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  • Apartment Recommendations!

    Hey guys, I'll be coming to Tokyo in a couple of months and I really need a decent apartment!
    Can you guys recommend any? Of course Sakura House is out.
    These are my criteria:
    -No Roaches or Rats
    -Very Clean
    -Hot Water
    -Internet
    -In Tokyo pref. only 30mins away from Shinjuku
    -70,000Yen to 100,000 Yen only
    -1K apartment

  • #2
    Well, I doubt anyone can just recommend you a specific apartment, but....

    My first suggestion assumes you have an optimal situation:

    1. You can speak Japanese
    2. You have a Guarantor OR have a sufficient salary/bank balance to qualify with a guarantor company.
    3. You can pay a few month's rent upon moving in for all the deposits, agency fees and key money etc.

    If so, I recommend surfing around Suumo and At Home. They both have ’Κ‹Ξ / ’ΚŠwŽžŠΤ search options.


    Now, if my first suggestion doesn't apply to you, I recommend Tokyo Rent, Hikari Homes or Leo Palace (in that order). They're fairly gaijin friendly and don't seem to screw you over as much as Oakhouse or Sakura House.

    Whichever suggestion is for you, communicate with the rental agencies and pick a few places you want to look at before you come so you can go view apartments as soon as you arrive. The less money you spend on hotels/hostels/etc while you shop around for a place, the more money you'll have to pimp out your new digs.

    That being said...

    –Any rental agency you talk to at this point will likely just tell you - in very polite terms - 'we don't want anything to do with you until a month before you intend to move in.'
    –I don't know how much you know about Japanese apartments, but the vast majority of them have absolutely nothing in them besides an AC unit. Plan to buy a fridge, gas range, bed, etc.


    These are just general suggestions as you didn't mention anything about what you'll be doing in Japan or any pertinent personal info like how old you are. Although, I did notice that you hijacked someone else's thread on a similar topic and this thread is just a copy-paste of that post.


    EDIT: P.S. I hope your 70,000-100,000 yen budget doesn't include utilities and internet/TV.
    Last edited by engemoui; 2012-08-04, 09:00 PM. Reason: Had an afterthought!

    Comment


    • #3
      fridges and etc.

      Originally posted by engemoui View Post
      My first suggestion assumes you have an optimal situation:

      1. You can speak Japanese
      2. You have a Guarantor OR have a sufficient salary/bank balance to qualify with a guarantor company.
      3. You can pay a few month's rent upon moving in for all the deposits, agency fees and key money etc.

      If so, I recommend surfing around Suumo and At Home. They both have ’Κ‹Ξ / ’ΚŠwŽžŠΤ search options.


      Now, if my first suggestion doesn't apply to you, I recommend Tokyo Rent, Hikari Homes or Leo Palace (in that order). They're fairly gaijin friendly and don't seem to screw you over as much as Oakhouse or Sakura House.

      Whichever suggestion is for you, communicate with the rental agencies and pick a few places you want to look at before you come so you can go view apartments as soon as you arrive. The less money you spend on hotels/hostels/etc while you shop around for a place, the more money you'll have to pimp out your new digs.

      That being said...

      –Any rental agency you talk to at this point will likely just tell you - in very polite terms - 'we don't want anything to do with you until a month before you intend to move in.'
      –I don't know how much you know about Japanese apartments, but the vast majority of them have absolutely nothing in them besides an AC unit. Plan to buy a fridge, gas range, bed, etc.


      These are just general suggestions as you didn't mention anything about what you'll be doing in Japan or any pertinent personal info like how old you are. Although, I did notice that you hijacked someone else's thread on a similar topic and this thread is just a copy-paste of that post.


      EDIT: P.S. I hope your 70,000-100,000 yen budget doesn't include utilities and internet/TV.
      How much would those cost me? The fridges and sa smaill table for my laptop and eating. Ofcourse a bed.

      Comment


      • #4
        This is coming from someone in almost the exact same position as you're in. I came to Tokyo July the 3rd and currently staying in an Oak House Guesthouse. Rent is 80,00 JPY per month. They have hot water, kitchen, wireless internet (DMZ internet....) and it's an single room guest house and I'm currently living in a room that is as small as 2 toilet rooms. Not a joke.

        I'm planning to move and have already reserved an apartment that will cost me 47,000 JPY per month but have to pay 3 months up front. Not a big deal. 141,000JPY I got it. However I would have moved by the end of July and been in that apartment if it just wasn't for my bad timing with applying a student visa. Applied the 6th and I'm still waiting for it in order to get my Student Visa, Resident's Card, Health Insurance Card and my happy apartment (mansion, 29sqmeters). Now, I actually asked the real estate agent and he said it won't come with stoves and so on.

        You can easily get an fridge for around 33,000 JPY + 35L (Shop in Akihabara).

        If you can live with sleeping on the floor with a futon then it can cost from 1,000JPY +4

        And as for table, I have no idea. I'm currently searching for a Japanese style table myself. You can save money with the laundry if you have a bath tub or a shower, you just buy powder detergent or liquid detergent and wash it in there. As for Stove I don't know either.

        Also eating is something you'll have to consider for yourself. I'm a poor student and have my money, that's it.

        Weekdays Monday - Friday:

        1DAY : 220 JPY + 398 JPY + 100 JPY. = 7/11 Sandwich (Morning/Lunch) + 7/11 Bento (Dinner) + Vending Machine Drink (Dinner). Not healthy, but until I've payed for my apartment this is what I do. I'm still growing and yes I can live with it but it's not healthy and I'm going to eat a load once I've moved. By cooking.

        Saturday - Sunday:

        4x 68 JPY + 398 JPY + 398 JPY + 398 JPY + 398 JPY. Water, water, water, water 2L x 4. bento, bento, bento, bento. 2 bentos per day on Saturday and Sunday.

        How well can you handle your sweet tooth and drinking habits if you have any?
        Last edited by ApplesDaMan; 2012-08-05, 02:04 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ApplesDaMan View Post
          This is coming from someone in almost the exact same position as you're in. I came to Tokyo July the 3rd and currently staying in an Oak House Guesthouse. Rent is 80,00 JPY per month. They have hot water, kitchen, wireless internet (DMZ internet....) and it's an single room guest house and I'm currently living in a room that is as small as 2 toilet rooms. Not a joke.

          I'm planning to move and have already reserved an apartment that will cost me 47,000 JPY per month but have to pay 3 months up front. Not a big deal. 141,000JPY I got it. However I would have moved by the end of July and been in that apartment if it just wasn't for my bad timing with applying a student visa. Applied the 6th and I'm still waiting for it in order to get my Student Visa, Resident's Card, Health Insurance Card and my happy apartment (mansion, 29sqmeters). Now, I actually asked the real estate agent and he said it won't come with stoves and so on.

          You can easily get an fridge for around 33,000 JPY + 35L (Shop in Akihabara).

          If you can live with sleeping on the floor with a futon then it can cost from 1,000JPY +4

          And as for table, I have no idea. I'm currently searching for a Japanese style table myself. You can save money with the laundry if you have a bath tub or a shower, you just buy powder detergent or liquid detergent and wash it in there. As for Stove I don't know either.

          Also eating is something you'll have to consider for yourself. I'm a poor student and have my money, that's it.

          Weekdays Monday - Friday:

          1DAY : 220 JPY + 398 JPY + 100 JPY. = 7/11 Sandwich (Morning/Lunch) + 7/11 Bento (Dinner) + Vending Machine Drink (Dinner). Not healthy, but until I've payed for my apartment this is what I do. I'm still growing and yes I can live with it but it's not healthy and I'm going to eat a load once I've moved. By cooking.

          Saturday - Sunday:

          4x 68 JPY + 398 JPY + 398 JPY + 398 JPY + 398 JPY. Water, water, water, water 2L x 4. bento, bento, bento, bento. 2 bentos per day on Saturday and Sunday.

          How well can you handle your sweet tooth and drinking habits if you have any?
          How did you find a cheap and big apartment? What real estate agency do you recommend?

          Comment


          • #6
            I recommend Bridge Life Real Estates. They have English speaking staff and so on however there are some catches.

            Until you've actually come to Japan, it might be hard for you to sign a contract. The reason why is because you need the documents. A valid VISA, Resident's Card and proof of income or some proof that you can support yourself for at least 3months +.

            Since I'm on a scholarship and actually have the document to prove that, I get to pay the low cost of 47,000 JPY per month in this apartment. Without having that scholarship I would had to pay for agency fee, key fee and a lot of other fees that was just gut wrenching high.

            I tried the Tokyo Rent site too but the furniture would not come with the apartment and had to pay extra. You need to be patient, look around, talk to as many real estates as you can. Try to get a guarantor if you can, I was allowed to use my school as reference and guarantor.

            I tried AghartA too but you need to pay a big amount of agency fee and it's a plus to be 21+ in their view.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ApplesDaMan View Post
              I recommend Bridge Life Real Estates. They have English speaking staff and so on however there are some catches.

              Until you've actually come to Japan, it might be hard for you to sign a contract. The reason why is because you need the documents. A valid VISA, Resident's Card and proof of income or some proof that you can support yourself for at least 3months +.

              Since I'm on a scholarship and actually have the document to prove that, I get to pay the low cost of 47,000 JPY per month in this apartment. Without having that scholarship I would had to pay for agency fee, key fee and a lot of other fees that was just gut wrenching high.

              I tried the Tokyo Rent site too but the furniture would not come with the apartment and had to pay extra. You need to be patient, look around, talk to as many real estates as you can. Try to get a guarantor if you can, I was allowed to use my school as reference and guarantor.

              I tried AghartA too but you need to pay a big amount of agency fee and it's a plus to be 21+ in their view.
              What I am planning to do is reserve while I am still in my country and then sign when I get there. Do I need a guarantor for bridgelife? Because I saw their units and it's quite nice. I would be supported by my parents.

              Comment


              • #8
                It depends on the agent, area and apartment or mansion you're trying to rent. You'll have to e-mail them about the specific one.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ApplesDaMan View Post
                  It depends on the agent, area and apartment or mansion you're trying to rent. You'll have to e-mail them about the specific one.
                  Do you know other agencies that are as good as bridge?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Any other?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      kencorp.com is rather upscale. You can also get cheap furniture from other gaijin leaving Japan in 'sayonara sales' (check metropolis.co.jp or craigslist). Keep in mind that most apartments have a minimum rental period of 2 years.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        any other?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Might want to investigate some UR agents. Since UR is a semi-governmental corporation, no key money, no agent fee (agent gets a kickback from UR), and can break the lease on only 2 weeks notice.

                          Prices are approximately market-rates and buildings typically not new (but maintained well), but the initial move-in expense is low.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by kafkareich View Post
                            any other?
                            We still don't know HOW LONG you will stay in Tokyo. For short-term stays, a furnished apartment such as Oakwood , Leopalace 21 or Mori Living is recommended. 'Gaijin Houses' are at the bottom of this with usually shared kitchen/bath.

                            If you want to stay 2 years, you should go through the normal process with a real estate agent (many have also online sites, stepone, chintai,..), but it is not a good idea to rent a place without having looked at it first. Usually, real estate agents (same as marriage agencies) show you the 'bottom of the list' first (overpriced, loud, dark, old,...). Plan some 3-4 weeks for this and stay the first month in a hotel or furnished apartment.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              One thing that I might add to this dicussion (BUT I'M NOT 100% SURE ON) is that some agents will need to see a level of income sufficient to pay for the rent fee.

                              From the Bridge Life FAQ on their website, they ask for 4 times the cost of the rent as 'provable' income. That would mean for a 50,000 yen per month apartment, you would need an income of 200,000 yen per month (I believe 250,000 is the set rate). You might also find this as a hinderance to renting with other companies.

                              I WOULD LIKE TO ADD THE ABOVE AS A QUESTION: For those renting, did you need to prove your income? How much did they ask to see? How did you prove it? (letter?) What agent did you use?

                              I live in a company apartment, so I didn't even get asked any of those sorts of things. HR did everything for me. However, I think this question might be very relevant to the OP and perhaps to me - say if I want a very expensive apartment (150k or so).

                              Comment

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