not sure about business. Perhaps it would be better to go to DePaul in Chicago, which I have already been accepted to. I will look into TUJfs programs further.

            Since TUJ cannot sponsor student visas, how am I to attain any visa at all? I looked into it and gvisa typeh is on the TUJ undergraduate application. I suppose I would have to get a job in Japan then apply. To be honest, the idea of going to a foreign country with no concrete plans intimidates me, but it might be the only option. Is this what you did?

            Ifll do more research.

            Thanks

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: As the Beatles say, "The long and winding road..."

              Chicken or the egg here- to get a work visa you need a degree, yet you want to get the degree so you can get a work visa.

              I will email TUJ and ask them about their visa policy- I am actually going home for 2 weeks so it may be a while before you get a reply

              Another option is to do the course in Chicago and then come over on a tourist visa and enrol in a semester of classes at temple. it should be no problem getting a 3 month visa and then getting it renewed for a further 3 months. Immigration just doesnt like people working on tourist visas but should be no problem if you are going to school here.

              As for coming to Japan, I came here with one suitcase a lot of dreams and not much else and I'm still here many years later. The idea in the beginning is to set some short or medium term goals, decide exactly what you are aiming for and what you want out of the experience. What do you want to be able to do by the time you graduate from Temple? How much time will you devote to studying Japanese etc?

              Glenski and I have mentioned often that there is only so much you can do or achieve in a couple of years in Japan esp. if you dont speak the language or have any skills, so you have to be realistic in your goals, realise it takes a long time for things to happen for you here and to get your career off the ground, and for you win out it takes persistence, meeting and developing contacts and being in the right place at the right time.

              Comment

              Working...
              X