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Reality for Japan and especially Tohoku

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  • Reality for Japan and especially Tohoku

    There is some great material about Japan in today’s Japan Times. An excellent, realistic look at what is going in Sendai, that serves as an example for Tohoku.Tha article needs no comment:

    TOHOKU BUBBLE, Tohoku in rebuilding bubble

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20120327i1.html#

    There are two more arrticles connected to the subject, one is about Mr Nodas insight that it is neither the earthquakes, nor the tsunamis, that are a threat to japan’s nuclear power plants. No, on a level that would honor any Georg B. he tells a surprised nation: It is the terrorists! As we know about people like him, it is certainly the foreigners….

    And the the third one shows the brilliance of japan’s academia. One single professor warns Tokyo that he has discovered two „new“ fault lines, several hundred km to the south that are threatening Tokyo with a big one and, of course, a Fukushima sized tsunami.
    Now, one may have compassion with the average Tanaka-san of this country that he prays, that someone may be able to actually predict a major earthquake, but a university professor ought to know better. Not to mention that a 12 year old can see that there is not enough water in the Tokyo Bay to cause a tsunmai of the March 11 category….

    But…. Lets be grateful to Mr Eric Johnston that his article got published.

  • #2
    Originally posted by John Grey View Post
    There is some great material about Japan in today’s Japan Times. .....
    An oxymoron (plural oxymorons or oxymora) (from Greek ὀξύμωρον, "sharp dull") is a figure of speech that combines contradictory terms. Oxymorons appear in a variety of contexts, including inadvertent errors such as ground pilot and literary oxymorons crafted to reveal a paradox.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by John Grey View Post
      .... Not to mention that a 12 year old can see that there is not enough water in the Tokyo Bay to cause a tsunmai of the March 11 category…. .
      Oh - really? Just how much water is in Tokyo Bay, and how much do you think would be needed to create a tsunami of 17 meters? How much water was in the bays affected by the 3.11 tsunamis?

      Given that the faults are over 100km away, and have cliffs of 2000 and 3000 meters - that is a whole lot of potential and ocean water that can push up Tokyo Bay. It only takes a few meters of water to wreck devastation. If that is your take on the article and discovery, then I'd say that you are in close competition for the critical thinking ability and perspective of a 12 year old... but then I'd be disparaging most 12 year olds.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by TJrandom View Post
        Oh - really? Just how much water is in Tokyo Bay, and how much do you think would be needed to create a tsunami of 17 meters? How much water was in the bays affected by the 3.11 tsunamis?

        Given that the faults are over 100km away, and have cliffs of 2000 and 3000 meters - that is a whole lot of potential and ocean water that can push up Tokyo Bay. It only takes a few meters of water to wreck devastation. If that is your take on the article and discovery, then I'd say that you are in close competition for the critical thinking ability and perspective of a 12 year old... but then I'd be disparaging most 12 year olds.

        As another reminder, John Grey, you seem to be reverting back to the old habit of bringing up intelligence this and intelligence that. Maybe not the best idea.

        And the the third one shows the brilliance of japan’s academia. One single professor warns Tokyo that he has discovered two „new“ fault lines, several hundred km to the south that are threatening Tokyo with a big one and, of course, a Fukushima sized tsunami.
        Now, one may have compassion with the average Tanaka-san of this country that he prays, that someone may be able to actually predict a major earthquake, but a university professor ought to know better.


        It is my understanding that the team will be investigating further. http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20120327a1.html In the article, nothing outrageous was stated, imo.

        Several of my colleagues have actually invented things. Imagine that. Some do so in teams, others go it alone. One single professor here has invented a pretty nifty process (can't tell you without revealing myself) all by himself that will save a lot of people. He has given it away, no less. Before you disparage academics so quickly, how about joining our world? Some of us are burdened with piles of paperwork and meetings, plus a heavy course load, yet we still manage to publish good stuff and find enough time to imagine neat things that become reality and influence your world.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Super Grover View Post
          ..... yet we still manage to publish good stuff and find enough time to imagine neat things that become reality and influence your world.
          ... like Koogle ....and shoe mirrors!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by thefg
            nope sorry this is completely incorrect


            Tokyo is protected by its bay from a large tsunami, you just dont have enough volume of water or distance to enable a suitably large sized wave to be created. Wave theory is simple and very well understood. You need distance for such a low frequency wave to develop the tsunamis are dangerous becaause they happen way out at sea where they have a long time distance to fully develop a wave before that wave hits shallower waters where it starts to rise. This process is halted by any landmass in the way of the wave - ie tokyo is protected from a large tsunami of the type that caused such destruction in fukushima
            If you are saying that these particular faults - would affect other areas more (Chiba Pacific coast) - then I would agree - but the simulation I saw on TV for these particular faults - still showed Tokyo tsunami effect, but at a lower height.

            The length of Tokyo bay does not protect Tokyo from a Tsunami. On my wall, I have charts that show projected tsunami impacts for large parts of the waterfront areas near Shimbashi, Ginza, etc., and further up the rivers and canals – estimated to be between 50 and 100 meters. (No sh_t.) The shallower the area – the higher the tsunami. These charts were not made for these newly discovered faults – but instead for faults off of Tokyo bay and Izu.

            http://www1.kaiho.mlit.go.jp/KAN3/bo...an-shinnyu.pdf

            and

            http://www1.kaiho.mlit.go.jp/KAN3/bo...kai.htm#Jtokyo

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            • #7
              Originally posted by thefg
              nope sorry this is completely incorrect


              Tokyo is protected by its bay from a large tsunami, you just dont have enough volume of water or distance to enable a suitably large sized wave to be created. Wave theory is simple and very well understood. You need distance for such a low frequency wave to develop the tsunamis are dangerous becaause they happen way out at sea where they have a long time distance to fully develop a wave before that wave hits shallower waters where it starts to rise. This process is halted by any landmass in the way of the wave - ie tokyo is protected from a large tsunami of the type that caused such destruction in fukushima
              So, in theory the Boso and Izu penninsulas should protect Tokyo from any large tsunami. But what about a tsunami that was formed by a movement of the plates under Tokyo Bay? Granted such a wave may only reach a heigth of 5 meters but won't that be enough to cause a lot of damage to Tokyo's infrastructure as well as loss of utilities, life and such?

              Take a look at the map below, the black is sea level, the brown are highlands and the varying shades of blue are variations from 1-10 meters above sea level. Superimpose that over a population map and you'll see that 70% of Metropolitan Tokyo is just above sea level.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by well_bicyclically View Post
                ... like Koogle ....and shoe mirrors!
                Don't you mean Kugel?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by well_bicyclically View Post
                  ... like Koogle ....and shoe mirrors!
                  Please, sir! I was thinking more along the lines of the Cone of Silence, the shoe phone and tricorders. Well, how about neat ways of using silica dust and diamond dust to enhance shoe mirrors!!

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                  • #10
                    With last year's disaster, we saw three separate earthquakes that happened in such a way that the second and third earthquakes amplified already moving waves. If the epicenters are in the correct place and happen at the "right" time, you could easily end up with much of Tokyo under water. However, I imagine that the peninsula where Yokosuka is located would prevent massive walls of water from reaching Tokyo in their original form. The wave energy would have to go around a corner and that would reduce its ability to do as much damage.

                    imo

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by edin日本 View Post
                      Don't you mean Kugel?


                      not at all!!
                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPSnDwBDhsQ

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TJrandom View Post
                        On my wall, I have charts that show projected tsunami impacts for large parts of the waterfront areas near Shimbashi, Ginza, etc.,

                        On my wall I have a poster of naked Demi Moore. One of us is weird....

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by HarryHurry View Post
                          On my wall I have a poster of naked Demi Moore. One of us is weird....
                          Ah, yes... - any guess as to which one of us it might be?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by thefg
                            no you couldnt, there simply isnt enough space nor the right topography
                            ... and Tokyo people are generally as (up)tight as a frog's bum so, no worries....

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