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Future prospects in academia?

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  • Originally posted by Gaijin 06
    Back up your assertion that a 4 year course must be better than a 3 year course, given that the material covered could be identical and taking 4 years to cover 3 years worth of material could be an indication of poorer secondary education and/or lazy timetables.
    My dear friend, I didn't say the material is the same. Precisely what I said was that given the same amount of workload 'per year', 5 is more then 3.

    You seem interested on reading only what you want to read.

    And again, nothing against the UK unis. Simply that there people graduate in less time. That's it.

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    • Originally posted by Gaijin 06
      Back up your assertion that a 4 year course must be better than a 3 year course, given that the material covered could be identical and taking 4 years to cover 3 years worth of material could be an indication of poorer secondary education and/or lazy timetables.
      As a second part of my answer, let's assume I did state that the TOTAL workload is the same after 3 or 4 years. Even given this scenario (which I did not defend/presented at all), even in this scenario, I do think a student can learn more by stretching the learning time.
      Again, this is not the scenario I presented.

      Ah... I hope I am not coming across as a zealote. Sorry if my tone isn't the right one. I didn't mean to be aggressive. I have the feeling by reading my own post I may give this sensation (sensations, great movie from mr. braun btw...)...

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      • Originally posted by Gaijin 06
        Back up your assertion that a 4 year course must be better than a 3 year course, given that the material covered could be identical and taking 4 years to cover 3 years worth of material could be an indication of poorer secondary education and/or lazy timetables.
        Finally, if you believe the Guardian

        http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...ighereducation

        Hepi shows how much less teaching and study time students at English universities get compared to their counterparts in the rest of Europe. It's not just that a degree in Germany takes more than six years, or that one in Spain takes more than five, compared with the UK's three or four years to graduation. We knew that. But the intensity of study on a weekly basis is less. A student in England typically puts in 25 hours of lectures and private study a week, compared with more than 30 in the Netherlands or Germany, or 35 in France.

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        • Originally posted by jj-peasuke
          And again, nothing against the UK unis. Simply that there people graduate in less time. That's it.
          You seem to be changing your tune, given your previous comments:

          Originally posted by jj-peasuke
          From my personal experience (engineering, telecom), phd graduates from uk universities lack in basic/fundamental areas.
          Originally posted by jj-peasuke
          when it comes to an academic curricula, it would be innocent to think that the same person will learn the same following 3 years of courses than following 5.
          Originally posted by jj-peasuke
          And clearly, the UK unis are based on a macdonalds principle-> take the client in (student), get the cash, and get rid of him quickly, so you have space for the next student...
          Maybe they don't teach you logical thinking or coherency at European universities ;-) Maybe this should be tacked on in a 7th year?

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          • Originally posted by Gaijin 06
            You seem to be changing your tune, given your previous comments:







            Maybe they don't teach you logical thinking or coherency at European universities ;-) Maybe this should be tacked on in a 7th year?
            It is simply I don't want a confrontation for such a nugatory issue. If that means tune down in order to chill out, I will, it is OK.

            (sorry, I did learn the word nugatory recently, and I wanted to use it..).

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            • @ Bunny

              Yeah, it also depends how much time the people are putting into it. A few people I know have gone into extended years doing PT graduate studies. This girl however... has been a full time student...and will get a masters degree cause she doesn't have enough done :P.

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              • Originally posted by Riz
                @ Bunny

                Yeah, it also depends how much time the people are putting into it. A few people I know have gone into extended years doing PT graduate studies. This girl however... has been a full time student...and will get a masters degree cause she doesn't have enough done :P.
                That's true enough. There are other factors, of course. One of my friends had trouble with her supervisor, which led to a delay of a couple of years. She stuck with it, but I wonder if it was worth the effort in the end. It's not like a PhD is a guarantee for employment. I mean, put in five hard years at almost any company and you'll probably earn much more in the long run.

                Personally, I think a good Masters has a lot going for it!

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                • Originally posted by Danger Man
                  Although very rare, it is possible to finish a PhD in under three years.

                  I knew somebody who did his in around 20 months.
                  Kill him. Double tap to the back of the head.

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                  • Actually, I would think a history degree would be one of the most feasible for such a timely completion. Not that it is not an accomplishment of exceptional industry and discipline, but if you actually go to the library and archives and do some work every day, 2 professional indolents like you 2 would be amazed how much work gets done. Hell, I spent at least 18 months of my PhD just skiing and Thinking Very Hard about Getting More Work Done Tomorrow.

                    It's when you need to fulfill fieldwork requirements and language proficiency scuzzlebugs that completion schedules really bog down.

                    I was on fieldwork for 3 years, and still managed to get lectured upon my return from the wilderness by a few part timer Herberts that had managed to sneak out with 8 months of fieldwork due to financial hardship.

                    The fact is, most quickly completed PhDs are done by younger students who desperately want the hell out of Uni (and only realised that 6 months in to the PhD they started right out of undergrad), or exceptionally disciplined and motivated exceptions.

                    For the most part, they are not of stellar quality, and are usually not even close to being publication worthy without significant revision, and usually further research.

                    On the other hand, now that G06 and JJ-Peaspoo have calmed down, here is the poop:

                    an American PhD is considered an Ultimate Achievement, and a de facto Professional Certification, and given the much higher rates and tendencies to bureaucracy and group confomity in American Society compared to the UK, it is hardly surprising that they would load their degree requirements with Rules, and Courses, and Hurdles (Oh My!).

                    An UK PhD, on the other hand, is considered an ultimate degree, but not a professional certification per se; hence the tendency to get people In & Out. It is usually expected that a new PhD will often take on a postdoctoral or research fellow position for several years to hone his skills, and since few PDs or RFs besides the Lucky Few are very well paid, it should be and usually is viewed as a part of the overall internship preceding Craftsman Status.

                    I went to the UK for my postgraduate studies because I had been out of academics for several years, and was not interested in the highly regimented degree systems in place at UBC (Vancouver), as well as for specific theoretical and personal reasons: my supervisor in the UK was by far the most welcoming to my initial enquiries, had an interesting theoretical model I wished to apply to Japan, and, in a negative light, the Japanese specialist at UBC is a raving, menopausal harridan who, after her young son pointed out that my Japanese was better than hers, promptly noted that I would require At Least 3 years of full time Japanese study before I could expect to go on fieldwork.

                    And the rest is Anthropology.

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                    • Originally posted by kurogane
                      For the most part, they are not of stellar quality, and are usually not even close to being publication worthy without significant revision, and usually further research.
                      lolz. spoken like a true scholar. if you show me your publications I'll revise them for you. like when you said Sumo is the only Shinto related sport. hell I should get a PhD. lol

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                      • Originally posted by kurogane
                        ...JJ-Peaspoo...
                        Funny indeed.

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                        • Originally posted by shibuyabj
                          I find that people who play the "Others resent my genius" card as much as you are often staggeringly blind to their own character blemishes. ...
                          Others like you, you mean?

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                          • shut the ____ up kurogane. everyone knows your full of ____. if you are gonna lie, be more realistic. PhD? LOL

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