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  • Can we survive?

    I was just offered a position in Oyama City, Tochigi with a monthly salary of 250k yen. The only cost I know for sure is that the apartment is 45k yen/month. I also know that health insurance will be covered. I would not be using a car at all, as the apartment is located within walking distance of the school.

    While looking through the forums and good 'ol Google, I had a very difficult time finding a general summarizing of living costs. It seems to me that it is feasible for me and my wife to live on that salary, but God forbid I am understanding things incorrectly...

    I was wondering if, in your experience, that monthly salary is enough to support two people?

    I don't mean to 'repost', but again, all the information I was getting was erratic, from a huge range of time (2005-2012) and/or for one of the extreme regions (Tokyo or countryside).

    Thanks for any info.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Zhornbe View Post
    I was just offered a position in Oyama City, Tochigi with a monthly salary of 250k yen. The only cost I know for sure is that the apartment is 45k yen/month. I also know that health insurance will be covered. I would not be using a car at all, as the apartment is located within walking distance of the school.

    While looking through the forums and good 'ol Google, I had a very difficult time finding a general summarizing of living costs. It seems to me that it is feasible for me and my wife to live on that salary, but God forbid I am understanding things incorrectly...

    I was wondering if, in your experience, that monthly salary is enough to support two people?

    I don't mean to 'repost', but again, all the information I was getting was erratic, from a huge range of time (2005-2012) and/or for one of the extreme regions (Tokyo or countryside).

    Thanks for any info.
    Once they take out taxes figure anywhere from 230 to 240 a month. The apartment at 45K a month, if utilities are paid then not so bad but they are probably not. If the wife can work, she better look for some/ It is doable but you all will get tired of scrimping and scrimping. However if you can get some part time extra work or some privates. You all will be ok, would be really hard if it was Tokyo which is a lot more expensive! Probably will not be able to save any thing on that salary!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Zhornbe View Post
      I was just offered a position in Oyama City, Tochigi with a monthly salary of 250k yen. The only cost I know for sure is that the apartment is 45k yen/month. I also know that health insurance will be covered. I would not be using a car at all, as the apartment is located within walking distance of the school.

      While looking through the forums and good 'ol Google, I had a very difficult time finding a general summarizing of living costs. It seems to me that it is feasible for me and my wife to live on that salary, but God forbid I am understanding things incorrectly...

      I was wondering if, in your experience, that monthly salary is enough to support two people?

      I don't mean to 'repost', but again, all the information I was getting was erratic, from a huge range of time (2005-2012) and/or for one of the extreme regions (Tokyo or countryside).

      Thanks for any info.
      To be perfectly honest, you will be able to make your monthly expenses, but you will be living from paycheck to paycheck. You really will not be able to go out and enjoy Japan because wil you have very little or no money left over. You will have to take another job or get some private students to be able to save any money. Even then, it wont be much. Scimping and saving gets really old, really fast. My advise to you is to turn down this job and look for something with a higher salary. Anything less than 300000 yen a month is pretty much a joke for a salary. As of for your health insurance, you are probably getting shakai hoken which means that your company will cover half or your health insurance, pension and unemployment insurance. The other half you will have to pay. Its standard here in Japan. However, if you are working less than 30 hours per week, they you have to pay the whole thing. I would verify this if I were you.

      In summary, you will be able to survive and pay your bills. However, that`s about it. Not much of a life is it?

      Good luck with your decision.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you both, I really appreciate the information and outlook. I decided not to accept the offer, and have actually turned my gaze to countries with lower costs of living, like Korea, and feel like I am having much better luck there. Hopefully we will be able to live comfortably, I can gain a little experience, and then we can transfer to Japan (or anywhere else!) once my qualifications demand a bit higher of a salary.

        Again, thank you so much. Really was helpful.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Zhornbe View Post
          Thank you both, I really appreciate the information and outlook. I decided not to accept the offer, and have actually turned my gaze to countries with lower costs of living, like Korea, and feel like I am having much better luck there. Hopefully we will be able to live comfortably, I can gain a little experience, and then we can transfer to Japan (or anywhere else!) once my qualifications demand a bit higher of a salary.

          Again, thank you so much. Really was helpful.
          I actually live in Oyama. What is the name of the company? Feel free to PM me.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Zhornbe View Post
            I was just offered a position in Oyama City, Tochigi with a monthly salary of 250k yen. The only cost I know for sure is that the apartment is 45k yen/month. I also know that health insurance will be covered. I would not be using a car at all, as the apartment is located within walking distance of the school.

            While looking through the forums and good 'ol Google, I had a very difficult time finding a general summarizing of living costs. It seems to me that it is feasible for me and my wife to live on that salary, but God forbid I am understanding things incorrectly...

            I was wondering if, in your experience, that monthly salary is enough to support two people?

            I don't mean to 'repost', but again, all the information I was getting was erratic, from a huge range of time (2005-2012) and/or for one of the extreme regions (Tokyo or countryside).

            Thanks for any info.
            The average salary now in Korea for an English teacher as in native speaker is 2 million, 300,000 won per month. That's around 210,000 yen per month depending on the exchange rate.

            It's bad for Aussies - I asked a friend of mine why they are teaching English in Korea for the dole in Oz after the won is converted into Oz dollars. It's actually less cause the Aussies on the dole (and refugees, migrants etc who never paid into the system) get phone, rental subsidies, transportation cheap etc.

            What country do you come from? Is it worth it in Korea for you after you exchange the pisspoor won into your own money?

            Transportation is cheaper in Korea, national health insurance too, taxis, some other things. Internet is fast and cheap, you usually get the rental fee for your accommodation covered by your employer but be aware the housing mostly sucks deep fried dog's balls.

            One rooms with a cupboard for a bathroom/toilet, no windows in the bathroom, no air vents in the room, shocking cultural norms like screaming all night if you want to as the norm from Koreans and throwing furniture around upstairs, and you won't be able to tell them to stop. Unlike in Japan there is no sense of maintaining the 'wa' or neighbourhood groups to enforce manners by shaming mofos who keep other people awake in the early hours when they are about to get up and go to work.

            If you are married you're likely to get a modest one bedroom apartment from your employer. But NEVER pay for the accommodation - it aint worth working in Korea paying for accommodation.

            Generally Koreans are collective in an oppressive sense and far more individualistic than Japanese in the worst, most selfish sense. If the sign telling them not to smoke in the public restrooms, or outside your door or in places where it's a firetrap doesn't have their name on it, they don't give a 100th of an ant's ____.

            Blocking ambulances is not an unusual sight and again, if the ambulance isn't calling out the driver of the obstructionist car's name on their loudspeaker, then the offending Korean feels free to not give a fark about the dying person transported to hospital.

            Old people really fukk off visitors to Korea. Just rudely stumbling into everyone's path, riding electric carts on the road while cars have to swerve to avoid them, rudely gesturing on their electronic carts and screaming at people waiting to get on the subway when the doors open because of course THEY are more important because they're old and they never dream of just being low-key.

            They stare and stare and stare in many places in Korea - and then they do it again. They jump the line frequently. Both the women and the men come across as real farks more often than not. Here 'old' includes the over 50s, Korean women in that age group hanging out together are often childishly oblivious of other people - again the line cutting and with arrogance. The men like to show their pole position in a number of ways.

            I've seen older/old men go up to young women including foreign women and try to muscle them away from their position waiting for the subway to arrive despite the fact the women were there first.

            A foreign woman I saw who was probably in her late 30s stood her ground silently and was abused verbally for it. The problem is not that most Koreans do this - it's that nearly all Koreans will accept this rudeness as normal and not call out the people who do it because of the slavery to heirarchies with men and older men at that at the top.

            My wife is Japanese born but of Korean ancestry and aware of her heritage. She and her family are great people. When she went to Korea she thought there was an incredibly selfish sense to a lot of the Koreans. She's right.

            Work can be a real lottery. Although hagwons (private language institutes) are not as bad as they once were, you get all sorts of bullshizz like split shifts for the salary I mentioned earlier. Those who say oh no, you can get 2.million, 600,000 won per month are lucky, very experienced, have connections.

            ALT type jobs in public schools are usually better but have gone down the drain. Reduced vacation, compulsory deskwarming during vacation, fukkery re when you can have your vacation and Korean resentment at foreigners going outside of Korea for vacation are usual. You have to deal with a whole chain of bullshizz Koreans in a public school - at least in a hagwon the chain of command is short.

            The demands have increased re documentation. More hoop jumping, apostilled this, apostilled that, no older than 6 months for criminal checks and apostilled copies of original degrees and now some employers are even demanding their waygugin teachers (gaijins in Korea) go again for the medical test that was supposed to be the once a year before you get your foreigner card.

            And recruiters control the flow of info re jobs. Direct hire is not usual. Recruiter fukkery is one of the reasons I am so glad I got out of Engrish teaching in Korea. Still interested?
            Last edited by caramellocap; 2012-06-20, 12:35 AM.

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