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  • Hot pepper sauce

    I made a Caribbean style hot pepper sauce yesterday, using fresh Scotch Bonnet peppers, which I blended with herbs and spices. I followed a generationsf old method, but I added a modern twist.

    God, it was hot!! Itfs not for the feint hearted!

  • #2
    Originally posted by tom.svg
    I made a Caribbean style hot pepper sauce yesterday, using fresh Scotch Bonnet peppers, which I blended with herbs and spices. I followed a generationsf old method, but I added a modern twist.

    God, it was hot!! Itfs not for the feint hearted!
    Sounds great Tom. What's your recipe? Where did you manage to find the peppers? I've never come across them here (assuming you live in Japan).

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by HavanaClub
      Sounds great Tom. What's your recipe? Where did you manage to find the peppers? I've never come across them here (assuming you live in Japan).
      The peppers are readily available from a market in my hometown in the UK, but thatfs due to the sizeable Caribbean community. I never came across them in Japan.

      Tell you what:

      Ifll try to sneak some in when I arrive for the GP summer party. Ifll make some if someone would be kind enough to loan me the use of their kitchen. Like I said, itfs not for the feint hearted!

      Comment


      • #4
        i am not into food, but i love hot stuff, i almost drink tabasco, any hot sauce that is added in almost any dish is great.

        don't need to know the dish.
        i just wanted to tell you this.

        Comment


        • #5
          Sandro:

          You can be the first to give my hot pepper sauce a whirl at the GP summer party. Itfll make your eyes water!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tom.svg
            Sandro:

            You can be the first to give my hot pepper sauce a whirl at the GP summer party. Itfll make your eyes water!
            It can't be that hot. I've had hot stuff in Mexico and Thailand, managed to become inured to foods loaded with large heaping handfuls of peppers, chilies, herbs and spices.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by edinjapan
              It can't be that hot. I've had hot stuff in Mexico and Thailand, managed to become inured to foods loaded with large heaping handfuls of peppers, chilies, herbs and spices.
              Edinjapan:

              Have you tried Scotch Bonnet peppers before? Theyfre not to be confused with chillies, or Tabasco sauce. Check out the links below, paying particular attention to the "Heat Index" in the 2nd link.

              My home made stuff would come under the "Local Pepper Sauce" category.

              http://www.awesome-chef-recipes.com/scotch_bonnet.htm
              http://www.solanum.org/bonnets.htm

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tom.svg
                Edinjapan:

                Have you tried Scotch Bonnet peppers before? Theyfre not to be confused with chillies, or Tabasco sauce. Check out the links below, paying particular attention to the "Heat Index" in the 2nd link.

                My home made stuff would come under the "Local Pepper Sauce" category.

                http://www.awesome-chef-recipes.com/scotch_bonnet.htm
                http://www.solanum.org/bonnets.htm
                i have not checked the site.
                but have you ever drunk tabasco? not the classic, but the abanero one, probabaly not right spelling, one way is to eat stuff marinated with hot sauces, the other is to drink or eat the sauces directly, it is a huge difference i can tell you
                but i am looking forward to the party.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tom.svg
                  Edinjapan:

                  Have you tried Scotch Bonnet peppers before? Theyfre not to be confused with chillies, or Tabasco sauce. Check out the links below, paying particular attention to the "Heat Index" in the 2nd link.

                  My home made stuff would come under the "Local Pepper Sauce" category.

                  http://www.awesome-chef-recipes.com/scotch_bonnet.htm
                  http://www.solanum.org/bonnets.htm

                  This is absolutely correct! A jalapeno or some Asian chilies can be eaten raw (whole). I have a very high tolerance for spicy foods but concede that it would be foolhardy to do the same with a habanero. I think the likely result could be referred to as "injurious".

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by HavanaClub
                    This is absolutely correct! A jalapeno or some Asian chilies can be eaten raw (whole). I have a very high tolerance for spicy foods but concede that it would be foolhardy to do the same with a habanero. I think the likely result could be referred to as "injurious".

                    yep, injurious or a killer,
                    i almost addicted to it, i have to have it on any dry dish.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Jalapenos are not really all that hot. Back in New Mexico Ifve eaten them right off the bush. I needed another Negro Modelo pretty quick after that but it wasnft traumatic. Much hotter fresh than canned or cooked.

                      But the Habanero – no way Jose. Those are supposed to be the hottest chiles in the world. Yes, chiles are different things entirely from peppers so it's hard to compare them directly.

                      Habaneros are grown in Japan but unfortunately – from what I was told – the entire crop is emulsified and used as an organic pesticide. None of it gets channeled for human consumption.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HavanaClub
                        This is absolutely correct! A jalapeno or some Asian chilies can be eaten raw (whole). I have a very high tolerance for spicy foods but concede that it would be foolhardy to do the same with a habanero. I think the likely result could be referred to as "injurious".
                        When I worked at the original Hilton we had a smartass Japanese chef and during a promotion there were several chefs over from Martinique to do their stuff. They had a chutney that 'they' referred to as mild but was roaring hot on the typical Japanese palate. The idiot was convinced to try a spoonful and I've never seen someone run for water so quick in my life.

                        Truthfully, the pickles were really good! I'll pass the link on to my GF. She likes the 'Died Gone To Hell and Returned as a Zombie' hotsauces and other super hot and spicy dishes.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          not to generalize, but i find the all the japanese people i have eaten hot stuff with, had a quite low tolerance in hot dishes, they just sweat very easily, and can't take too much of that, probably their palate is quite sensitive.

                          what is hot for them, is not as hot to me.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by edinjapan
                            When I worked at the original Hilton we had a smartass Japanese chef and during a promotion there were several chefs over from Martinique to do their stuff. They had a chutney that 'they' referred to as mild but was roaring hot on the typical Japanese palate. The idiot was convinced to try a spoonful and I've never seen someone run for water so quick in my life.

                            Truthfully, the pickles were really good! I'll pass the link on to my GF. She likes the 'Died Gone To Hell and Returned as a Zombie' hotsauces and other super hot and spicy dishes.
                            There's a brand of habanero sauces made in Belize called "Marie Sharp's" that I buy at Meiji Ya. They're quite good and pleasantly-to-very hot. Any bottled Jerk sauce is also a good bet, although the homemade stuff reigns supreme.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Papaya is sometimes added to the Scotch Bonnet pepper mix to cool things down a bit. In terms of tolerances for hot spice sauces, I think that you have to build your resistance up over time.

                              My great-grandmother use to add whole Scotch Bonnet peppers to her cooking to give it an extra bang. When finished, shefd eat the peppers – whole!

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