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  • Jobs, Visas, Living in general

    Hello everyone, I'm new to posting on these forums but have been a lurker from time to time.

    I visited Japan 2 years ago and I really loved my time there. Since then I have been thinking on relocating to Japan, hopefully by 2012 right before the world ends. I know my time in Japan during a vacation will be different from what it would be like if I lived there.

    My main concern is basically two things, being able to have a visa and a job. I can't stay in Japan without a visa and I need a job so I can earn a living. What worries me is my ability to accomplish both of these things.

    What I have under my disposal are a BBA in Accounting and currently working on a second degree on Computer and Web technologies (basically computer and web programming and design) that should be done next year. I speak native Spanish and English. My Japanese is very basic, I have really good pronunciation but my vocabulary is limited and so is my kanji knowledge. I am working on improving my Japanese.

    As far as a job goes, I would be fine doing pretty much whatever as long as I can earn a living. I would teach English or Spanish or both, I would work in a job that utilized my studies, or doing some other job. But what is scary to me is actually being able to find and get these jobs. On top of that, how do I go about to find and get said job, if I were to get it, if I don't have a long term stay visa?

    I would love some input, I figured this would be a good place to ask. I will answer any questions if needed. Oh and if it matters, I live in the United States.

  • #2
    Originally posted by ddzang View Post
    Hello everyone, I'm new to posting on these forums but have been a lurker from time to time.

    I visited Japan 2 years ago and I really loved my time there. Since then I have been thinking on relocating to Japan, hopefully by 2012 right before the world ends. I know my time in Japan during a vacation will be different from what it would be like if I lived there.

    My main concern is basically two things, being able to have a visa and a job. I can't stay in Japan without a visa and I need a job so I can earn a living. What worries me is my ability to accomplish both of these things.

    What I have under my disposal are a BBA in Accounting and currently working on a second degree on Computer and Web technologies (basically computer and web programming and design) that should be done next year. I speak native Spanish and English. My Japanese is very basic, I have really good pronunciation but my vocabulary is limited and so is my kanji knowledge. I am working on improving my Japanese.

    As far as a job goes, I would be fine doing pretty much whatever as long as I can earn a living. I would teach English or Spanish or both, I would work in a job that utilized my studies, or doing some other job. But what is scary to me is actually being able to find and get these jobs. On top of that, how do I go about to find and get said job, if I were to get it, if I don't have a long term stay visa?

    I would love some input, I figured this would be a good place to ask. I will answer any questions if needed. Oh and if it matters, I live in the United States.
    I had never heard of a BBA, but... good for you.

    if you check out Amazon.com, Google, or your local bookstore, there are books that can tell you all about life as a teacher, and how to get those jobs here.

    good luck to you.

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    • #3
      All BBA means is Bachelor of Business Administration.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ddzang View Post
        All BBA means is Bachelor of Business Administration.
        yes, Mr. Google told me that .... While many in Japan have heard of MBA, you will have to explain BBA at every turn.

        Comment


        • #5
          Ah I see what you mean, sorry if I came about strong or offensive, I thought you didn't know so I just wanted to make it clear.

          Hmm, so I should just say I have a degree in accounting and not mention any acronyms?

          Besides this talk, any help on the other issues?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ddzang View Post
            Ah I see what you mean, sorry if I came about strong or offensive, I thought you didn't know so I just wanted to make it clear.

            Hmm, so I should just say I have a degree in accounting and not mention any acronyms?

            Besides this talk, any help on the other issues?

            no offense taken.
            you should just say that you studied business in college.

            as for jobs, Berlitz could use your biligual skills and you may be able to teach both Spanish and English. Other schools may as well. Best to send the resumes out and see who is interested.

            You will need sponsorship by a company - in a full-time position, in order to be granted a visa to stay in Japan. Do some research into the area in which you would like to live, and then apply to companies with schools in that area. Learn about the business of teaching languages in the mean time.

            small steps are important steps.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ddzang View Post
              I would love some input, I figured this would be a good place to ask. I will answer any questions if needed. Oh and if it matters, I live in the United States.
              Just out of curiousity are you a US national or are you simply resident there?

              All immigration cares about is the color of your passport.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by well_bicyclically View Post
                no offense taken.
                you should just say that you studied business in college.

                as for jobs, Berlitz could use your biligual skills and you may be able to teach both Spanish and English. Other schools may as well. Best to send the resumes out and see who is interested.

                You will need sponsorship by a company - in a full-time position, in order to be granted a visa to stay in Japan. Do some research into the area in which you would like to live, and then apply to companies with schools in that area. Learn about the business of teaching languages in the mean time.

                small steps are important steps.
                Berlitz huh, I see thank you, I will have to look into them. I suppose if they were to hire me they would sponsor my visa right? I agree with the small steps comment, that's why I want to know many things about this, I just don't want to ask too many questions too quickly because I don't want to bother you guys too much. I will try to research on my own as well.

                Originally posted by KansaiBen View Post
                Just out of curiousity are you a US national or are you simply resident there?

                All immigration cares about is the color of your passport.
                I'm a US national, I was born in the United States and my passport is the blue.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ddzang View Post
                  Berlitz huh, I see thank you, I will have to look into them. I suppose if they were to hire me they would sponsor my visa right? ...
                  You are correct. to stay in Japan, you must by issued a visa by the Ministry of Immigration. To be issued a visa, you have to have a sponsor who will be responsible for you and you must also show that you have an income that is enough to live on. Schools that offer full-time jobs often act as sponsor and assist in obtaining visas. Schools that offer part-time work do not have to get involved with the process of helping teachers with the visa. Many schools hope to employ teachers who are married to Japanese nationals so as to not have to bother with the visa processing. Those in Japan with a spousal visa can work full or part time wherever they wish

                  the big schools: ECC, Aeon, Berlitz, former Geos, former Nova... are used to the visa issuing process and do it often. They also are used to on-boarding new instructors from abroad, training of new teachers, assisting with getting set up in living in Japan, etc.

                  Those schools may also prohibit their instructors from entering into other work outside of working for them.

                  Over the last few years, those schools have decreased their reliance upon full-time teachers.

                  While you are in Japan, you are responsible for filing US Income tax with the IRS, Japanese Income tax, and paying the local residence tax. The department of Immigration have recently played with idea of requiring applicants to show verification that they are covered by medical insurance in order to be issued a visa to live and work in Japan. You can either enter the National Health system in Japan, or seek out private medical coverage. There are differences with the costs and coverage for both. Legally, the relationship between the verification of coverage and the issueing of a visa has been toned down significantly.

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