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Working options for a non native English spouse

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  • #16
    Originally posted by adzee1 View Post
    But are you legally allowed to work as an English teacher if you are not a native speaker ? Here in Korea you are not.
    If you apply for your OWN working visa as an English teacher, immigration will ask for yor qualifications and might reject somebody from Mexico who has no relevant experience. But in your case, your wife will get a dependent visa. Then she can (on application) legally work 20 hrs a week.
    If she likes english teaching and working with kids, an international kindergarden might be a possibility as well for teaching.

    Yes, her job chances will depend on her skills and experience but the advantage will be that she is already in Japan and will have a visa, so that puts her ahead of many other candidates

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    • #17
      Permission to Engage in an Activity Other than that Permitted by the Status of Residence Previously Granted

      Foreigners with employment-prohibited visas such as students cannot, in principle, earn money by working. However, by obtaining permission to engage in an activity other than that permitted by the status of residence previously granted, part-time employment is permitted under certain restrictions. Additionally, even if you have a visa that allows employment, by obtaining this permission, you can have secondary employment under certain restrictions as long as it does not negatively affect the activity permitted by your current visa status. However, there are types of employment that are restricted, such as adult entertainment business, as well as restricted working hours, so strictly adhere to your employment conditions.
      To apply, fill in the application form, and submit it along with other necessary documents and a service charge at the immigration bureau. However, submitting the application does not guarantee that you will receive the permission. For details, contact the immigration bureau. The Fukuoka Gyoseishoshi Lawyers Association offers free consultations on various procedures for status of residence, so feel free to visit them for more knowledge and information.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by KansaiBen View Post
        Permission to Engage in an Activity Other than that Permitted by the Status of Residence Previously Granted
        I am dying to know*: what activities did the Japanese government let you in to do? And was that immigration person summarily moved to a window seat as a result?

        Back to the OP: The more I think about it, the more an international kindergarten seems like a good possibility. I'd check into that if I were you.

        Inquisitively,
        A.

        *Figure of speech. I could not care less about you.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Agitator View Post
          I am dying to know*: what activities did the Japanese government let you in to do? And was that immigration person summarily moved to a window seat as a result?

          Again its not clearly spelt out in the website but if the link to the working holiday program is any indication it includes jobs that fall into the pink trade: working as a host or a hostess, "dancer", pachinko parlors or gambling establishments, or in the skin (deru-heru) trade. Some WHV people have been known to work in regular bars as waiters and waitresses.

          Usually its left up to the discretion of immigration as to what is permitted and what is not.

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          • #20
            Thanks guys, I will investigate with some Kindys etc to test the water but we will probably wait until we are in Japan, then I suppose with the dependents visa in hand she can go around and see whats available face to face as I would imagine she will have a better chance especially if she is just looking for part time hours.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by adzee1 View Post
              Thanks guys, I will investigate with some Kindys etc to test the water but we will probably wait until we are in Japan, then I suppose with the dependents visa in hand she can go around and see whats available face to face as I would imagine she will have a better chance especially if she is just looking for part time hours.
              I don't know where you will be staying, but where I am, even getting part-time work as a language teacher is pretty tough as there is an oversupply of eager foreigners ready to do the smallest number of hours for even the ____iest pay.

              A good alternative might be to work as a freelance teacher, advertise on websites like mysensei.com. Depending on the area there might be truck loads of other foreginers advertising for the language you want to teach, but you can compete on price. You can also set your own schedule, which could be nice if your wife needs a flexible schedule for one reason or other.

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              • #22
                Try teaching at GABA

                If she's hot try hostess/soapland/health delivery

                If she's ugly maybe she can work as a cleaner or elderly helper

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                • #23
                  shoot me a PM if you'll be in the kansai region by chance. my wife is looking for private spanish lessons!

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                  • #24
                    I recently arrived in Japan and have a dependent visa. I have got my "Permission to Engage in an Activity Other than that Permitted by the Status of Residence Previously Granted" and I don't have a position yet. There was a bit on the form for details of your employer, but I just ticked the box for language teaching and put something vague like language schools/university/private students, 24 hours a week in the hours box, guessed a wage based on about 2,500y/hr and then left the rest blank. (The maximum was 28 hours a week). I waited around for 15 mins or so, and then got my passport back with a tag in it to say I'd applied, and I had to go back and pick it up a week or so later. They didn't ask for any other proof (degree, teaching certificate, etc), it seemed to just be a formality. Oh, on the form it did say you couldn't do adult entertainment or hostess work! I got my re-entry permit at the same time to save trekking back to the immigration office again.

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