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Anyone know any eikaiwa managers/owners?

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  • Anyone know any eikaiwa managers/owners?

    I've been looking for a long time but to no avail. I'm wondering what eikaiwa's retention rates are? If a hundred new students come and there contracts run out what percent resign contracts? My guess is that smaller schools have higher retention but less new student(70-80%) and the bigger schools have a small retention (30-50%) and get many more students.

    If anyone has any info or even guesses I'm all ears,thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by TylerDurden
    I've been looking for a long time but to no avail. I'm wondering what eikaiwa's retention rates are? If a hundred new students come and there contracts run out what percent resign contracts? My guess is that smaller schools have higher retention but less new student(70-80%) and the bigger schools have a small retention (30-50%) and get many more students.

    If anyone has any info or even guesses I'm all ears,thanks.
    echo



    .




    echo

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    • #3
      Let me contact my friend who is an owner. I am pretty sure he will give me the details. I know one thing that really helps his school are the BBQ's, parties and other special events he throughs for the kids and older students.

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      • #4
        I have about 160 students and lose between 2 and about 10 every year. Contrary to the previous poster's pal I only teach. I don't have parties, BBQs or any other events simply one hour a week of lessons.

        Actually I would love to lose more in order to get fresher students as both I and the students go stale after years together. But on the other hand when students leave, for no good reason, it does slightly depress me. Double edged sword

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        • #5
          If you don't mind, how many new students do you usually get?Do you teach mostly adults or kids?

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          • #6
            About 10 years ago it was about half and half but I've been culling the adults and only have 15 left, some of these are man to man classes in the early afternoon. My aim is to finish at 7:30 every night and I'm busy with children till then.


            I can't really say how many students I get every year it ranges from 10 to 20. I do however have to decline students because my classes are full. I reckon I had to refuse about 10 last year all except one will join next year in April.

            I'm kind of lucky in that many years ago I landed a really well-paying job in a large kindergarten. Not only is the money good and the owners really nice but it gives me about 80% of my new students.

            I am a litle concerned about next year as a lot of my students are in 6th grade and if a student is going to stop entering JHS is often the time.

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            • #7
              My retention rate for my kid is pretty high and not a problem but my adult rate is pretty dismal, we have a lot of new students always coming in and if my overall rate is 70% I'm pretty happy but I was wondering what a "normal" adult retention rate was, and I'm really curious to know NOVA's retention rates

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              • #8
                Tyler - do you teach the adults yourself or do you employ

                Teachers? That might be the answer to your question about adult retention rates.

                From my experience of being the sole teacher at a small eikaiwa for my first few years in Japan, I found that adult students were happy with being taught by one person, not a passing parade of teachers.

                My retention rate at that eikaiwa (I didn't own it) was good I think it's fair to say - I lost about 2 adults the first year then over the next few years it was a total of 4.
                That was 6 adult students over 4 years. I feel happy with that record.

                Their reasons?

                The 3 who quit later enjoyed a good student-teacher relationship with me. They were all elementary school teachers and in the end found they were staying later and later at school. They couldn't make it to their usual class time and couldn't make a later time because they were all married and had the kids and husband to think of.

                The other lady who quit later couldn't attend during the week because of other commitments and came to class on Saturday. She lost her job as a careworker at a school for handicapped students.

                She had been coming for 2 years to her private class. I said we could slash the fee and she could keep her class on Saturday but she had a lot on her plate and ended up going off to another city for work.

                The first 2 adults who quit? I don't take responsibility for that - I think my boss does. I was new and appalled to find a woman in her late 50s with poor English skills -'Went the baby to see' etc - studying with two men who were streets ahead of her.

                My boss put different level students in the same class because the time was convenient for him when he taught them. I would never have done this as I believe you demonstrate integrity by putting on more classes to accommodate different level students.

                With the lady were two men - one was in his late 40s and mediocre but superior to the lady and the third student was a man in his 60s who was almost fluent. You can imagine what it was like trying to teach that class - I was going to lose no matter what.

                The lady quit blaming the 60 plus year old for dominating the class, but he didn't. If anything he should have quit because the level was lowered to accommodate the other two.
                When just the two men were studying the man in his late 40s also got a touch of the insecurities and quit.

                This worked out fine for me - I enjoyed teaching the near fluent man and later was able to get another older student with similar ability into his class.

                But back to you - some schools have a policy of 'fresh' teachers which can mean ineffective, inexperienced people with no sensitivity towards the situation and no skills to accommodate different levels and ages of adults. Do your teachers get shown the door after 1 year even if they are popular?

                Or another scenario - do you have mixed level students together? Japanese adults can be very, very insecure about English and rather than admit they can't hack it they will blame the better students. In my case the problem was half with the woman who was poor at English and half on the school - I wasn't allowed to give her a different class.

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                • #9
                  Another scenario - if you employ teachers

                  are they experienced in teaching adults? If not, they can be poor at what they do and you have to be careful with adults as they will notice more than kids who can be entertained.

                  My successor at the eikaiwa was a big, fat Aussie woman who had no experience teaching adults. Not what I would have employed but my boss was starry eyed about her Geos CV. He was not in Japan so employed her sight unseen.

                  Her retention rates were bad - and all the adults who quit during her first six months (about 5) said the same thing. She didn't know how to teach adults. She used a book and drilled again and again. 2 of them who were happy with guided free conversation said she had no topics to talk about and treated them as if they were children. Hmm.

                  With the same students I had used a book sometimes, other times had topics prepared and learnt quickly which adult classes were adept at ditching the book and moving on to discussions.

                  This woman had no such skill or insight. I can't just blame Geos for that - I think it was her personality fundamentally and perhaps lack of intelligence in terms of communicating with the Japanese.

                  When she first came to the school to be trained we shared the same digs and I did everything to show her the ropes. I went way above the call of duty, did nice things like buy her a bento lunch the first time we met, etc.

                  Her response? Giving me a reluctant thank you at the end of the training (in which I warned her about the J _____ who stiffed me - don't know why, I wish I hadn't) and nickel and diming me for the neighbourhood fees for the month in which I was to leave the digs.

                  As well as demanding the last 5 yen for the last gas bill. After I had paid all the NHK fees for the time she was with me because it was my tv.

                  The school collapsed and she cut and ran. Not the kind of teacher you'd want to employ especially teaching adults.

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