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"The Customer Is Always Right", right????

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  • "The Customer Is Always Right", right????

    Fashion Center Rage? or Caveat Venditor?

    Most people would be satisfied with a refund or an exchange, but not this woman.

    About a month ago, a 43-year-old Sapporo woman buys a ƒ^ƒIƒ‹ƒPƒbƒg(towel blanket) from some clothing store. When she gets home, she discovers it's ripped (has a hole in it) so she takes it back the next day. She demands that two of the store's employees get down on their hands and knees and apologize (“y‰ºÀ). She then demands that they write out a statement saying that they will visit her house to apologize once again. While these two employees are doing the Dogeza, she's taking pictures. Later on she tweets the photos along with the two employees' real names and some unflattering comments about their bodies.

    Earlier today, this woman is arrested by police for on suspicion of blackmail (‹­—v—e‹^). Surprsed it took a month.

    ‚µ‚Ü‚Þ‚ç“Xˆõ‚Ɂu“y‰ºÀ v‹­—v@“ŠeŽÒ‚É”ñ“ïŽE“ž A‰Šã‘›‚¬

  • #2
    The store manager should get a slap in the face for allowing the staff to do the dogeza. WTF. "You want us to do the dogeza? Fcuk you, here is your money back and now fark off"

    Hope the customer gets hit by a truck full of comon sense.

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    • #3
      Priceless, i love making a huge deal about my chips at macca's being only 1/2 full, they know when they see me to fill that ____ to the brim.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Xcentrik View Post
        they know when they see me to fill that ____ to the brim.
        You are so cool. Can I have your autograph?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Shimi View Post
          Fashion Center Rage? or Caveat Venditor?


          Earlier today, this woman is arrested by police for on suspicion of blackmail (‹­—v—e‹^). Surprsed it took a month.

          ‚µ‚Ü‚Þ‚ç“Xˆõ‚Ɂu“y‰ºÀ v‹­—v@“ŠeŽÒ‚É”ñ“ïŽE“ž A‰Šã‘›‚¬
          I guess it's the customer's turn to get down on her knees because she's gonna be sodomized, at least financially, as apparently the two bootlicks in that photo have found the inner strength to seek damages. You hate to see people cash in on a woman's natural moodiness but I suppose she did cross the line. If she were a tigress rather than a b*tch she'd garner more sympathy which as a feminist I've always found rather unfair...On the bright side she won't see the inside of a jail cell - don't really understand how her actions constitute 'blackmail' either btw - and she did get her apology (must be teasing herself now for taking it too far).

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          • #6
            A fussy,_____y Shimamura shopper,lol I'm glad they finally got her.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Piethrower View Post

              I guess it's the customer's turn to get down on her knees because she's gonna be sodomized, at least financially, as apparently the two bootlicks in that photo have found the inner strength to seek damages. You hate to see people cash in on a woman's natural moodiness but I suppose she did cross the line. If she were a tigress rather than a b*tch she'd garner more sympathy which as a feminist I've always found rather unfair...On the bright side she won't see the inside of a jail cell - don't really understand how her actions constitute 'blackmail' either btw - and she did get her apology (must be teasing herself now for taking it too far).
              'Blackmail' is just one of the English translations that pops up for '‹­—vß', perhaps in this case it's not one I should have used. However, it does seem like what she did was a bit ‹­—v“I, doesn't it?

              If you look up the Wiki entry for ‹­—vß, it says that the following is an example of such a crime: ŽüˆÍ‚ðŽæ‚èˆÍ‚݁AŽÓß•¶‚ ð‘‚©‚¹‚½. So forcing those employees (by direct or indirect threats) to sign a letter of apology is probably what the police are basing the charges on. She's only been arrested, so perhaps the charge won't stand up in court.

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              • #8
                Its so dump when arbeito or whatever low service providing staff bow down in front of customers because of trivial issues or issues that are not their fault . . . . Ripped towel . . Cmon. My mate works in contruction, roof making . . . When a new roof is build and traditional tiles are posed on the wooden skelet, the guys draw marks on the wood . . . During break my mate drew a Unko picture out of boredom, then the owner came up on the roof by surprise and saw the thing. No harm to the service or build quality this was still nasty and stupid. They bowed down deeper then in thugs infront of the Shogun in those 70. Dramas and the customer put a full bucket of water over tneir heads. Still no friend of bowing for humiliation . . . But well strong contruction guys bowing and getting a water shower in their faces is a good slap . . .. In europe the workers would even spit on the customer.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Shimi View Post
                  'Blackmail' is just one of the English translations that pops up for '‹­—vß', perhaps in this case it's not one I should have used.
                  There's no 'perhaps' about it. Was Bart Simpson 'blackmailed' when his teacher made him write 'I will not draw attention to my spontaneous erection in class' on the blackboard 50 times? Nope, not even in the Japanese subtitles. And in my books a towel with a hole in it is more offensive than a spontaneous erection. I think she has every right to demand an apology without being labeled a blackmailer.

                  Of course where I come from 'a letter of apology' aint worth much more than the post-it it's written on while here in Japan it's not uncommon for an apology to be accompanied by money for added sincerity. Still, that doesn't seem to be the case here. If the b*tch had tried to extort cash from the two employees, say by threatening to post their groveling fat a$$es on Twitter, then and only then could she be charged with blackmail in the English sense of the word which in Japanese would not be ‹­—vß but rather ‹°Š…ß.

                  Gee, I wonder what the fine is for forcing someone to say they're sorry. Or is it only a crime if you pull out pen and paper...

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                  • Shimi
                    Shimi commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Sorry, I wasn't the arresting officer so I don't know the details of why she was arrested on suspicion of 強要罪 and not for 恐喝罪 instead. Maybe since she's Japanese, she's not being charged in the English sense of the word. Besides, one of the definitions of "blackmail" (in the English sense of the word) is "the exertion of pressure or threats, especially unfairly, in an attempt to influence someone's actions." Another (according to Websters) is "the crime of threatening to tell secret information about someone unless the person being threatened gives you money or does what you want" so maybe money doesn't always have to be involved.

                    One online dictionary defines both crimes as 'blackmail' (maybe because the both begin with 'kyou') so go figure.

                    強要罪 http://ejje.weblio.jp/content/%E5%BC...A6%81%E7%BD%AA
                    恐喝罪 http://ejje.weblio.jp/content/%E6%81...96%9D%E7%BD%AA

                    Maybe just pulling out a piece of chalk and rolling out the blackboard could be construed as intimidation (脅迫罪) depending upon how its done, regardless of whether you eventually succeed in forcing them to write 500 times or not.

                    By the way, Act 213 defines 強要 (in the Japanese sense of the word) as "生命、身体、自由、名誉若しくは財産に対し害を加える旨を告知して脅迫し、又は暴行を用いて、人に義務の ないことを行わせ、又は権利の行使を妨害した者は、3年以下の懲役に処する" so maybe they are basing her arrest on the "meiyo" bit. Doesn't mention the amount of any fine, just says up to three years in prison. My guess is that it was the tweeting of not only the photo, but also the real names of the employees that was the straw the broke this camel's back. If she hadn't done that, then probably the police wouldn't have done anything at all.
                    Last edited by Shimi; 2013-10-08, 03:26 PM.

                • #10
                  Yeah, might be a bit extreme, but on the polar opposite, can anyone really say nice things about the customer service in their own home countries?

                  I'm from the U.S., so I can't.

                  You, as the customer, are a nuisance to the worker.

                  The worker whose salary you are paying, I might add.

                  Everyone is standoffish and has got to show that they don't bow to no one!!

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                  • #11
                    @Shimi,
                    OK you've really done your homework, but as enjoyable as brushing up on Japanese law is, my point is/was that only a person using translation software would say the irate shopper is under arrest for 'blackmailing' the two sales clerks.

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                    • Shimi
                      Shimi commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I didn't need to use translation software to read the article, I just couldn't (off the cuff) come up with a single word for 強要罪 so I just looked it up in a JE dictionary. To be honest, I thought 'blackmail' sounded a little weird (based upon what I know from TV cop/law shows) so I looked it up in Websters before I posted my OP. Since according to the them it seems to apply in one English sense of the word, I went with it. However, in hindsight I probably should have just said "arrested on suspicion of making unreasonably excessive demands and exerting pressure possibly involving the making of threats in an unfair manner in an attempt to influence another's action." or even better "coercion". My bad. m(_ _)m
                      Last edited by Shimi; 2013-10-08, 04:16 PM. Reason: Wiping pie off my face :p

                  • #12
                    I can be at peace with coercion. I knew you'd come around to my way of thinking.

                    Comment


                    • Shimi
                      Shimi commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yeah, I figure I'd throw in the towel. You sounded so desperately in need of a victory.

                      Even so, the dictionary (the one which deals with the English senses words) does seem to say that "blackmail" may be acceptable in a broad interpretation of the word. So, lets just say I painted that one with a broad strokes. Regardless, I don' think it's going to matter either way to that Sapporo woman.

                      Live long and prosper.
                      Last edited by Shimi; 2013-10-08, 05:23 PM.
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