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Any non-Japanese heritage individuals here get a job in Japan as a V?

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  • #31
    Please never ever again refer to any identifiable humanoid as a "Non-Japanese Heritage Individual".

    If you ever do that again, I will assume you are a fat, sexually ambivalent middle-aged white charity foundation employee.

    And you don't want that.

    Anyways, as for a place to live:

    go to www.homes.co.jp

    3 months or so ago I found perfectly acceptably sized apartments in central Tokyo (Shinjuku and Shibuya Ward); 35 sq. metres and above was one of my conditions.

    There was a whole range of rents, but I remember some coming in at 40,000 per month.

    Commuting into Tokyo will kill even the hardiest Samurai Spirit (cue the Gong!), and besides, you're not white, and semi-rural and rural folk are at least stupid, if not outright racist a lot of the time when it comes to mutlicultural issues, such as your very being.

    The City calls you, Grasshopper!!!!!!!!!!!

    Good luck.

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    • #32
      Welcome to the forum. As you are divulging very little information, I have to make many assumptions, but it seems very much that your 'top choice' company is quite stingy. Well, with a major in Philosphy and burger flipping experience you might not expect the same conditions that the top consulting or financial companies are offering. No relocation and housing for foreigners is already bad and answering your request for support with a link to a real estate website is almost abusive. Why are they travelling to the US for recruitment ? Maybe your hiring manager gets a nice bonus for recruiting a foreigner on 'japanese' terms.
      In short, don't expect anything from the company. Just bide your time for the next 2-3 years, soaking up experience and skills and then make a move to a foreign company in Tokyo who will treat you fairly.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by kurogane View Post
        Please never ever again refer to any identifiable humanoid as a "Non-Japanese Heritage Individual".
        I basically wanted to distinguish foreigners of non-Japanese heritage from those of Japanese heritage because the two get treated very differently in the recruitment process. In my experience, I have met very few people who have attempted to do A along with other Japanese college students, so I was referring to a small subset of 1.) undergraduate university students outside of Japan that are also 2.) not native speakers of Japanese and would otherwise be treated as Japanese.

        You're free to think of me all you'd like-- I'm not here to make sure you like me. I will, however, thank you for your link and show my appreciation

        Originally posted by ttokyo View Post
        Welcome to the forum. As you are divulging very little information, I have to make many assumptions, but it seems very much that your 'top choice' company is quite stingy. Well, with a major in Philosphy and burger flipping experience you might not expect the same conditions that the top consulting or financial companies are offering. No relocation and housing for foreigners is already bad and answering your request for support with a link to a real estate website is almost abusive. Why are they travelling to the US for recruitment ? Maybe your hiring manager gets a nice bonus for recruiting a foreigner on 'japanese' terms.
        In short, don't expect anything from the company. Just bide your time for the next 2-3 years, soaking up experience and skills and then make a move to a foreign company in Tokyo who will treat you fairly.
        Thanks. Glad to be here. A few points in your comment that I will address:

        First of all, I'm not sure who or what a hiring manager is. Are they one of the 15 or so people that interviewed me? I have never once asked a middleman or employment agency to find me a job; I did everything at the career forum and applied on my own. If you're referring to the HR people from the company, well I would assume their job is to find people they think the company can use (or abuse).

        Second, I assume you have no idea what BCF is. Here's a link to the list of companies that participated at the career forum last November. I would be surprised if you had not heard of the majority of these corporations.

        Third, I assure you my "top choice" is a perfectly legitimate top choice, and that it is by no means some shady company. I will also assume that your goal in the last post was to be condescending, since I can only garner that much from your post other than your masked advice. If that wasn't your intention, well, I apologize for interpreting it that way, and I am appreciative of any sort of input (aside from comments that do not count as such).

        Fourth, my close Japanese friends who are starting employment (some at the companies in the link above, some at other major Japanese corporations) who have been helping me with emails are equally surprised that the company is not paying for relocation costs. However, I will mention that for my interviews in Japan they initially said they were not going to pay for my airplane ticket, but they did end up paying me the full cost once I got to the interview. Though I'm not expecting compensation after arriving in Japan, I haven't personally been met with anything extremely unreasonable so far in the recruitment process.

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        • #34
          There will be very little price difference between a one-room place in, say, Toshima ward or Taito ward and, say, somewhere in Kawasaki or Omiya. If you live in the latter, you'd get more space for your yen but you will be surrounded by chain restaurants and have a soul- and rib-crushing commute.

          It is quite possible to live frugally in Tokyo. Probably easier in a dense neighborhood--more options for cheap food and free/cheap entertainment.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Siitrasn View Post
            I basically wanted to distinguish foreigners of non-Japanese heritage from those of Japanese heritage .
            I sentence you to adopt this avatar:




            I hope you understand that these sentences are mandatory for such tortured elliplitical euphemistic BS.

            Anyways, listen to what others have said about living inside Tokyo rather than in Boonsville, and good luck. Life outside Boya Dai is going to be very different than inside its thick padded walls.

            I hope you enjoy it.



            Also, try not to use such ridiculous expressions just to describe someone's ethnicity when you do get to Japan.

            You come across as a gratuitously PC American stooge.

            Which I am sure you are not.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by kurogane View Post
              I hope you understand that these sentences are mandatory for such tortured elliplitical euphemistic BS.

              Also, try not to use such ridiculous expressions just to describe someone's ethnicity when you do get to Japan.

              You come across as a gratuitously PC American stooge.

              Which I am sure you are not.
              I assure you I am far from politically correct. Stooge? Yeah, probably.

              Originally posted by wzwzwz View Post
              There will be very little price difference between a one-room place in, say, Toshima ward or Taito ward and, say, somewhere in Kawasaki or Omiya. If you live in the latter, you'd get more space for your yen but you will be surrounded by chain restaurants and have a soul- and rib-crushing commute.

              It is quite possible to live frugally in Tokyo. Probably easier in a dense neighborhood--more options for cheap food and free/cheap entertainment.
              Anyways, listen to what others have said about living inside Tokyo rather than in Boonsville, and good luck. Life outside Boya Dai is going to be very different than inside its thick padded walls.

              I hope you enjoy it.
              Cool, thanks for the advice! I'll stay on the look out.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by wzwzwz View Post
                There will be very little price difference between a one-room place in, say, Toshima ward or Taito ward and, say, somewhere in Kawasaki or Omiya. If you live in the latter, you'd get more space for your yen but you will be surrounded by chain restaurants and have a soul- and rib-crushing commute.

                It is quite possible to live frugally in Tokyo. Probably easier in a dense neighborhood--more options for cheap food and free/cheap entertainment.
                That said I never really had much of a difference in any of the places I've lived in so long as I used a Japanese real estate agent. Including Minato-ku, Kita-Ku, and Setagaya-ku. I've helped many of my friends move and talk with them about their rents too and so long as the other factors like distance from station/size/age were similar.

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                • #38
                  Yes, I'm partly sarcastic, but the whole thing depends on so many factors that we don't know. Is it a Japanese or foreign-owned company ? Are you one of the first batch of foreigners being hired ? What is the business area ? Consulting and Finance usually pay better and also offer housing as this is tax-efficient. But they also are expected to work their rear ends of. Did you graduate from a 'top' college in the US. I've had friends who did a one-year stint at Keio and they told me that getting in is incredibly easy (for that year). It looks that you don't seem to get any 'bonus' for being non-Japanese, i.e. no housing, relocation, language lessons, etc. , but this differs from company to company and from candidate to candidate.
                  Make at least sure that the company is sorting out your working visa in time.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by blacksunshine View Post
                    That said I never really had much of a difference in any of the places I've lived in so long as I used a Japanese real estate agent. Including Minato-ku, Kita-Ku, and Setagaya-ku. I've helped many of my friends move and talk with them about their rents too and so long as the other factors like distance from station/size/age were similar.
                    I'm not currently located in Japan so finding a Japanese real estate agent is tough, unfortunately.

                    Originally posted by ttokyo View Post
                    Yes, I'm partly sarcastic, but the whole thing depends on so many factors that we don't know. Is it a Japanese or foreign-owned company ? Are you one of the first batch of foreigners being hired ? What is the business area ? Consulting and Finance usually pay better and also offer housing as this is tax-efficient. But they also are expected to work their rear ends of. Did you graduate from a 'top' college in the US. I've had friends who did a one-year stint at Keio and they told me that getting in is incredibly easy (for that year). It looks that you don't seem to get any 'bonus' for being non-Japanese, i.e. no housing, relocation, language lessons, etc. , but this differs from company to company and from candidate to candidate.
                    Make at least sure that the company is sorting out your working visa in time.
                    Visa is already in the works (luckily); no I'm not the first "batch" of foreigners being hired (this company has branches all over the world); define "top" college in the US; and, business area is related to IT/computer/media. I think this is just one of those times where I have to suck it up and just see how things are like once I get there.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Siitrasn View Post
                      Visa is already in the works (luckily); no I'm not the first "batch" of foreigners being hired (this company has branches all over the world); define "top" college in the US; and, business area is related to IT/computer/media. I think this is just one of those times where I have to suck it up and just see how things are like once I get there.
                      Good attitude. Work hard for two years and see how you can advance in the company (a lot of people are complaining about the 'glass-ceilings' if you have the wrong passport but there are always exceptions). If not, move on. As my boss said 'in your first job you get always ripped off'.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by ttokyo View Post
                        Good attitude. Work hard for two years and see how you can advance in the company (a lot of people are complaining about the 'glass-ceilings' if you have the wrong passport but there are always exceptions). If not, move on. As my boss said 'in your first job you get always ripped off'.
                        I'm not dead set on staying in Japan if 1) I don't like working at a Japanese company after about 2-3 years or 2) if I do find myself hitting that "glass-ceiling," though I suspect that will come a few more years down the line. I figured if I really didn't like it, I could come back to the States after 5 years abroad.

                        Also, thanks again everyone for your responses. Some were incredibly helpful, and I appreciate everyone spending time and replying in some capacity.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          This thread is a bit aged and the OP may have started working yesterday, but I'd double-check that salary figure. 400,000 yen is basically double the market rate for V. You'll find most Japanese companies paying ~200,000/month for undergrads, maybe a couple man more for people with Masters degrees. Itochu for example, supposedly one of the "elite" , starts their grads out at 205,000 yen. That said, the 200,000 yen is the base salary; depending on the company you may also get paid overtime, twice-yearly bonuses, performance bonus, a housing allowance, so on. Not saying 400,000 yen is impossible but it's worth checking again since it sounds awfully high for a Japanese company, especially in this economy.

                          FWIW I'm also a "non-Japanese heritage individual" who got a shinsotsu job from BCF. Made some posts about it years ago, feel free to search.
                          Last edited by zmcnulty; 2012-04-03, 12:45 PM.

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                          • #43
                            I was a bit surprised at the 400,000 too, since I'll be starting on 204,500/month (engineering grad).

                            Have you stayed with the same company, zmcnulty?

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                            • #44
                              Thanks for your response zmcnulty. I have not started working yet as I have not graduated from university here in the States.

                              At first I too was doubtful of the 40k figure, but on the company's website it specifically says SOO~ for w and a smaller number less than that for Z呲 (though the C for Z呲 is higher than the 20k average). I have taken a screenshot just in case, so hopefully the number will be that subtracted by taxes, etc.

                              Like the poster before me, I too am curious as to whether or not you stayed in the company. Also, what industry do you work in? If you don't mind me asking, that is.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Siitrasn View Post
                                Thanks for your response zmcnulty. I have not started working yet as I have not graduated from university here in the States.

                                At first I too was doubtful of the 40k figure, but on the company's website it specifically says SOO~ for w and a smaller number less than that for Z呲 (though the C for Z呲 is higher than the 20k average). I have taken a screenshot just in case, so hopefully the number will be that subtracted by taxes, etc.

                                Like the poster before me, I too am curious as to whether or not you stayed in the company. Also, what industry do you work in? If you don't mind me asking, that is.
                                Um, SOO~ / 12 = 333,333~ / month, not 400,000.

                                Sorry, fellow Asian math Nazi

                                but either way, 333,333 / month is a pretty decent starting salary for a non-English teaching job. Engineers usually get killed on their first few years in terms of salary and hours ;0


                                -Duy
                                Last edited by Duymon; 2012-04-07, 05:01 AM.

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