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  • 2nd year contracts

    Quite soon I will have to negotiate a new work contract.

    As far as I was concerned, in the 2nd year of working for a school, you should be offered more money, on the basis that you are no longer training, you have not abused any of the kids, and that you do turn up on time, at least once a week.

    Do people ever get offered less than their initial contract, when their work has been of a good enough standard?

  • #2
    Originally posted by hikhik
    Quite soon I will have to negotiate a new work contract.

    As far as I was concerned, in the 2nd year of working for a school, you should be offered more money, on the basis that you are no longer training, you have not abused any of the kids, and that you do turn up on time, at least once a week.

    Do people ever get offered less than their initial contract, when their work has been of a good enough standard?

    And as far as your boss is concerned you are disposable enough to not be re-hired as you have your hand out for more money

    So what is a good enough standard for you and why should the fact you dont abuse kids mean you deserve more money?

    Being punctual for your job is a requirement and not something you should be rewarded for.

    You have a lot to learn about working in Japan as it seems you feel the world owes you a living.

    Comment


    • #3
      I was being sarcastic, of course not abusing the kids is taken for granted.

      What I meant to imply, is that unlike many teachers who turn up late, get complaints from students/parents/staff, teach bad lessons, whine about lack of breaks/holidays, etc etc etc - I am a good teacher who does not make any problems for the school.

      As for being disposable, there are numerous teaching positions being advertised, with the increasing amount of ALT jobs being offered, finding a decent, reliable teacher is not quite as easy as it might have been 5 years ago.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Flying_Dutchman

        You have a lot to learn about working in Japan as it seems you feel the world owes you a living.
        duh...

        I think I have probably worked for enough Japanese companies to understand how things work here...

        Owe me a living? nope, I dont remember stating that I was owed a living. What I did comment on, were my feelings that someones salary should increase, or at least not decrease, after they have proven that they are a good worker.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by hikhik
          duh...

          I think I have probably worked for enough Japanese companies to understand how things work here...

          Owe me a living? nope, I dont remember stating that I was owed a living. What I did comment on, were my feelings that someones salary should increase, or at least not decrease, after they have proven that they are a good worker.

          no you are not working for a Japanese companY (as in a regular, cant be fired seishain employee) you are a foreign casual employee ona renewable contract which puts you somewhere bewteen the cleaning lady and the janitor in terms of how valuable you are to your employers.

          Unless you have some unique and indispensible skill that they absoliutely can not replace with another foreigner then your request will be spat out like phlegm.

          Being a good worker is expected of you, its part of your job. Dont expect them to reward you with a hike in salary unless they offer it to you. Asking for more money because you turn up for work on time and keep your nose clean is likely to meet with mildderision at worst and respect for your chutzpah at best. I will add that Japanese workers work twice the hours you do for half the pay. you dont see them complaining.

          I need only remind you that employers are not required to even negotiate with you over salary, much less agree to it. In Japan its take what you are given, in 99% of the cases.

          Comment


          • #6
            Agreed...your salary SHOULD increase if all is well, etc. However, whether it will or not...that's another question all together, right?

            Like you, I don't think it's quite as easy as people seem to think...getting good people for positions. Heck, even getting "so-so" people isn't all that easy anymore. For employers that care about such things, they will already know this. The others? Won't and/or don't care to find out.

            In "normal" situations, a pay raise would be fairly standard. However, these may not be normal situations. Perhaps there is a limit for the position ...one that can't be exceeded, etc.

            If you can't get more money, perhaps you can get some other "benefit"...more time off, etc. Just something else to consider...if you really like the job. Money is, of course, essential. However, other "things" can be equally important. Perhaps flex time, subsidized lunches (depends on the environment you are working in of course), a higher % paid towards health/pension, etc.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Flying_Dutchman
              no you are not working for a Japanese companY (as in a regular, cant be fired seishain employee) you are a foreign casual employee ona renewable contract which puts you somewhere bewteen the cleaning lady and the janitor in terms of how valuable you are to your employers.

              Unless you have some unique and indispensible skill that they absoliutely can not replace with another foreigner then your request will be spat out like phlegm.

              Being a good worker is expected of you, its part of your job. Dont expect them to reward you with a hike in salary unless they offer it to you. Asking for more money because you turn up for work on time and keep your nose clean is likely to meet with mildderision at worst and respect for your chutzpah at best. I will add that Japanese workers work twice the hours you do for half the pay. you dont see them complaining.

              I need only remind you that employers are not required to even negotiate with you over salary, much less agree to it. In Japan its take what you are given, in 99% of the cases.

              FD - Try and be a bit...nicer. Much of your advice is sound...try not to be so argumentative. That's how it's coming across. I'm sure there's a nicer side to you, no?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by hikhik
                As for being disposable, there are numerous teaching positions being advertised, with the increasing amount of ALT jobs being offered, finding a decent, reliable teacher is not quite as easy as it might have been 5 years ago.

                As an ALT you are not a teacher you are a teacher-for hire temporary contracted dispatch worker. ALTs can not teach classes by themselves as its against the law and you are employed by your conversation school boss, not the client school you work at. ALTs are hired guns who can be pulled out of a school on a moments notice.


                There are plenty of positions advertised as the turnover is high, pay is usually abominable and people dont stick around. Doesnt mean that its a great job.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by person
                  FD - Try and be a bit...nicer. Much of your advice is sound...try not to be so argumentative. That's how it's coming across. I'm sure there's a nicer side to you, no?

                  Yes , maybe read the thread this morning. Got wife trouble too.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I guess it comes down to the school.
                    Some schools will hire anyone, and assume they will last a year, then move back to their own country.

                    Some schools prefer to keep the decent teachers for a few years, because its better than losing a teacher, and replacing them with a 23yr old idiot, who is late every monday with a hangover.

                    Also, it depends on location, if you are in Tokyo, I assume there are more than enough candidates to fill every position,
                    if the school is located elsewhere, then it might be obvious to every teacher working there that the school has major issues finding replacement teachers, and in the past they have had a few unreliable teachers who damaged the school with their less than professional behaviour.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Flying_Dutchman
                      As an ALT you are not a teacher you are a teacher-for hire temporary contracted dispatch worker. ALTs can not teach classes by themselves as its against the law and you are employed by your conversation school boss, not the client school you work at. ALTs are hired guns who can be pulled out of a school on a moments notice.


                      There are plenty of positions advertised as the turnover is high, pay is usually abominable and people dont stick around. Doesnt mean that its a great job.
                      Im not an ALT, I was pointing out that as there are a number of ALT positions available at all times, that Eikaiwas are having issues filling their positions, because a lot of the potential workforce are moving to ALT jobs, due to the long holidays and the semi-normal working hours.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Flying_Dutchman
                        Yes , maybe read the thread this morning. Got wife trouble too.
                        My guess is you will have "wife trouble" as long as you have a wife Sorry, but...it's true. The first step is accepting the things we can't change....or changing them.

                        Easier said than done, I know.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Flying_Dutchman
                          no you are not working for a Japanese companY (as in a regular, cant be fired seishain employee) you are a foreign casual employee ona renewable contract which puts you somewhere bewteen the cleaning lady and the janitor in terms of how valuable you are to your employers.
                          That's funny. I remember you claiming that working as a fake priest counted as experience working at a Japanese company.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PanicInducingGaijin
                            That's funny. I remember you claiming that working as a fake priest counted as experience working at a Japanese company.

                            It does when your boss is a Kabushiki Kaisha, and there are maybe 50 employees in kansai. My present company i worked (PT) for 8 years.


                            I dont have some JTE standing over me at least or get yanked off the job because I failed some popularity contest with 8 year olds.

                            what does P.I.G stand for again?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hikhik
                              Im not an ALT, I was pointing out that as there are a number of ALT positions available at all times, that Eikaiwas are having issues filling their positions, because a lot of the potential workforce are moving to ALT jobs, due to the long holidays and the semi-normal working hours.

                              Long holidays yes. Paid vacation, NO. Try finding an ALT job where you are paid for 2 months while you are not working or in a classroom.

                              Comment

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