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It's NABE time!

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  • It's NABE time!

    Especially popular in the cold winter months, nabe dishes include vegetable ingredients such as negi (Japanese leek) and hakusai (Chinese cabbage), various mushrooms, but also seafood and/or meat. There are many regional and personal varieties. Yummy!

    What's your favorite nabe and what restaurants can you recommened?




  • #2
    ƒIƒ‚ƒ[II

    Not to be confused with ¢ŠE‚̃iƒxƒAƒc.

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    • #3
      I've never been to eat nabe at a restaurant/ Part of the fun is curling up under a waem blanket at home, and just relaxing and chatting with the TV for background noise.

      Usually we use chicken (it's cheaper), but I love putting crab in. A new seafood shop has just opened up within 5 minutes of my apartment, and they have some taraba that looks more delicious everytime I walk past the shop...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Pkl View Post
        I've never been to eat nabe at a restaurant/ Part of the fun is curling up under a waem blanket at home, and just relaxing and chatting with the TV for background noise.

        Usually we use chicken (it's cheaper), but I love putting crab in. A new seafood shop has just opened up within 5 minutes of my apartment, and they have some taraba that looks more delicious everytime I walk past the shop...
        Taraba is a kind of crab right? How about chanko-nabe with lots of vegetables and not that much meat? Or the seafood chanko-nabe? Bit expensive but pretty tasty. I'm not that far from Ryogoku Station and there are some nice Sumo weight-gaining chanko nabe places there.

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        • #5
          Although recipieless,

          a bump for nabe-recipie-suggestions.

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          • #6
            Crab is good. Shabu-shabu is good. Kimchi nabe with pork shabu is also nice. My wife likes fugu nabe. It's best to eat a nabe at home and just put things that you feel like eating into it. You can get a package of whatever soup base you want at the local supermarket.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Marius_II View Post
              Although recipieless,

              a bump for nabe-recipie-suggestions.
              Yeah, basically a clean-out-your-fridge thing, right?

              Here's a nice one though:

              Chige-nabe ‚¿‚°“ç (kimchi)

              Stock ingredients:

              8 cups/1600 ml water
              4 cloves garlic
              1 Tbsp ginger juice
              3 Tbsp red miso (or regular miso)
              1 Tbsp toubanjan
              2 Tbsp kochujan
              1 Tbsp sesame oil
              2 Tbsp soy sauce
              200 ml/1 cup kimchi


              Nabe ingredients:

              200g thinly sliced pork
              1 block yaki-doufu (grilled tofu), or momen-tofu (firm tofu)
              Vegetables- choose two to four of: 1/2 - 1 pack mame-moyashi (soybean sprouts); 1/2 bunch shungiku (chrysanthemum leaves); 1 - 2 bunches chingensai (bok choy); 1/2 bunch spinach; 4- 8 shiitake; 1/4 head hakusai (Chinese cabbage); 1 bunch nira (Chinese chives); 1 small onion; 1 bell pepper; 1 stalk negi (long onion)
              Optional ingredients: 200 g cod or other white fish; 200 g squid; 200 g fresh oysters; 100 g ttok (Korean rice cake) or mochi (Japanese rice cake); 100 g dang myun or harusame (cellophane noodles); 100 g kuzukiri;
              To finish: 100 g udon (fat wheat noodles) or a few bowls full of cooked rice; 1 egg per person; thinly sliced negi


              Directions:

              Add all stock ingredients to the water, taking care to fully dissolve the miso, toubanjan and kochujan. Taste stock and add more seasonings if necessary, keeping in mind the the stock will become richer during cooking.

              Prepare the ingredients. If pork slices are large, cut in half. Cut tofu into 6 to 8 cubes. Cut vegetables, fish and squid into large bite-sized pieces. Soak cellophane noodles in hot (not boiling) water for five minutes, drain, rinse with cold water and drain again; cut into shorter lengths if desired. If udon noodles are not pre-cooked, boil briefly until barely soft. Arrange all ingredients on platters at the table, along with a ladle and saibashi (long cooking chopsticks) or tongs for handling the raw meat and seafood. Set a small bowl and chopsticks at each place setting.

              Fill a donabe (earthenware pot) or other pot with half of the stock, reserving the remaining. Bring the stock to a simmer on the stove top, then carry to the table and place on a konro (portable gas grill). With heat on medium-high, start adding ingredients. Add ingredients that need a lot of time to cook, like tofu and mochi, first; then diners can add a little of whatever they like, taking care not to crowd the pot. Ladle a little bit of the stock into each bowl and pluck items from the pot as they finish cooking. Continue to replace ingredients in nabe, being careful to handle raw meat or seafood with the saibashi or tongs. When the stock gets low, carefully pour in some of the reserved stock.

              After all ingredients are used up, the stock will be richly flavoured. Finish the meal by cooking either rice or udon noodles in the stock. For zousui (also called ojiya), see tomorrow's recipe. For udon, heat the pre-cooked noodles in the stock until warm, add the eggs, mix lightly and cover. Turn off the heat and let it sit a few minutes, until the are barely eggs set. Serve topped with the negi.

              Serves 2- 4 people.

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              • #8
                My wife looked at that first picture



                and said, "怪しい."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hijinx View Post
                  My wife looked at that first picture
                  and said, "‰ö‚µ‚¢."
                  as in 'where's the burner to keep it hot'-ayashii, or 'oh my God, what did they put in there!'-ayashii?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ‚Ђ³‚µ‚Ô‚è View Post
                    as in 'where's the burner to keep it hot'-ayashii, or 'oh my God, what did they put in there!'-ayashii?
                    As in, "Something doesn't look right with the ingredients." But who cares? Japanese have presentation issues.

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                    • #11
                      Noticed the wasabi clip, condom on the left (in the nabe), and the overturned glass. This is a disaster nabe home party. Where's Wally?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ‚Ђ³‚µ‚Ô‚è View Post
                        Noticed the wasabi clip, condom on the left (in the nabe), and the overturned glass. This is a disaster nabe home party. Where's Wally?
                        Waldo?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hijinx View Post
                          Waldo?
                          LOL thanks! (was that subway-manner thread pulled?)

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ‚Ђ³‚µ‚Ô‚è View Post
                            LOL thanks! (was that subway-manner thread pulled?)
                            Seems it survived:

                            http://www.gaijinpot.com/bb/showthread.php?t=64152

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                            • #15
                              from the sumo forum...

                              Originally posted by ‚Ђ³‚µ‚Ô‚è View Post
                              I'm not that far from Ryogoku Station and there are some nice Sumo weight-gaining chanko nabe places there.
                              Is this Momonja good?

                              Shall have g—t“ç tomorrow

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