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13 dead as Japan endures heatwave...

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  • 13 dead as Japan endures heatwave...

    Not that I am not sorry for the dead but really, what is it with Japan? People are said to have been 'killled' by the heat. Really?

    I come from a city and state where summer temperatures of 40 to even 45 degrees celsius are hardly unknown.

    Nobody 'dies' from heatwaves there. Maybe it's down to the fact that they know not to do stupid things in extreme heat.

    Yes, I know some old people died in the heat in Japan but why don't they die in my state when it becomes extreme? Not every body uses an air conditioner there, either.

    It seems like another case of failure to think. If typhoons hit my city and state nobody would go outside and repair things or go walking near rivers, seas etc. That the Japanese do these things says it all.

  • #2
    What state do you live in? Denial?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by caramellocap
      Not that I am not sorry for the dead but really, what is it with Japan? People are said to have been 'killled' by the heat. Really?

      I come from a city and state where summer temperatures of 40 to even 45 degrees celsius are hardly unknown.

      Nobody 'dies' from heatwaves there. Maybe it's down to the fact that they know not to do stupid things in extreme heat.

      Yes, I know some old people died in the heat in Japan but why don't they die in my state when it becomes extreme? Not every body uses an air conditioner there, either.

      It seems like another case of failure to think. If typhoons hit my city and state nobody would go outside and repair things or go walking near rivers, seas etc. That the Japanese do these things says it all.
      What about the humidity in 'your state'? Anything like it is here?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Since1990
        What about the humidity in 'your state'? Anything like it is here?
        I am from Florida but this weather in Tokyo seems way worse then back home. I am not sure why because Florida is really humid as well, maybe there is a lot more cement here in the city so it gets a lot hotter?

        Comment


        • #5
          Back in....1995??, many people died in Chicago during the heat of the summer. It was rather shameful. As a result of this, there are now systems in place for when the temperature gets high. The problem was that (and is still that) many old people are on fixed incomes. They try to save money by not using the A/C and/or fans. They are old and vulnerable. Many don't have family and/or friends to check on them. So....things like the 1995 incident occur.

          Ironically, what many old people don't seem to know is that, if your income is low, you can actually get help with your utilities (at least in the State of IL). This was even BEFORE 1995. If they knew this, they might be more inclined to use them...thus, preventing disasters like that from occuring in the first place.

          Further, when people are old (and wearing there MANY layers of clothes....have you seen some of the old people in JP? They wear liners -- like long underwear -- under their pants even in f'n 35 degree heat...and it's not just to absorb the sweat) -- back to my point -- when people are old, they may not realize how hot their bodies actually are (maybe they are not sweating, maybe they fall asleep, etc.).

          At any rate, I stayed away at school during the summer of 1995. Though it was good for me (tanning as I did), there were dire consequences in Chicago. And I assure you, Chicago is the US' 3rd biggest city. It's certainly not lacking in much so there's no reason this should have happened...but it did. I'll venture a guess and say it happens many places -- didn't France have many problems a few years ago???

          Comment


          • #6
            I have felt better in Sahara than in Tokyo. At least during the night and the morning, Sahara is cool and fresh. Unbelievable.

            The most horrible thing is the water wasting splashing ceremony. Is this recycled water or do they use tap water for splashing water on the concrete? It makes no sense, as it does not make any difference.

            Comment


            • #7
              I feel sorry..

              ..for that 13 year old kid who died in Machida the other day after bukatsu practice. I can't decide if it's stupid, tragic, criminal, or a combination of all 3. Japanese society chews up & spits out yet another.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jacque_S
                ..for that 13 year old kid who died in Machida the other day after bukatsu practice. I can't decide if it's stupid, tragic, criminal, or a combination of all 3. Japanese society chews up & spits out yet another.
                What is bukatsu? Please explain what happened.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by person
                  What is bukatsu? Please explain what happened.
                  Kid collapsed after club activities. 1st year JHS. Probably doing the usual pointless b.s. What a waste. Ah, Japan. Ah, humanity.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's very effective actually

                    Originally posted by Ellenika
                    The most horrible thing is the water wasting splashing ceremony. Is this recycled water or do they use tap water for splashing water on the concrete? It makes no sense, as it does not make any difference.
                    It is no ceremony and it makes every difference! It can lower the temperature in the general area by a few degrees if enough people do it. We spash bath water on our concrete verander so that our apartment don't heat up as much.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Heat wave kills 37 in South, Midwest By BETH RUCKER, Associated Press Writer
                      18 minutes ago



                      Residents across the South and Midwest were hopeful that the weekend would bring some relief from brutal temperatures that have killed more than three dozen people and set records for power demand.

                      Forecasters expected temperatures in Memphis and other parts of the Mississippi Valley on Friday to drop slightly, into the 90s, a relief from several consecutive days of triple digits.

                      In Tennessee, the Shelby County medical examiner's office confirmed Thursday that heat caused the death of a 53-year-old man found in his apartment the day before, bringing the death toll in Memphis alone to eight.

                      In all, 37 deaths in the South and Midwest have been confirmed as heat-related, and heat is suspected in 10 more, authorities said.

                      The Tennessee Valley Authority, the nation's largest public utility, shut down one of three units at the Browns Ferry nuclear plant in Athens, Ala., on Thursday because water drawn from the Tennessee River was exceeding a 90-degree average over 24 hours.

                      "We don't believe we've ever shut down a nuclear unit because of river temperature," said John Moulton, spokesman for the Knoxville, Tenn.-based utility.

                      The shutdown posed no safety threat, but it came as TVA hit records for power consumption in the last two weeks in its service area covering most of Tennessee and parts of Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia.

                      The utility will compensate for the loss of power by buying it elsewhere.

                      In north-central Arkansas, the temperature reached 112 degrees on Wednesday in a place called Evening Shade.

                      "It's miserable," said Sharp County Judge Larry Brown, the county's chief administrative officer. Road crews were working shorter hours, "coming in early and leaving at noon. By then it's already way over 100 anyway," Brown said.

                      At midafternoon Thursday it was 107, Brown said. "It's still like an oven," he said.

                      Emergency physicians warned that days of heat-related stress can lead to problems such as nausea, dizziness, headaches, cramps and vomiting for people who otherwise are healthy. Those symptoms are the first signs of heat exhaustion.

                      "It is a cumulative thing," said Dr. Franc Fenaughty, an emergency room physician in the Memphis suburb of Germantown. "After four or five or six days you are going to see more people get dehydrated. And, the big problem is dehydration."

                      Untreated, heat exhaustion can lead to heat stroke, which often causes death or disability. A fever of 101 degrees or higher, especially for older people, is cause for concern, and fever of 103.5 or more is considered an emergency.

                      "Every day the risk rises for those people who haven't had a break from the heat," said Dr. Mary Ellen McIntire, of the Baptist Minor Medical Centers.

                      There were nine confirmed deaths in Missouri, eight confirmed deaths in Illinois, four each in Arkansas and Georgia, two in South Carolina and one in Mississippi, as well as one death in Tennessee outside Memphis.

                      Last summer, a heat wave killed at least 50 people in the Midwest and East. California officially reported a death toll of 143, but authorities last month acknowledged the number may have been far higher. A 1995 heat wave in Chicago was blamed for 700 deaths.

                      END

                      Happens everywhere....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ellenika
                        I have felt better in Sahara than in Tokyo. At least during the night and the morning, Sahara is cool and fresh. Unbelievable.

                        The most horrible thing is the water wasting splashing ceremony. Is this recycled water or do they use tap water for splashing water on the concrete? It makes no sense, as it does not make any difference.
                        I'll avoid too much tech talk, (MRT, effective temperature, etc.)

                        The temperature you feel is basically the air temperature PLUS the infrared heat coming off your surroundings (walls, ashpahlt, the sky). Throwing water on the sidewalks DOES reduce that extra heat. Doing it in the middle of the day maybe only lasts a couple minutes, but in the afternoon, it can help a few degrees for the rest of the evening.

                        Water is cheap, way cheaper than air conditioning. If we could drench a whole city in water every summer afternoon, the nights would be cooler, and tons of savings would be had on air conditioning.

                        As far as heat wave deaths in civilized countries, France holds the record I think, something like 50,000 people dead a few years ago. Ridiculous. Main problem was not even the hospitals had A/C.
                        Last edited by Kogaku; 2007-08-17, 07:27 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          And there is also a mindset - which is my point

                          Stupid comment about state of denial - just because older and old people happen to be smart enough and think outside the box in my country to wear few clothes inside their houses even if they don't have an airconditioner in the middle of tremendous heatwaves, doesn't mean you automatically go on the attack about that point.

                          All the responses so far confirm for me something - people in some countries sometimes have set ways of thinking about
                          how to deal with challenges. I have not heard of anybody dying of the massive heatwaves that distinguish my city's summer months. Even in housing with no airconditioners. Most likely because these people think for themselves and can change their thinking according to the circumstances.

                          More Japanese houses/apartments than not have airconditioners. I think it boils down to ingrained habits that under different circumstances express themselves in wandering around near sources of water during typhoons or trying to fix things during typhoons. The death toll in typhoons always includes that element.

                          Same as the glass flying into people inside their own houses. The first year I was in Japan there was a big typhoon - even as somebody new to Japan I realised that to sleep near shakey glass windows was as good as killing myself if something happened. As it was one of them shattered (there were no typhoon/rain shutters) and I could have suffered the same fate as a few who died by flying glass had I not used my reason.

                          As for France - that's down to living in decrepit apartments with little ventilation, shared bathroom facilities sometimes, and few windows. Conditions bordering semi primitive for a country whose citizens like to think their way of life is superior.

                          But yet again - if you do live in those conditions then there had better be some thinking outside the box whether by the occupants or their local govt. Again my point is - in the absence of individual action then somebody else has to be concerned.

                          Having 'endured' the Japanese heat for 7 years, even with the humidity, I'd say it's nothing like the wall of heat that hits you with a heatwave where temperatures regularly are 37 and can climb to 45.
                          Last edited by caramellocap; 2007-08-19, 10:28 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think Jacquie is being unfair. That 13 year old kid is a real tragedy, but it could have been a defective ticker or something. Bukatsudo in that sort of heat would indeed be ridiculous, but I can think of more than a few PE coaches I had that would pull exactly the same sort of crap. Nobody dies where we're from because it never gets hot enough.

                            People die in heat waves. Most are older, and simply succumb. Not that that means the authorities shouldn't advise people to take it easy. It sounds like Japan is doing rather well if only 13 have died.

                            After all, there are a whole hell of a lot of Japanese. Attention to absolute numbers in these sorts of events is a silly tendency. If anything bugs me about Japan, it's their tendency to use absolute measures that give no relative picture. They're as stupid as Amoronikan News channels that way.

                            Just because we're modern doesn't mean we're not mortal. Natural selection may well have been socialised over the centuries, but that doesn't mean it is defunct.

                            CCP,

                            are you from a humid place. Remember, it's not the heat, it's the.................... you know the rest.

                            And if you are tired of fargin air conditioners, try a cold bath or shower.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I think it may mostly be a question of IF the news tells the story or not. If the news says "people die from heat", then people talk about it.

                              People die in traffic accidents all the time yet drive everyday.

                              Lightning probably kills more people than heat does, yet the news doesn't report it... (well with the numbers in france so high I doubt lightning kills the french as well as the heat but I reckon you get my drift)

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