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Sakura Viewing at Shinjuku Gyoen Park

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  • Sakura Viewing at Shinjuku Gyoen Park



    One of the sure signs of spring in Japan is the blossoming of the cherry blossoms. Every spring millions of people across the country turn out to celebrate the fleeting beauty of the sakura.

    Shinjuku Gyoen is one of the largest and most popular parks in Tokyo and known not only for its spacious lawns and tranquil scenery, but for its beautiful sakura blossoms in spring. Shinjuku Gyoen originated during the Edo Period (1603-1867) as a feudal lordfs Tokyo residence and was later on transferred to the Imperial family, who used it for recreation and entertainment. It was almost completely destroyed during the second World War, but was rebuilt and reopened in 1949 as a public park.

    The park has three different types of gardens: the traditional Japanese landscape garden, which consists of large ponds with islands and bridges and the French garden and the English landscape garden which feature wide, open lawns surrounded by flowering cherry trees. There is a good amount of benches and tables in the park to enjoy a picnic. The rest of the park has forested areas, as well as a greenhouse with a variety of tropical and subtropical flowers.

    Shinjuku Gyoen is also a popular destination during autumn, because of the different types of trees that change colors in autumn. There are more than a dozen different varieties of cherry trees, and more than 400 somei yoshino trees around the English garden, making the area as a popular hanami spot.

    If youfre planning to visit, the park has three gates: Shinjuku Gate, Okido Gate and the Sendagaya Gate. Shinjuku Gate is a ten minute walk from the new south exit of JR Shinjuku Station and a five minute walk from Shinjukugyoenmae Station on the Marunouchi Subway Line. Okido is five minutes away from Shinjukugyoenmae Station on the Marunouchi Subway Line while Sendagaya Gate is also five minutes away from HR Sendagay Station on the local Chuo/Sobu Line. The park is open from 9AM to 4:30PM and is closed on Mondays except during the cherry blossom season.

  • #2
    Originally posted by GaijinPot View Post


    One of the sure signs of spring in Japan is the blossoming of the cherry blossoms. Every spring millions of people across the country turn out to celebrate the fleeting beauty of the sakura.

    Shinjuku Gyoen is one of the largest and most popular parks in Tokyo and known not only for its spacious lawns and tranquil scenery, but for its beautiful sakura blossoms in spring. Shinjuku Gyoen originated during the Edo Period (1603-1867) as a feudal lordfs Tokyo residence and was later on transferred to the Imperial family, who used it for recreation and entertainment. It was almost completely destroyed during the second World War, but was rebuilt and reopened in 1949 as a public park.

    The park has three different types of gardens: the traditional Japanese landscape garden, which consists of large ponds with islands and bridges and the French garden and the English landscape garden which feature wide, open lawns surrounded by flowering cherry trees. There is a good amount of benches and tables in the park to enjoy a picnic. The rest of the park has forested areas, as well as a greenhouse with a variety of tropical and subtropical flowers.

    Shinjuku Gyoen is also a popular destination during autumn, because of the different types of trees that change colors in autumn. There are more than a dozen different varieties of cherry trees, and more than 400 somei yoshino trees around the English garden, making the area as a popular hanami spot.

    If youfre planning to visit, the park has three gates: Shinjuku Gate, Okido Gate and the Sendagaya Gate. Shinjuku Gate is a ten minute walk from the new south exit of JR Shinjuku Station and a five minute walk from Shinjukugyoenmae Station on the Marunouchi Subway Line. Okido is five minutes away from Shinjukugyoenmae Station on the Marunouchi Subway Line while Sendagaya Gate is also five minutes away from HR Sendagay Station on the local Chuo/Sobu Line. The park is open from 9AM to 4:30PM and is closed on Mondays except during the cherry blossom season.
    Best of all you still have 10 months to prepare for next years hanami! Plenty of time to figure out how to cook all those delicious Japanese side dishes for a traditional Japanese afternoon of lunch followed by endless sake.

    Seriously though, outside of Sakura season, I prefer the Hama Rikyu garden down on Tokyo bay. Very nice garden and usually much less crowded than the Shinjuku area. Nice oasis of calm in the city.
    Last edited by kabunushi; 2013-06-23, 01:26 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by kabunushi View Post
      Best of all you still have 10 months to prepare for next years hanami! Plenty of time to figure out how to cook all those delicious Japanese side dishes for a traditional Japanese afternoon of lunch followed by endless sake.

      .
      No sake at Shinjuku Gyoen though. (Or any other type of booze) They search you at the gates come hanami time and there are oji's patrolling to enforce the rule. So you have to be a bit crafty. But it does make a nice change from the craziness, toilet lines and urine/garbage stench at Yoyogi that time of year.

      This IS an odd time of year for this post (right after the very last blossoms have well and done fallen in the farthest North) Still, Kimonos cherry blossom, loose socks and crowded trains. It intermingles in the mind.
      God help any tourists that show up from now 'til October... A constant wet warmth, a snowless Fuji and insects screaming like airplanes going down.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by kabunushi View Post
        Hama Rikyu garden down on Tokyo bay
        Fully agree...

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        • #5
          Yanaka cemetery (5 min walk from Nippori station) is also very good and a slightly off-kilter choice.
          Good for the Japanese for partying in a cemetery!

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