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  • Breaking contract and giving 1 month notice.

    I found a new job and have to break my contract with the big eikaiwa corporation. When i signed up they said how much it hurts the company and the branch school to give such a short notice, and I really like my job, I just found a better location than where I am at now. What should I do or say to make things go easier?
    Right now I am just gonna tell them and do it 'band-aid' style, rip it straight off!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Cardigan View Post
    I found a new job and have to break my contract with the big eikaiwa corporation. When i signed up they said how much it hurts the company and the branch school to give such a short notice, and I really like my job, I just found a better location than where I am at now. What should I do or say to make things go easier?
    Right now I am just gonna tell them and do it 'band-aid' style, rip it straight off!
    Just the facts - just the facts.

    I (insert your name), hereby resign from (insert company name) with effect from day, month, year.

    Signed, dated, delivered.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are in your second year of your contract 2 weeks notice is all thats required. If they find someone within a week to replace you they will kick your a-ss to the kerb and pretend they dont know you. Dont let their sob stories get to you.

      Comment


      • #4
        I really like my job, I just found a better location than where I am at now.

        The above is all you need to say. These places will toss you without notice or a second thought if it will save them money. Go forth to better fields.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Mr. Ludd View Post
          I really like my job, I just found a better location than where I am at now.

          The above is all you need to say. These places will toss you without notice or a second thought if it will save them money. Go forth to better fields.
          Congratulations!

          Comment


          • #6
            If business was bad for them and they could not afford to pay you, they would terminate you in a heartbeat, without thinking of your personal situation...

            As suggested by others, just write a formal letter of resignation, observing the required notice period. And don't forget your certificate of employment from your soon-to-be-previous employer, it is mandatory that they give you one.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by trip_hop View Post
              If business was bad for them and they could not afford to pay you, they would terminate you in a heartbeat, without thinking of your personal situation...
              Typical hit-first-in-case-they-hit-me mentality of many foreigners in Japan.

              Originally posted by trip_hop View Post
              As suggested by others, just write a formal letter of resignation, observing the required notice period. And don't forget your certificate of employment from your soon-to-be-previous employer, it is mandatory that they give you one.
              True, but I recommend asking for the certificate prior to giving notice.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hml View Post
                Typical hit-first-in-case-they-hit-me mentality of many foreigners in Japan.
                Where's the pre-emption? It's just a basic employer-employee contract. There is no need for the employee to feel guilty.

                In most countries around the world, employers lay off staff without hesitation, as they seek to fix the bottom line. Nothing to do with foreigners in Japan.

                Originally posted by hml View Post
                True, but I recommend asking for the certificate prior to giving notice.
                Isn't that out of sequence! First you resign, then you ask for the certificate.
                It is a mandatory requirement under the labour law, why should the OP be concerned?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cardigan View Post
                  ...When i signed up they said how much it hurts the company and the branch school to give such a short notice....
                  Right. Like they really give a shxt about you. If the school decides it's time for you to go believe me they wouldn't give a damn about how you feel.


                  Originally posted by Cardigan View Post
                  ...Right now I am just gonna tell them and do it 'band-aid' style, rip it straight off!
                  Nothing to it but to do it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    op here

                    So i ended up just telling them what they needed to know. Usually employees give 3 month notice, which is why i felt bad, since i only gave 1 month notice. I baically told them im leaving in a month and told them why. It did not go that well. The head teacher was crying and the manager was completely silent. She was saying that a lot of students will quit and they renewed their contract because of me. It was very overdramatic. The next day they both apologized and since then everything has been business as usual.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thats whats called emotional blackmail. Make you feel guilty as though its your fault sttudents are quitting. If students want to walk with their feet then they are perfectly entitled to do so. No one can make a student continue studying or an employee keep working if they don't want to.

                      Buy a box of tissues for your manager as a going-away present.


                      Originally posted by Cardigan View Post
                      The head teacher was crying and the manager was completely silent. She was saying that a lot of students will quit and they renewed their contract because of me. It was very overdramatic. The next day they both apologized and since then everything has been business as usual.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        With today's flooded market, all they have to do is look out their window for a line of people waiting to take your place. Do not feel guilty about a silent manager (who was probably thinking just those thoughts) or a crying head teacher (who might have had to step down to teach a class or two until they hired someone). The students will easily survive far better than the staff. Heck, there's a whole month before you leave, so they don't need to know until then.

                        If you teach private lessons, you usually get notice that a student is leaving only on the last lesson.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cardigan View Post
                          So i ended up just telling them what they needed to know. Usually employees give 3 month notice, which is why i felt bad, since i only gave 1 month notice. I baically told them im leaving in a month and told them why. It did not go that well. The head teacher was crying and the manager was completely silent. She was saying that a lot of students will quit and they renewed their contract because of me. It was very overdramatic. The next day they both apologized and since then everything has been business as usual.
                          Good of you to leave the feedback, hope some of the posters on this thread read it!

                          Don't forget your certificate of employment, and good luck in your new job!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by trip_hop View Post
                            Where's the pre-emption? It's just a basic employer-employee contract. There is no need for the employee to feel guilty.
                            Sorry. I misread you to say that they would fire you without notice. Some employers do that. Employee shows up for work and they say, you're fired. Leave.


                            Originally posted by trip_hop View Post
                            Isn't that out of sequence! First you resign, then you ask for the certificate.
                            It is a mandatory requirement under the labour law, why should the OP be concerned?
                            I only say they should be concerned because some employers will just give them the bird if asked for the certificate. There are many reasons to request the certificate, but a vengeful employer may simply not issue the certificate after the employee quits - legal or not.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Glenski View Post
                              If you teach private lessons, you usually get notice that a student is leaving only on the last lesson.
                              ...or if he doesn't show up at all and disappears like a ghost.

                              Students sign contracts with the big eikaiwa language schools, not the salaried teachers. If students want to quit, that's on the language school! No need to feel any guilt for giving a month's notice!

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