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Basic Question about Nenkin

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  • Basic Question about Nenkin

    I should really know this answer to my question since I've lived in Japan for a hundred years, but do foreigners have to pay the nenkin even in the first year of working here?

    I didn't pay for the first 9 months because I was doing the Eikaiwa thing back then. Anyway, you have to pay for 25 years before you can get a full pension and I've only got another 15 years to go to be qualified for a full pension when my time comes.

  • #2
    I was signed up for the national health insurance

    when I arrived in Japan in the late 1990s.

    I went to the ward office with my employer and the people there kindly asked me if I wanted to join the pension system as well. It would have been the 'self employed/part timers' nenkin in conjunction with the National Health Insurance which I paid for all by myself despite some hefty working hours beyond the usual full time load in eikaiw.

    Luckily my employer may have been somewhat exploitative but he was quick to tell me that the pension in Japan was VERY different from the scheme/s in my home country. He said it was not worth it unless I planned on sticking around for less than 3 years and even then it wasn't great as you would outlay more money than you would get back.

    He did me a huge favour. We said no thanks about the pension part so I just went on the health insurance through the ward office. The ward office people were nice and never throughout my following years which were longer than 3, asked me to join the pension. I left Japan relatively recently and never paid the pension even though I moved a couple of times.

    However, yes it is now standard for every foreigner - supposedly. From your first year they will usually make you sign up for it along with the NHI in the Kokuminkenkohoken. It has actually been policy for a while but people like myself were lucky to be exempt, probably because I signed up for the NHI in the late 90s and kept paying my premiums.

    I have a theory that if you're delinquent with ward tax and NHI payments your ward office is more likely to get pissed off and find ways to screw you - like enforcing the pension sign up.

    Many ward offices started to make official in their info for foreigners in about 2003 or so that the pension is mandatory along with the NHI on Kokuminkenkohoken - social insurance for the supposedly self-employed and part-timers tho it also covers full time eikaiwa employees whose miserable bosses won't help them with the payments.

    My boss was a miserable _______ but he saved me a fortune in non pension payments. My inaka ward offices were kind and never bailed me up to join the pension part. Others are not so lucky.

    Comment


    • #3
      Better late then never

      Unfortunately, if you join a Japanese payroll, yes you are subject to the Nenkinhoken. No way around it. Unless... you are fortunate enough to come from a country with which Japan has a tax treaty AND you have been paying in your country's pension system for all the time that you've been here. If you get a certificate proving this you can get exempt from the Nenkin Hoken. Downside: there are only six countries that have such a treaty with Japan. Byheart (but please make sure yourself) UK, US, Belgium, France, Germany and one other.

      The reason the teachers working for Nova and other scum do not pay is because they are actually not employees but so called contract workers, and therefore most of the time not on an offical payroll. Beside they are supposed to leave after a couple of years, so useless to enroll and go through the admnistrative hassle to get a refund anyway.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by menneke
        Unfortunately, if you join a Japanese payroll, yes you are subject to the Nenkinhoken. No way around it. Unless... you are fortunate enough to come from a country with which Japan has a tax treaty AND you have been paying in your country's pension system for all the time that you've been here. If you get a certificate proving this you can get exempt from the Nenkin Hoken. Downside: there are only six countries that have such a treaty with Japan. Byheart (but please make sure yourself) UK, US, Belgium, France, Germany and one other.

        The reason the teachers working for Nova and other scum do not pay is because they are actually not employees but so called contract workers, and therefore most of the time not on an offical payroll. Beside they are supposed to leave after a couple of years, so useless to enroll and go through the admnistrative hassle to get a refund anyway.

        I have no problem with paying nenkin, in fact I've been paying it for the past 10 years. However, in my first 9 months I did not.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Since1990
          I have no problem with paying nenkin, in fact I've been paying it for the past 10 years. However, in my first 9 months I did not.
          Hi!
          I've been paying like 20k yen for 15 months. Now that I plan to go back home, how much of it may I receive? Is easy to apply?
          Thanks in advance!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by che-che-che!
            Hi!
            I've been paying like 20k yen for 15 months. Now that I plan to go back home, how much of it may I receive? Is easy to apply?
            Thanks in advance!
            I think you can get back about half of it. Easy to apply? Have you ever seen an easy form in Japan? I mean one on which you didn't haved to complete the same questions 3 times (phrased differently though) to make sure that you were sure of your first answer being correct?

            Any way, no it ain't easy, and.... you can only apply AFTER you left the country.

            Ganbatte!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by che-che-che!
              Hi!
              I've been paying like 20k yen for 15 months. Now that I plan to go back home, how much of it may I receive? Is easy to apply?
              Thanks in advance!

              Refunds are pro-rated depending on how long you have paid in. If you are here one year you get back about the equivalent of two weeks salary.
              Someone here for 36 months gets about 2.4 months salary refunded

              The govt will also take out 20% in a tax as its no longer a pension but income, and you can claim a refund of this once you leave the country for good.

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              • #8
                Just go to the whatever office and state the fact that you have been paying whatever for whatever amount of years and ya should be ok or eligible to join the class action that no doubt will happen as no one seems to know who paid what or not...

                And indeed why not... whatcha gotta to lose after all they cannot prove that you did not akin to ya not being able to prove that ya did...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks a lot, guys.
                  Now I have an idea if it worths getting refund and go through the long process.I wasn't sure either getting refunds or keep it and add it up to my home country pension which Japan has mutual agreements.

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