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26 too old for getting a job in Japan?

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  • 26 too old for getting a job in Japan?

    *First of all iLm from South America, my english is no so good but still practice please avoid that.*

    Hi

    Months ago i made a commentary about i will like travel for work and living in Japan as a graphic designer, sadly my study the career i did in institute and not in a university so i donLt have a bachellor degree, and that is the most important requirement for a visa work. My best option would validate in a university, continue my studies for 2 or 3 years and get the bachellor degree but in that days, looking some information in some pages about Japan i found something very interesting, the information about pay for each career.
    Realizing that a graphic designer salary is 200 000 yenes and have a low percent of job posting, i decided study another career. The good part of this is i still can validate my first career and i will have a special category of pension (no much difference between the institute and the university in terms of $$). The bad part as a new career i still worry and waiting for the answer about how much courses ared validated, will take me probably 4 years (take some courses in the summer). ILm very excited about this new career that i will study, think really will help me professionally here, in Japan or in whatever country, especially because even this days i have bad luck to find a job as graphic designer, people think i'm still young and i have not enough experience.

    The whole point is when all this is over (if move like i plan) i will have 26 o 27 years old and two professional careers but concerned me that age be considered "old" in terms for looking a job in Japan. With 24 would be more quiet, also i have planned have two years of experience work combining the two careers (1 year one and 1 year the another, something like that) and japanese lvl N4 (the next year begin learning japanese).

    So guys with all this, think iLm still have a chance to get a job in Japan?, with that age, the experience of work, the level N4 and in the three months of visa tourist?.

    At what age the japanese finish the university?

    PD: The new career is Marketing.

  • #2
    yeah im nearly 30 and ive just moved into a retirement home here. im now in the process o making a will and funeral arrangements

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    • #3
      Your age is not the problem.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by J_TK View Post
        *.....

        At what age the japanese finish the university?

        .......
        emotionally, at age 14.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by J_TK View Post
          The whole point is when all this is over (if move like i plan) i will have 26 o 27 years old and two professional careers but concerned me that age be considered "old" in terms for looking a job in Japan. With 24 would be more quiet, also i have planned have two years of experience work combining the two careers (1 year one and 1 year the another, something like that) and japanese lvl N4 (the next year begin learning japanese).

          So guys with all this, think iLm still have a chance to get a job in Japan?, with that age, the experience of work, the level N4 and in the three months of visa tourist?.

          PD: The new career is Marketing.
          Marketing means Sales ? I doubt that any company in Japan would hire a salesman who can only speak N4. Think about it the other way : Would a company in Brazil (or wherever you live) hire a Japanese who has your qualifications but only speaks basic Portugese ?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ttokyo View Post
            Marketing means Sales ? I doubt that any company in Japan would hire a salesman who can only speak N4. Think about it the other way : Would a company in Brazil (or wherever you live) hire a Japanese who has your qualifications but only speaks basic Portugese ?
            Well marketing has many fields (sales, promotion, advertising, market strategies, prices of products or services, communication and contact with clients, etc). This is why think this new career will help me a lot when i need find a job, correct me if iLm wrong but N4 is intermediate and lvl N5 advanced/native? or N4 is basic and N1 is advanced/native?.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by J_TK View Post
              Correct me if iLm wrong but N4 is intermediate and lvl N5 advanced/native? or N4 is basic and N1 is advanced/native?.
              So do you have a JLPT certificate or not ? What does it say ? N4 ? N5 ?

              Wikpedia says
              "N4 : The ability to understand basic Japanese. Reading One is able to read and understand passages on familiar daily topics written in basic vocabulary and kanji. Listening One is able to listen and comprehend conversations encountered in daily life and generally follow their contents, provided that they are spoken slowly."


              Originally posted by J_TK View Post
              Well marketing has many fields (sales, promotion, advertising, market strategies, prices of products or services, communication and contact with clients, etc). This is why think this new career will help me a lot when i need find a job.
              Still all of this would mean that you need to speak Japanese on a near-native level, i.e. much more than for an IT job...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by J_TK View Post
                correct me if iLm wrong but N4 is intermediate and lvl N5 advanced/native? or N4 is basic and N1 is advanced/native?.
                N5 = Tourist (Where is the toilet?)
                N4 = Beginner (I like ice cream.)
                N3 = Intermediate (I would like to open a bank account.)
                N2 = Upper Intermediate (I would be delighted if you could comply with my humble request to reply at your earliest convenience)
                N1 = Advanced (Nuclear power is the use of sustained exothermic nuclear processes to generate heat and electricity.)

                Also, this might hurt some people, but JLPT, especially after N2, has little to no real life value. It's a lot like TOEIC; getting a high score is cute, but it doesn't say a whole lot about your actual communication ability since it's all multiple-choice. Nevertheless, it can be a good goal to study for.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by sleepycat View Post
                  N1 = Advanced (Nuclear power is the use of sustained exothermic nuclear processes to generate heat and electricity.)
                  Nononono!
                  N1 = Get by in everyday conversation (mostly) without having your "opponent" switch to broken English immediately.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks all for the correction, yeah N5 is the most lower level and N1 the level top. This change a lot what i was planning, because i check again the offers jobs and see a lot of them (for no say the 100%) asks japanese lvl N1 or N2 (well most N1)...so my study of the japanese languaje will expand to 3 years, i was thinking ok if N4 is the basic requirement i have only study 1 year.
                    But now are three and even with that i donLt know if i be lvl N1 or N2 until take the JLPT and thats are two test per year, hahaha this has become very complicated basically because i need focus on college and work experience.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by yu_ominae View Post
                      Nononono!
                      N1 = Get by in everyday conversation (mostly) without having your "opponent" switch to broken English immediately.
                      Maybe I am just old and grumpy <disgruntled?>, but after 18 years here, almost nothing pisses me off more than this.
                      Fred

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by J_TK View Post
                        Thanks all for the correction, yeah N5 is the most lower level and N1 the level top. This change a lot what i was planning, because i check again the offers jobs and see a lot of them (for no say the 100%) asks japanese lvl N1 or N2 (well most N1)...so my study of the japanese languaje will expand to 3 years, i was thinking ok if N4 is the basic requirement i have only study 1 year.
                        You don't need 1 year to study for N4; it's doable in half that time. I forget if N4 was all of Minna no Nihongo I or Minna no Nihongo I + Minna no Nihongo II. I miss the language school days.

                        Also, the basic requirement is that you can speak the Japanese required for your job. No employer is going to ask what your JLPT level is and on international job boards the rating is usually (None/Conversational/Business/Fluent). I've met Chinese with N2 who are barely "conversational" and people with just N3 who could hold normal conversations about random topics with Japanese; skillfully working around any communication breakdowns.

                        Originally posted by shonanfred View Post
                        Maybe I am just old and grumpy <disgruntled?>, but after 18 years here, almost nothing pisses me off more than this.
                        I wonder how much that depends on the person. For some reason Tokyo is just like backwater Japan... people hear me utter one word in Japanese and don't bother with broken English. :s

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by shonanfred View Post
                          Maybe I am just old and grumpy <disgruntled?>, but after 18 years here, almost nothing pisses me off more than this.
                          Fred
                          Not just you man.
                          That and when I'm with my wife and I ask a question in Japanese to somebody and they reply, in Japanese, to my wife.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by yu_ominae View Post
                            Not just you man.
                            That and when I'm with my wife and I ask a question in Japanese to somebody and they reply, in Japanese, to my wife.
                            I just pretend I'm a mafia boss like Paulie in Goodfellas.
                            I don't want anyone hearing what I'm saying.
                            I speak to the wife and she speaks for me.
                            Any questions for me, ask her.

                            *I'm not Japanese, so I can't speak Japanese!!! That's the law here, right?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sleepycat View Post
                              Also, the basic requirement is that you can speak the Japanese required for your job. No employer is going to ask what your JLPT level is and on international job boards the rating is usually (None/Conversational/Business/Fluent). I've met Chinese with N2 who are barely "conversational" and people with just N3 who could hold normal conversations about random topics with Japanese; skillfully working around any communication breakdowns.
                              Confirm that. Although in my experience job board usually go None/Conversational/Business/NATIVE. It's a bid leap between business and native...
                              I recently was interviewed by a Chinese representative from a job agency. I scoped out their profile on LinkedIn beforehand. They had Japanese down as native. I put myself down as business so was quite expectant to see what a "native" foreigner could do. Big disappointment it was.

                              Basically, don't hesitate to list your speaking ability as high as you think you can get away with. It's the only way to grab job employers' attention.

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