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  • #16
    Why not just pump directly from the fish-tank (aka mega-bukkit) to the plant grow-bed?
    I think you'd want to maximize oxygenation of the water in some way as it returns to the fish-tank. One thought that occured to me was that by raising the grow-bed somewhat, you'd get better oxygenation as the water flowed back into the fish-tank - basically a mini-waterfall so the greater drop the better (within reason - you don't want it just splashing all over the place). Or you could get fancy with flow-forms and stuff...

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    • #17
      Looks fun Antweazle!

      3 ways to oxygenate, a)maximize edge between air & water b)more plants c)bubbler

      A high waterfall adds edge. Many small waterfalls add more edge than 1 big one. (a number of small holes in the bottom of the grow bed?)

      Vertically stack a couple of shallower grow beds and one deeper one. Perhaps a shelf structure with a chicken wire back/sides so peas, tomatoes, malabar spinach or other vines can get vertical? Chicken wire can also be used to maximize surface area of the water, http://sites.google.com/site/glennea...evaporator.jpgbut i'd be worried about metals building up in the fish.

      If you go with the overflow bucket idea, that creates more surface area where the water meets the air, so this is good, assuming you have the space. If it's possible to add duck weed or algae to the overflow bucket you maximize use of that space/water... just have to find a way to keep the pump clean. Algae and duck weed feed & oxygenate the fish. If you can create a waterfall from the main bucket to the overflow, then you add more 02.

      As for the grow bed, I wonder if ebb & flow systems increase oxygenation? If the growing medium has lots of little holes in it (porous rock) if the bed is drained then refilled, it would seem a whole lot of air would get trapped in pockets, increasing oxygenation prior to falling back into the main tank?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Gandalf View Post
        Why not just pump directly from the fish-tank (aka mega-bukkit) to the plant grow-bed?
        I'm sort of guessing from memory, but what I recall reading is that a drain tank can provide oxygen by acting as a reservoir into which the overflow from main tank cascades and it is also stocked with oxygenating plants. The drain tank can be rigged with a filter to avoid clogging (why this is better than a filter intake in the main tank I'm yet to determine).
        Originally posted by Gandalf View Post
        I think you'd want to maximize oxygenation of the water in some way as it returns to the fish-tank. One thought that occured to me was that by raising the grow-bed somewhat, you'd get better oxygenation as the water flowed back into the fish-tank - basically a mini-waterfall so the greater drop the better (within reason - you don't want it just splashing all over the place). Or you could get fancy with flow-forms and stuff...
        Yes, more height for oxygenation sounds like a good idea.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Yukkuri Kame View Post
          Looks fun Antweazle!

          3 ways to oxygenate, a)maximize edge between air & water b)more plants c)bubbler

          A high waterfall adds edge. Many small waterfalls add more edge than 1 big one. (a number of small holes in the bottom of the grow bed?)

          Vertically stack a couple of shallower grow beds and one deeper one. Perhaps a shelf structure with a chicken wire back/sides so peas, tomatoes, malabar spinach or other vines can get vertical? Chicken wire can also be used to maximize surface area of the water, http://sites.google.com/site/glennea...evaporator.jpgbut i'd be worried about metals building up in the fish.

          If you go with the overflow bucket idea, that creates more surface area where the water meets the air, so this is good, assuming you have the space. If it's possible to add duck weed or algae to the overflow bucket you maximize use of that space/water... just have to find a way to keep the pump clean. Algae and duck weed feed & oxygenate the fish. If you can create a waterfall from the main bucket to the overflow, then you add more 02.

          As for the grow bed, I wonder if ebb & flow systems increase oxygenation? If the growing medium has lots of little holes in it (porous rock) if the bed is drained then refilled, it would seem a whole lot of air would get trapped in pockets, increasing oxygenation prior to falling back into the main tank?
          Acronym time (AT).
          We need to calculate/guesstimate the rate of water/nutrient (WN) flow from the main tank (MT) to the grow bed (GB). With the continuous cycle idea, the WN has to stay long enough within the grow medium (BTW I'm thinking a 50/50 mix of vermiculite and perlite- both available locally) for the plants to extract their tucker and clean the WN solution for return to the fishys. This may be the trial and error research stage (but without the fishys), using an organic nutrient additive.
          WN flow from the MT is distributed along the length of the GB via a length of 16mm PVC pipe with a series of holes drilled innit. The GB reclines on a 'slight' angle to ensure all WN drains from the GB to the MT via a hole in one end of the GB. As you suggested, there are also a number of small holes in the base of the GB for the WN to drain to the MT.
          Ebb and flow (E&F) would require the use of a timer. No biggie to trial with a secondary GB. The E&F GB has an overflow drain and/or ball____ mechanism.
          ** Time for explanatory pictures, methinks.**
          The chickwire pic you attached looks very interesting. Could devise a smaller version to suit the single MT scale.
          Time to do some pump research (PR). A nice little solar job would be best. Whatever the unit used, the rate of flow must be able to be varied.

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          • #20








            'nuf said.

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            • #21
              Looking good A.W.

              I'm thinking the garden pool site has been posted before in another thread. Interesting site, though I am a little skeptical of some of their claims. Finally figured out when they say self-sufficiency, I think they mean that the system is more or less a closed loop, not that they are feeding themselves? Have yet to see them produce a full sized fish, but lots of little ones. Considering Mollison's grandiose claims about permaculture, I guess I can forgive gardenpool. Lack of specifics about yields is a pet peeve of mine. Wish more folks did like the Dervaes family and actually put their produce on a scale, then we'd have some more reliable information to go by.
              http://gardenpool.org/

              Longer intro to aquaponics:

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              • #22
                I did a quick search for a site explaining aquaponics and how to do them.

                "aquaponics how to" search led me, appropriately, to: http://www.aquaponicshowto.com/

                Interesting site.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Plants For A Future: plant list for pond or bog

                  The Edible Pond and Bog Garden

                  The following list contains many plants, most of them either natives of Britain or naturalized here, that can be grown in ponds or boggy ground. They are all perennials and, unless stated otherwise, can be easily propagated by seed or by division in spring or autumn. Since we have only recently put in a pond and set up a bog garden we have little practical knowledge of many of the plants included here. The list is made up of some of the plants we intend to grow and, we hope you will agree, they show that there is a tremendous potential for food production from ponds and boggy areas.
                  http://www.pfaf.org/user/cmspage.aspx?pageid=79

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                  • #24
                    interesting tidbit

                    http://www.permacultureglobal.com/posts/181

                    Aeration is a whole chapter we could talk about in detail. Most people think it’s the little bubbles that you see in an aquarium that are dissolving into the water and adding oxygen into the fish tank. I was assured recently that this is not true and a common myth by a biologist. Dr Wilson Lennard an expert on Aquaponics who says that it’s the breaking of the surface tension at the surface of the water body that the bubbles release Co2 into the atmosphere as it takes in O2 in it’s place. Most people find this hard to believe. Wind and waves in a large body of water do the same thing. A paddle wheel disturbing the surface of your fish tank will aerate your tank. Rain falling into your tank will add some oxygen as well. Break the surface tension and you are in business with raising fish! Never forget that rule.

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                    • #25
                      FREE Intro to Aquaponics Webinar with Max Meyers

                      Looks like basically an advertisement for the intensive, but maybe some interesting content. US pacific time...so it will be this Sat.AM japan time.

                      all the best,
                      YK

                      https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/175298494
                      FREE Intro to Aquaponics Webinar with Max Meyers
                      Friday, April 29, 2011 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM PDT
                      - Show in my Time Zone
                      Webinar Registration
                      Join Max Meyers in this Introductory Webinar on Commercial Aquaponics

                      Aquaponics is one of the most sustainable and productive farming systems in the world. It combines Aquaculture and Hydroponics to create a truly self-sufficient closed loop system that uses only a fraction of the water, labor, energy, etc. that other methods use, while producing up to 10 times as much food!!

                      This hour-long intro will provide a sneak peak into the Upcoming 5-day Commercial Aquaponics Training with Applied Permaculture Design Max is leading in Ukiah, CA May 16-20.

                      The webinar will introduce foundational concepts that will be expanded upon at the training such as:
                      + System design and construction
                      + Business models
                      + Case studies
                      + Guidelines and more!

                      Max Meyers brings over a decade of practicing and teaching Permaculture into his teachings on Aquaponics. This approach ensures that truly sustainable closed loop systems are created, as the design embeds each of the system’s needs (water, energy, fish, feed, heat, gas, etc.) to be generated on site.

                      Products of a permaculture designed aquaponics systems can include: solar electricity, solar heated air, solar heated water, fish, prawns, vegetables, fruit, aquatic plants, algae, minnows, snails, worms, dry and liquid fertilizers, even methane gas!

                      Join Max and others interested in this powerful farming method for this FREE webinar, and visit the following link to read more about this amazing approach to food generation, green business and sustainable design: http://www.livingmandala.com/Living_...FRpVgwodcUHJBw to

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                      • #26
                        Hi Yukkuri and Antweazle, thanks for the great sharing on Aquaculture & Aquaponics. Some information here is interesting and in detail. Really helpful for how to aquaponics and solving problem while DIY an aquaponics system. More basic about aquaponics here at http://www.squidoo.com/aquaponics-4-...growing-system

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by wmanoble View Post
                          Hi Yukkuri and Antweazle, thanks for the great sharing on Aquaculture & Aquaponics. Some information here is interesting and in detail. Really helpful for how to aquaponics and solving problem while DIY an aquaponics system. More basic about aquaponics here at http://www.squidoo.com/aquaponics-fo...growing-system
                          Hey wmanoble, please post a directl link to download your "Aquaponics 4 You" PDF file. That would be a helpful and welcome contribution.

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                          • #28
                            PS. wmanoble: those messages that pop up when someone tries to leave your website are as annoying as hell. Plz knockitoff.

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