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ƒGƒC OR ƒG[ for a name that's only one letter - A

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  • ƒGƒC OR ƒG[ for a name that's only one letter - A

    Hi folks,

    Just a simple, hypothetical question. If a person has the full name in his passport & birth certificate as Martin A Newman (example only for the purpose of this thread). How would you or Japanese native write the "A" bit in Katakana?

    ƒGƒC OR ƒG[ ??? This one has got me stumped...

    Do you write it as how you would pronounce it in english? - ƒGƒC as in A, B, C, D... or would you write it as how the Japanese would say it? - ƒG[ which literally is "e" adding the "[" for emphasis which sounds like a weak "A" to foreign ears.

    Also to make it more complex (lol), that person has lived in Japan before and found his old Japanese bank card with the katakana for "A" as ƒGƒC and now, the wifey translated the marriage certificate and citizenship certificate with the "A" as ƒG[ would this cause trouble for that person later on in the future? Considering that the past is the past and he can't remember if they used ƒGƒC OR ƒG[ on more than one occasion for other application forms like the bank.

    Could the past connect with the present and affect the future in this situation? lol

    Ahhh! this is confusing sorry, any thoughts anyone?

    Thanks -_-;

  • #2
    Originally posted by rjstylz View Post
    hi folks,

    just a simple, hypothetical question. If a person has the full name in his passport & birth certificate as martin a newman (example only for the purpose of this thread). How would you or japanese native write the "a" bit in katakana?

    ƒGƒC or ƒG[ ??? This one has got me stumped...

    Do you write it as how you would pronounce it in english? - ƒGƒC as in a, b, c, d... Or would you write it as how the japanese would say it? - ƒG[ which literally is "e" adding the "[" for emphasis which sounds like a weak "a" to foreign ears.

    Also to make it more complex (lol), that person has lived in japan before and found his old japanese bank card with the katakana for "a" as ƒGƒC and now, the wifey translated the marriage certificate and citizenship certificate with the "a" as ƒG[ would this cause trouble for that person later on in the future? Considering that the past is the past and he can't remember if they used ƒGƒC or ƒG[ on more than one occasion for other application forms like the bank.

    Could the past connect with the present and affect the future in this situation? Lol

    ahhh! This is confusing sorry, any thoughts anyone?

    Thanks -_-;
    Write it as A.

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't be a nerd. Go with Aaaay.

      Last edited by Shimi; 2013-09-11, 02:36 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by iago View Post
        Write it as A.
        which A? ƒGƒC or ƒG[?

        LOL @ Shimi, respect to da Fonz ayyyy lol

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by RJSTYLZ View Post
          which A? ƒGƒC or ƒG[?
          The letter "A". As in AKB48.

          Comment


          • #6
            well actually Iago gave a good hint.

            If the pronunciation is as the A in AKB

            then go with what THEY use on their wikipedia:

            ƒG[ƒP[ƒr[

            so ƒG[

            Comment


            • #7
              Another hint...

              https://groups.google.com/forum/#!to...ku/emfT_anZGpU

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by iago View Post
                The letter "A". As in AKB48.
                What about the letter letter "A" as in ƒAƒCƒGƒCƒS[?

                @OP

                I don't think it makes much of a difference either way as long as you are consistent. You should be able just to use the middle initial as is, e.g., ƒ}[ƒeƒBƒ“ A. ƒjƒ…[ƒ}ƒ“.

                Comment


                • #9
                  "A" as in Ayrab?

                  Comment

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