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Getting a new shaken-sho after old one expires

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  • Getting a new shaken-sho after old one expires

    My shaken-sho is about to expire shortly, but I don't think I'll get a chance to go in for a new one before then. Does anybody know if it complicates the process if you go for a new shaken a couple of weeks after the old one expires?

    I should mention too that I'm a cheapskate and don't want to pay a third party to do it.

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    A man after my own heart I see.

    I would have thought it would complicate matters. How are you going to get the car to the testing station if it is not legal to drive it on the road?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jrp View Post
      My shaken-sho is about to expire shortly, but I don't think I'll get a chance to go in for a new one before then. Does anybody know if it complicates the process if you go for a new shaken a couple of weeks after the old one expires?

      I should mention too that I'm a cheapskate and don't want to pay a third party to do it.

      Thanks in advance.
      Yes it does. (see below) But you essentially pay the same charges (weight tax, vehicle tax, inspection fee, registration fee) You also have to get mandatory insurance, but it's the same in any case.

      Originally posted by Brown Cow View Post
      How are you going to get the car to the testing station if it is not legal to drive it on the road?
      You can get temporary license plates (red diagonal line across plate) form your ward or city office. I'm not sure if it's for a couple days or a week. You pay for insurance there as well.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Brown Cow View Post
        A man after my own heart I see.

        I would have thought it would complicate matters. How are you going to get the car to the testing station if it is not legal to drive it on the road?
        Yes, that thought is running through my head. Although it's not too far from my place to the testing station - I was thinking of driving very very very carefully

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hml View Post
          Yes it does. (see below) But you essentially pay the same charges (weight tax, vehicle tax, inspection fee, registration fee) You also have to get mandatory insurance, but it's the same in any case.

          You can get temporary license plates (red diagonal line across plate) form your ward or city office. I'm not sure if it's for a couple days or a week. You pay for insurance there as well.
          Cheers for the answer. Just to clarify it - everything is basically the same as if the old shaken-sho hadn't expired - the only real difference is getting to the shaken-sho inspection centre from a legal perspective?
          But even that may be okay with the temporary plates you mention.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jrp View Post
            Cheers for the answer. Just to clarify it - everything is basically the same as if the old shaken-sho hadn't expired - the only real difference is getting to the shaken-sho inspection centre from a legal perspective?
            But even that may be okay with the temporary plates you mention.
            I've been out of the business for awhile, so there *may* be some additional charge. It seems like there was something more to registering a car without "shaken" vs continuing the registration on a car with "shaken" "left".

            Don't misunderstand about the temporary plates. You do not want to be driving around with those. You want to go to the DMV and get your car registered.

            I believe you will have to pay taxes for the time your car was without "shaken" as it was still registered and therefore liable for taxes. I know for certain you have to pay the 自動車税, or the yearly tax. You pay that until the car is de-registered (when you pull the plates off and turn them in).

            And it's "centER".

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jrp View Post
              My shaken-sho is about to expire shortly, but I don't think I'll get a chance to go in for a new one before then. Does anybody know if it complicates the process if you go for a new shaken a couple of weeks after the old one expires?

              I should mention too that I'm a cheapskate and don't want to pay a third party to do it.

              Thanks in advance.
              Most tight with the money am I as well, but are there not any gas stands around that will do it? Considering all the trouble of getting the inspection done after the expiration, a little extra money may be worth it. Many of the places that don't have a large repair center will do everything for a small fee. Used to take my car (which could qualify as an antique, but in good condition) to a dealer. Always ran about 180,000 yen because of the car's age and they wanted to make the car as "close to new" as possible. Last time took my horseless carriage to a gas stand. Told the place that I just wanted the fluids changed and the car to pass the inspection. (The standards are not overly strict.) Two days, one night later the shaken was done, and for 80,000yen.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mr. Ludd View Post
                Most tight with the money am I as well, but are there not any gas stands around that will do it? Considering all the trouble of getting the inspection done after the expiration, a little extra money may be worth it. Many of the places that don't have a large repair center will do everything for a small fee. Used to take my car (which could qualify as an antique, but in good condition) to a dealer. Always ran about 180,000 yen because of the car's age and they wanted to make the car as "close to new" as possible. Last time took my horseless carriage to a gas stand. Told the place that I just wanted the fluids changed and the car to pass the inspection. (The standards are not overly strict.) Two days, one night later the shaken was done, and for 80,000yen.
                I have to say although my heart is very much in the DIY and understand everything properly/a penny saved is 1.3 (after tax) pennies earned camp, I go to a chain to have our ageing but still less than 70k kilometre cars done. After a good shop around we worked out that assuming no work needs doing we would only save about 5,000 per car doing it ourselves over using the cheapest place. Factor in the risk of a fail and retest going the DIY route and it didn't seem worth it. The place I go to has its own licensed testing facility, so I make an appointment, turn up, and if all goes well I am out again within half an hour or so with a new shaken.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yep, it's looking like it will be easier to get a shop to do it.

                  I've got one of those people mover thingees, so it's in the 1,501-2,000 kg bracket (2.7L engine). I needed to get a battery for it today and checked out the prices for them to do the shaken as well.
                  Yellow Hat is 98,740.
                  Autobac is 95,850

                  Although Mr Ludd, your 80,000 sounds even better (I guess that depends on the size of your care though).

                  Autobac offered a free 12 month safety check when they changed the battery (well worth the 500 yen it cost for them to do it since they took the old battery).

                  One interesting thing I learnt too. If you get the shaken up to one month before the present one expires, they postdate the new shaken to the date the old one expires. If you do it one month and one day earlier, then the shaken starts the day it passed.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We tend to use HiyaTaro now as they were a reasonable bit cheaper than Apple, have a very nice, well equipped workshop with a public gallery view and always seem to give out a voucher for money off the next oil change with them.

                    Haven't tried Autobacs or Yellow Hat. HiyaTaro's sales tactics are a lot less comprehensive than Apple though. Apart from a tremendous enthusiasm for cleaning the brakes/hubs they aren't too bad. They have a machine that analyses the brake fluid boiling temperature which I can see is a good idea. One car was fine but the other was a bit low. Seeing as how it was at that time about 9 years old and I knew the fluid had never been changed, I found that credible and worth changing. I'd rather not have the stuff even close to boiling on a summer run down a mountainside that's for sure. I have to admit that my brake shoes and hubs remain shamefully grubby.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I find this service to be intriguing, although not sure if I can use it due to my limited language skills. http://selfshaken.com/
                      Nominally, it will only cost an extra 4000 yen. There is also an excellent thread on this site about doing shaken yourself.

                      One thing I am curious about is why the previous owner of my car obtained an extra month for the compulsory insurance. What's the point if you can't drive the car beyond the date? Does it mean that you are breaking the law by driving the car but in case you do then at least you have insurance if something happens?


                      Originally posted by Brown Cow View Post
                      We tend to use HiyaTaro now as they were a reasonable bit cheaper than Apple, have a very nice, well equipped workshop with a public gallery view and always seem to give out a voucher for money off the next oil change with them.

                      Haven't tried Autobacs or Yellow Hat. HiyaTaro's sales tactics are a lot less comprehensive than Apple though. Apart from a tremendous enthusiasm for cleaning the brakes/hubs they aren't too bad. They have a machine that analyses the brake fluid boiling temperature which I can see is a good idea. One car was fine but the other was a bit low. Seeing as how it was at that time about 9 years old and I knew the fluid had never been changed, I found that credible and worth changing. I'd rather not have the stuff even close to boiling on a summer run down a mountainside that's for sure. I have to admit that my brake shoes and hubs remain shamefully grubby.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by flrgaijinpot View Post
                        One thing I am curious about is why the previous owner of my car obtained an extra month for the compulsory insurance. What's the point if you can't drive the car beyond the date? Does it mean that you are breaking the law by driving the car but in case you do then at least you have insurance if something happens?
                        Insurance on a car driven illegally will not be valid. insurance + no license = no insurance. insurance + car registration outdated = no insurance. Drive carefully!

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                        • #13
                          I drive 500 meters to my local Shell station. Get it there before 9:00 am and pick it up at 5:00 pm. Did it last week--78,000 yen [2010 Corolla].

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by hml View Post
                            Insurance on a car driven illegally will not be valid. insurance + no license = no insurance. insurance + car registration outdated = no insurance. Drive carefully!
                            So, what's the point of buying 25 months of compulsory liability insurance when it will not apply, according to your information. It seems to be a standard option when renewing the compulsory insurance.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by flrgaijinpot View Post
                              So, what's the point of buying 25 months of compulsory liability insurance when it will not apply, according to your information. It seems to be a standard option when renewing the compulsory insurance.
                              Good question. What does the fine print of your policy say?

                              Maybe it says that the insurance only is applicable as long as the vehicle can be legally operated in Japan. Don't most insurance companies put language in their policies that make said policy void under certain conditions? Maybe this is one of those cases?

                              Sorry could only find these but they seem to answer what you're asking. They're from Chiebukuro so no guarantees as to how accurate they are.

                              http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp...il/q1012888495
                              http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp...il/q1167030641

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