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Admittance requirements for G30 Universities?

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  • Admittance requirements for G30 Universities?

    I am thinking of going to a G30 university such as Kyushu, Tsukuba, Nagoya etc, but I'm wondering what the requirements are to be accepted. I know you have to be foreign and have to complete 12 years of school (high school, which I did graduate). I'm 23 and my grades in high school were not great, so I'm wondering if anyone has an idea of what the requirements are and chances to get in, and what the chances are to get scholarships if I were to get very high marks the first year.
    Last edited by GinkgoL3af; 2013-09-08, 02:04 AM.

  • #2
    I think most of the places require results from a standardised test like the SAT in addition to your high school transcript.
    The schools don't seem to take many students, but then I have no idea how many actually apply in the first place. I've read some people say schools like Tsukuba want a GPA of 3 but I'm not sure.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by GinkgoL3af View Post
      I am thinking of going to a G30 university such as Kyushu, Tsukuba, Nagoya etc, but I'm wondering what the requirements are to be accepted.... I'm wondering if anyone has an idea of what the requirements are and chances to get in, and what the chances are to get scholarships if I were to get very high marks the first year.
      It seems you have not even looked at their homepages, e.g. :

      www.global.tsukuba.ac.jp/‎

      "The evaluation process has two rounds. In the first round, your academic ability and study plan (personal statement) will be evaluated. Individuals who do not pass this round are eligible for a 13,000 yen refund. The second round is an interview by teleconferencing. In this, we are looking to get a feel for your suitability for the program. Specifically, we are interested in your career and life goals, and how a degree from Tsukuba will help you achieve those goals. The interview also give you a chance to ask us questions, to help you decide whether you would like to join our program.

      You can include a SAT score to support your application to the University of Tsukuba. The Institutional SAT Code of the University of Tsukuba is "7264". Note: Submission of a SAT score is
      OPTIONAL. It is not a requirement for the application. "

      A good indication what there are looking for is the 'letter of reference' :

      ------------------Letter of Reference ------------------@
      ..
      3. Please check the appropriate box for the applicant in terms of each of the following:
      Exceptional (5) Well above average(4) Above average (3) Average(2) Below average(1) Unable to judge (0)
      Academic performance ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
      Proficiency in spoken English ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
      Proficiency in written English ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
      Ability to pursue independent study ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
      Motivation to study in Japan ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
      Leadership ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
      Emotional maturity ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
      Adaptability to new social environments ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
      Cross-cultural knowledge ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐

      ‚SDWhat are the applicantfs academic strengths and weaknesses?
      5. What has been the applicantfs greatest achievements (academic performance, awards, extra-curricular activities or other special talents) ? "

      "Scholarships
      The University provides a limited number of scholarships for high performing students.

      The Tsukuba Scholarship is available to the undergraduate students, and comes with a 60,000 yen per month stipend.
      Second through fourth year undergraduate Tsukuba Scholarships are also available. These scholarships pay 60,000 yen per month, and last for 12 months. The second year scholarship covers tuition.

      Currently, approximately 25% of incoming first year undergraduate students receive a Tsukuba Scholarship. In later years, students which distinguish themselves academically will be eligible for the Tsukuba Scholarship.

      A wide variety of other scholarships are also available, such as the Japan Student Service Association (JASSO). The JASSO scholarship pays 48,000 yen per month. Generally, students who do not receive the Tsukuba Scholarship enjoy a high rate of success.

      This year approximately 50% of our students received a scholarship."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ttokyo View Post
        It seems you have not even looked at their homepages, e.g. :

        www.global.tsukuba.ac.jp/‎

        "The evaluation process has two rounds. In the first round, your academic ability and study plan (personal statement) will be evaluated. Individuals who do not pass this round are eligible for a 13,000 yen refund. The second round is an interview by teleconferencing. In this, we are looking to get a feel for your suitability for the program. Specifically, we are interested in your career and life goals, and how a degree from Tsukuba will help you achieve those goals. The interview also give you a chance to ask us questions, to help you decide whether you would like to join our program.

        You can include a SAT score to support your application to the University of Tsukuba. The Institutional SAT Code of the University of Tsukuba is "7264". Note: Submission of a SAT score is
        OPTIONAL. It is not a requirement for the application. "

        A good indication what there are looking for is the 'letter of reference' :

        ------------------Letter of Reference ------------------@
        ..
        3. Please check the appropriate box for the applicant in terms of each of the following:
        Exceptional (5) Well above average(4) Above average (3) Average(2) Below average(1) Unable to judge (0)
        Academic performance ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
        Proficiency in spoken English ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
        Proficiency in written English ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
        Ability to pursue independent study ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
        Motivation to study in Japan ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
        Leadership ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
        Emotional maturity ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
        Adaptability to new social environments ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
        Cross-cultural knowledge ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐

        ‚SDWhat are the applicantfs academic strengths and weaknesses?
        5. What has been the applicantfs greatest achievements (academic performance, awards, extra-curricular activities or other special talents) ? "

        "Scholarships
        The University provides a limited number of scholarships for high performing students.

        The Tsukuba Scholarship is available to the undergraduate students, and comes with a 60,000 yen per month stipend.
        Second through fourth year undergraduate Tsukuba Scholarships are also available. These scholarships pay 60,000 yen per month, and last for 12 months. The second year scholarship covers tuition.

        Currently, approximately 25% of incoming first year undergraduate students receive a Tsukuba Scholarship. In later years, students which distinguish themselves academically will be eligible for the Tsukuba Scholarship.

        A wide variety of other scholarships are also available, such as the Japan Student Service Association (JASSO). The JASSO scholarship pays 48,000 yen per month. Generally, students who do not receive the Tsukuba Scholarship enjoy a high rate of success.

        This year approximately 50% of our students received a scholarship."
        I did see this, and was looking to see if anyone can shed more light on it. For example, it seems they do not check your high school grades at all. It says you give a "personal statement" of your academic ability and plan, so I'm assuming that that is where you just write what your plan to do and how you think you'll achieve it and such

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by GinkgoL3af View Post
          . For example, it seems they do not check your high school grades at all.
          That sounds like wishful thinking to me. It says they will evaluate your academic ability. How else would they do that? Unless this really is a LCD cash grab as some have claimed, I think unfairly, they're not going to let in any Tom, ____ or Harry. Universities good enough to join the G30 are also exclusive enough to have standards, and academic standards are expressed in grades.

          At any rate, there are a ton of threads on this very topic, so try the search function. There are also a few members that are either on the G30 programme or teaching it, so hopefully they will check in occasionally and give some advice and information. Another idea would be to post on any existing threads you do find as many might have setup an email alert and would then see that the thread has gone live again.

          They seem to be a helpful group. Anyways, good luck.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by kurogane View Post
            That sounds like wishful thinking to me. It says they will evaluate your academic ability. How else would they do that? Unless this really is a LCD cash grab as some have claimed, I think unfairly, they're not going to let in any Tom, ____ or Harry. Universities good enough to join the G30 are also exclusive enough to have standards, and academic standards are expressed in grades.

            At any rate, there are a ton of threads on this very topic, so try the search function. There are also a few members that are either on the G30 programme or teaching it, so hopefully they will check in occasionally and give some advice and information. Another idea would be to post on any existing threads you do find as many might have setup an email alert and would then see that the thread has gone live again.

            They seem to be a helpful group. Anyways, good luck.
            Thanks, it would be nice to talk to someone who's on the program, so I'll try that.

            Comment


            • #7
              As a note on your hopes for a scholarship, I would not bet the farm on those percentage rates of assistance received meaning you will get any of it. Keep in mind that most of the kids receiving the better ones are probably from Developing Countries, and since you are North American (I assume), you are probably not eligible for most of those, so your chances will not be as good, though the second year and JASSO options might be a better bet. Tsukuba has a big International Development Studies role, and a very large International Students contingent, and many of those students are from less developed countries. Most of the public scholarship assistance will go to them, unless things have changed. The only First Worlders that get good government scholarships are the cream of the cream of the crop, and that is usually only for graduate studies.

              OTOH, Japanese national university tuition is comparatively reasonable, and you will be able to work part time as a student, so that should also help.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by GinkgoL3af View Post
                I'm wondering if anyone has an idea of what the requirements are ...
                I did see this, and was looking to see if anyone can shed more light on it. For example, it seems they do not check your high school grades at all. It says you give a "personal statement" of your academic ability and plan, so I'm assuming that that is where you just write what your plan to do and how you think you'll achieve it and such
                OK, still more slowly. The questionnaire is there for a reason and it indicates what criteria they are looking for, i.e. English skills, academic potential, personality and connection to Japan. If you have no other 'academic performance' than your high school degree, that would obviously be the base for the evaluation in that field.
                And no, you cannot write the letters of reference yourself, only the motivation letter.

                "------------------Letter of Reference ------------------@
                ..
                Please check the appropriate box for the applicant in terms of each of the following:
                Exceptional (5) Well above average(4) Above average (3) Average(2) Below average(1) Unable to judge (0)
                Academic performance ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
                Proficiency in spoken English ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
                Proficiency in written English ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
                Ability to pursue independent study ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
                Motivation to study in Japan ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
                Leadership ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
                Emotional maturity ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
                Adaptability to new social environments ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
                Cross-cultural knowledge ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐
                ‚SDWhat are the applicantfs academic strengths and weaknesses?
                5. What has been the applicantfs greatest achievements (academic performance, awards, extra-curricular activities or other special talents) ? "

                Edit : Do others agree that 'leadership' might be a trick question, i.e. you should mabe be 'above average' but neither 'execptional' nor 'below average' ?
                Last edited by ttokyo; 2013-09-10, 09:04 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yea I've heard people have had reasonable success getting the Jasso scholarship. Another thing thats been on my mind is I've heard you need to have a large amount of money in your bank for them to see (bank statement), which I've heard is something ridiculous like $30,000. Obviously, being 23 I don't have 30K lying in my bank. My plan was to tutor english to pay for my living expenses (accommodation, food etc) and use student loans to pay for tuition, which leads me to my next question. Am I able to get student loans for the four years of school there to pay for tuition? I'm from Canada

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have absolutely no idea about student loans and all that. Given how reasonable the tuition is for G30, it should be alright in terms of the maximum loan amount and that, but no idea about eligibility and all that. Why not go to a university or community college near you and ask one of the advisors about it?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by GinkgoL3af View Post
                      Another thing thats been on my mind is I've heard you need to have a large amount of money in your bank for them to see (bank statement), which I've heard is something ridiculous like $30,000. Obviously, being 23 I don't have 30K lying in my bank. My plan was to tutor english to pay for my living expenses (accommodation, food etc) and use student loans to pay for tuition, which leads me to my next question. Am I able to get student loans for the four years of school there to pay for tuition? I'm from Canada
                      Part of Tsukaba's application process is a document where you have to "describe your financial plan for study and living expenses in detail." I'm too lazy to find out whether there is no requirement about a specific amout in the bank for other institutions. But as far as I remember, immigration wants to make sure people are reasonably stable financially before granting a student visa. Having $ 30,000 would obviously cover these points.

                      I do not think that a Japanese bank would grant a student loan to a foreigner, but JASSO does : http://www.jasso.go.jp/shougakukin/index_e.html
                      No idea whether a Canadian institution would grant a loan to study aborad.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Edit : JASSO says the loans are for Japanese students only....sorry... but they have an overview of scholarships....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Guess I'll just have to see if I can get any loans here that I could use abroad.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yes, of course all G30 universities will want to see your High School transcript.
                            (see Step 8 on http://www.global.tsukuba.ac.jp/apply/life.html or section 8-4 of http://www.global.tsukuba.ac.jp/appl...LES%202013.pdf)

                            We get more applications than we have slots available, but at least at Tsukuba, grades are not everything. However, I think if you're packing much less than a 3.0GPA or higher (and nowadays, I'd say even that'd be on the low side), you'd better have a real good explanation for why your High School GPA is not a fair representation of your academic potential.

                            Scholarships; probably a very high likelihood (90%+) in 1st year, if you're accepted. After that, it depends upon your grades. Probably no better than 50% of students will get one. We do look at both your academic progress and your need, but we don't discriminate based upon citizenship. You will need some money in your bank account to get the visa - some vague notion that you'll teach English won't impress immigration (nor should it). Generally, this is about $10,000 for a national university. Of course, having a scholarship waiting for you makes that easier.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Speak of It, and It shall appear I was going to PM you a heads up, but I couldn't remember your username. Now I gotz it.

                              Originally posted by YMO View Post
                              @However, I think if you're packing much less than a 3.0GPA or higher (and nowadays, I'd say even that'd be on the low side), you'd better have a real good explanation for why your High School GPA is not a fair representation of your academic potential

                              A very good point.


                              Originally posted by YMO View Post
                              Scholarships; probably a very high likelihood (90%+) in 1st year, if you're accepted. After that, it depends upon your grades. Probably no better than 50% of students will get one..
                              I don't quite get the arithmetic there, and perhaps the OP won't either. How can the likelihood of getting a scholarship be at 90% in 1st year if no more than 50% of students will get one?

                              Keep in mind, the OP admits his/her grades are not good, and in Canada that usually means crap (C+ to B-/B). Appalling to hear that need is being factored into the scholarship equation, btw. Are these Japanese style scholarships (i.e. loans and bursaries that are to be repaid), or more Western style awards?

                              Also, as a general question, is there much of a Mature Student status (over 21 at application) or any consideration given to such applicants in the sense that their strict academic record is weighed in balance with their experience and achievements since leaving school? It's quite a development here in Canuckleland. I think it very progressive.

                              OP,

                              You might be better off putting in a year at a local community college at home to prove your academic worth, or just doing your degree here in Canada, where your Mature Student status will greatly ameliorate a crappy grade average, bursaries are available based on need not grades, and you can more easily work while you study.

                              Just as a thought, eh!?


                              Also, a Canada Student Loan will fund study abroad, but I think you are ineligible for the matching provincial funds. That's from fuzzy memory, though, so do your own homework and figger it out.
                              Last edited by kurogane; 2013-09-13, 07:42 AM.

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