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Overpriced Crap in Japan!! Can you name a few products?

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  • Overpriced Crap in Japan!! Can you name a few products?

    So I was wondering what you guys notice in Japan that is totally overpriced compared to your home country. Being from the USA I have noticed these things (just a few to start):

    -Coffee makers: 3,000 yen for one for the crappiest ever, a $10 machine in the USA tops

    -make up: my wife says the stuff she buys costs 3x as much here as in the states...for the exact same product

    -toys in general

    -strollers: 50,000 yen for a piece of crap that could be had in the USA for $120

    -beans: yes beans, the kind you soak and cook. 500 yen for a tiny package..at home- 20 plus times more in a package for the same price.

    I think this thread could go for a while. Let's hear some more.

  • #2
    Electricity.

    Water.

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    • #3
      Gym memeberships

      are pretty steep I think

      as are sets of free weights
      Last edited by dangerdog; 2011-02-17, 09:20 PM.

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      • #4
        Fruit

        Qwwwwwwwwww

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        • #5
          All foodstuffs in general are more expensive. Heavy durties are slapped on anything that can possibly be grown in Japan.

          Computer software is more expensive here and what makes it worse is that some features in certain products are disabled in the Japanese versions.

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          • #6
            Ask instead what is cheaper here than their respective counterpart abroad.

            And I'd say booze, cigarettes and most junkfood found at tachigui eataries.

            Edit: ...and the poise of many a gaijinpotters in Japan.
            Last edited by Matti; 2011-02-17, 09:58 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by iago View Post
              Electricity.

              Water.

              Try the UK. You need a bank loan to pay gas and electric, etc..

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Matti View Post
                Ask instead what is cheaper here than their respective counterpart abroad.

                And I'd say booze, cigarettes and most junkfood found at tachigui eataries.

                Income tax - much lower here.

                Health Insurance - painful, but still cheaper than back home.

                City tax - painful, but still cheaper than back home.

                Apples are a rip off, though.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Keeptrying View Post
                  Try the UK. You need a bank loan to pay gas and electric, etc..
                  I don't know... I used to pay for a quarter in the UK what I pay for a month here... That was over ten years ago, though, so I guess things might have changed.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by iago View Post
                    I don't know... I used to pay for a quarter in the UK what I pay for a month here... That was over ten years ago, though, so I guess things might have changed.


                    Um, just a bit...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Keeptrying View Post
                      Income tax - much lower here.

                      Health Insurance - painful, but still cheaper than back home.

                      City tax - painful, but still cheaper than back home.

                      Apples are a rip off, though.
                      In many countries health is a right, not a tax. But I digress. And ask instead you consider the worth of that health tax. Basically you get 70% off overpriced and underperformed service. For a minimum of about 300.000 yen a year.

                      Yah.

                      Anyhow. Let's skip taxes and the likes. Why? Because taxes payed, or not payed, yields different benefits (or lack of) per country and are hard to compare. Whereas things, let's say a pack of milk, are always things no matter where.
                      Last edited by Matti; 2011-02-17, 10:06 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Keeptrying View Post
                        Um, just a bit...
                        Well, let's put it another way, just to clarify... Ten years ago, I used to pay for a quarter in the UK, what I used to pay for a month in Tokyo back then. But maybe the prices in the UK have accelerated out of control?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Matti View Post
                          In many countries health is a right, not a tax.


                          Yeah, but not a free right.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by iago View Post
                            Well, let's put it another way, just to clarify... Ten years ago, I used to pay for a quarter in the UK, what I used to pay for a month in Tokyo back then. But maybe the prices in the UK have accelerated out of control?
                            Yes. Greed rules now. You can't just mosey along to the utility company to pay yer bill like 10 years back. You have to join a 'payment plan' (coz it's too f&cking expensive now to just mosey along...).

                            I'm very happy with my little stove and I don't need no f*cking payment plan for that...!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Matti View Post

                              Anyhow. Let's skip taxes and the likes. Why? Because taxes payed, or not payed, yields different benefits (or lack of) per country and are hard to compare. Whereas things, let's say a pack of milk, are always things no matter where.

                              Clear as mud.

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