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Any type of information for a non native english speaker

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  • Any type of information for a non native english speaker

    Hello everyone,

    I'm looking for information about jobs/internships/scholarships in Japan for non english speaker.
    I understand that this might be a over debated subject but I'm new to GaijinPot so plz bare with me.
    First of all let me describe my situation so far.
    I've been trying to migrate to Japan for more than 3 years now and this year I finally manage to get some decent amount of money to spend 2 weeks in Tokyo looking around for jobs and enjoying the city as well.
    I'm currently 30 years old and not getting younger, Portuguese with a degree in Education and Multimedia Communication, a level 4 certificate in Business and a background in Management IT that I got when I attend a vocational highschool.
    I started learning Japanese 2 years ago and I fear since I had to stop due to $ problems and my Japanese went down the drain, I'm only able to say the most basic things.
    While I was in Tokyo I searched for scholarships and I tried japanese language schools and Keio Media Design School.
    In Keio I was told I could gain acess to scholarships if I enrolled but for 18.000€ for 6 months I don't think I can go that way. As for the japanese language schools they told me I needed 160h of Japanese lessons(equivalent of finishing the Minna no Nihongo book) unfortunatly I studied the Genki book and it was around 120h(lessons 2x a week for 2h) and again the scholarships would only be available after I enrolled in the school.
    I've tried the Monkagakusho scholarship in 2011 only to see my candidature be rejected. My last attempt was asking for a internship at Mitsubishi but they told me I needed to be currently enrolled in a bachelor degree so I went back to the site a made a formal unsolicited application to a job that might not exist.
    So I turn to this forum in search of ideas or sugestions on how I should face this barrier to enter in this country that I love.
    It took me 13 years to finally travel to Tokyo and those 2 weeks were the best of my life and I would love the chance to stay there and make my dream come true.
    It seems so easy for a native English speaker to stay in Japan....I have to admit that I'm jealous.

    Sorry for the long post, I thank you all in advance for any type of response to my thread.
    If you got any ideas I would be most obliged.
    Best regards.

    P.S.- I do understand that this type of post is one of the most published but please be helpfull if possible, if I was in Japan I would like to help others in my situation if i could. Thank you

  • #2
    I hear your pain, but unless a Portuguese language job opens up in an international school or multinational company needing a Portuguese speaker, then really or the last purple years since you've been here, Japan has been telling you, they're just not into you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you for your quick reply.
      Yeah I figured out that much when I went to the Hellowork establisment in Shinjuku and they only asked me for my passport and if I was an engineer.
      I don't intend in finding a job only with Portuguese as a requirement. I was thinking more about on what should I try given my education background.
      Japan maybe doesn't like my native language all that much but what about the Brazilians? They speak Portuguese too and there are tons of them in Japan!
      I'm sorry but I came here for ideas not to be put down and told to just quit.
      Anyways thank you again for the remark

      Comment


      • #4
        The Braziians work in factories, and aren't hired for their Portugese, or their education, or their Japanese, for that matter. They are hired because they work cheap, and they have heritage visas as descendants of Japanese.

        Do you want to work in a dirty, smelly factory for bad money???

        You could try contacting the Portugese Chamber of Commerce in Japan, and you could always try the Monbusho again.

        But if you didn't get the Monbusho, maybe your grades just aren't good enough, or your application not strong enough. In that event, I would strongly recommend against any of the Keio or language school options. You probably won't get the scholarships they tempt you with, and all that money will be gone.

        Why are you so stuck on moving to Japan??? A 2 week fun trip is great, and it's great you enjoyed it, but that is a world away from living and working there, especially given your poor job prospects. The reason they asked at Hello Work if you are an engineer is because that is the only type of foreign labour they really need right now. You will need to find a company willing to hire you and sponsor a visa based on your current qualifications, and that won't be easy.

        Anyways, yes, it is easier for native English speakers, and sorry about that, but don't be too sensitive about people telling you your plan is unfeasible. It sure sounds like it to me.

        Good luck.

        Comment


        • #5
          I thank you for your reply. I'm sorry if my earlier reply seemed offensive when I didn't meant for it to be.
          Now you gave some information that I didn't knew about....heritage visas. I'm aware of the poor conditions that Brazilians work in Japan. I don't understand why people are nitpicking and insisting on the Portuguese when I only referred my nationality.
          There's no Portuguese Chamber of Commerce in Japan unfortunatly I've been searching for all kinds of associations with ties to Japan.
          Yes maybe my grades don't impress the Monkagakusho commitee maybe my master's thesis wasn't what they wanted.
          I agree with you in the Keio and language schools point.
          Stuck because of 2 weeks in Japan? No, I'm sorry I've wanted this for a long time. What I've been seeing in other threads here is people who go on vacation and want to stay because they like it.This is not a thing of the moment but a long awaited dream.
          Nothing in this life is easy that's a given and I've been trying for a long time now.I don't get this agressive responses when I only asked for directions.
          Thank you I'll keep searching nothing in this life is unfeasible only trying to avoid death.
          And I said I was jealous of native English speakers not that they were guilty in any way of my difficulty in moving to Japan, maybe it's you who's been too sensitive?!!

          I wish you well and good luck also

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by vallient View Post
            I hear your pain, but unless a Portuguese language job opens up in an international school or multinational company needing a Portuguese speaker, then really or the last purple years since you've been here, Japan has been telling you, they're just not into you.
            What the hell were you trying to say there? Better go sign yourself up for a lower-level EAL (sic) course.

            Coolly,
            A.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Zebugamadruga View Post
              I was thinking more about on what should I try given my education background.
              I'm going to be honest with you. Forget your educational background if you want to come here and settle down. Start thinking and specializing in "bacalhau"and get yourself into a hotel kitchen. Sign up on linkedin and get hooked up in the Japan network. Plenty of non Japanese Hotel managers will take a serious look at you .

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Zebugamadruga View Post
                I thank you for your reply. I'm sorry if my earlier reply seemed offensive when I didn't meant for it to be.
                Now you gave some information that I didn't knew about....heritage visas. I'm aware of the poor conditions that Brazilians work in Japan. I don't understand why people are nitpicking and insisting on the Portuguese when I only referred my nationality.
                There's no Portuguese Chamber of Commerce in Japan unfortunatly I've been searching for all kinds of associations with ties to Japan.
                Yes maybe my grades don't impress the Monkagakusho commitee maybe my master's thesis wasn't what they wanted.
                I agree with you in the Keio and language schools point.
                Stuck because of 2 weeks in Japan? No, I'm sorry I've wanted this for a long time. What I've been seeing in other threads here is people who go on vacation and want to stay because they like it.This is not a thing of the moment but a long awaited dream.
                Nothing in this life is easy that's a given and I've been trying for a long time now.I don't get this agressive responses when I only asked for directions.
                Thank you I'll keep searching nothing in this life is unfeasible only trying to avoid death.
                And I said I was jealous of native English speakers not that they were guilty in any way of my difficulty in moving to Japan, maybe it's you who's been too sensitive?!!

                I wish you well and good luck also
                One Japanese guy I knew 30 years ago spoke Portuguese and worked for a trading company. There are likely a few such jobs which require some Portuguese and would be beyond the education level of the Brazilian population they admitted to do factory work. But, with minimal Japanese likely very hard to get. And not being here in Tokyo is obviously a huge handicap - who would want to hire you without seeing you? Unless they have a desperate need, they would want to see you in person rather than over Skype.

                If you already have a masters then maybe Mombusho is not interested in you, but you might still keep trying. Maybe they would respect persistence. Another route is to get a job in Portugal with a company doing business in Japan and work on your Japanese on the side, maybe get a chance to get sent, or get paid to learn more Japanese or make more contacts until after some time you find somebody in Tokyo who needs your skills and knows you a little. Maybe you need to tell Mombusho that you want to get a Masters in teaching Japanese, that you want to learn and then go back to teach Japanese to Portuguese or Brazilians. They would probably love to hear that.

                What can I say? If you speak English anything like you write it you are better than many native speakers, however unfortunately you will never be able to teach English here - although who is to say it's impossible to get a low paid English teaching job teaching to children. No disrespect intended - that would just be your ticket to get over here and stay long enough to find something better.

                Wish you all the best. Don't take GP too seriously, we are mostly well intended hard realists. So many people post about wanting to come to Japan. You are more serious than most but you don't have the right native language skills and passport color, so darn hard to get a break to come here.

                Maybe you should try find a Japanese girl in Portugal who really likes Portugal and get married, then negotiate a return to Japan. Not being facetious, some Japanese are quite practical about marriage and do arranged marriages. I'm sure there are at least a few who would be interested just to avoid the dull ordinary life of being housewife to some Japanese dude who expects her to take care of everything at home while he almost never comes home. I guess this sounds extreme, maybe it is, but your desires run deep. GL, keep trying and maybe you can connect with something if you refuse to give up.

                Comment


                • #9
                  To me, it looks that you are not really serious about your future plans. On the one hand you claim that you have this 'life-long dream' of living in Japan but on the other hand, your Japanese is bad and you stopped leaning it, because you ran out of cash (but at the same time spend a lot of money for a trip to Tokyo).
                  If you want to work in Japan, you have probably two choices :

                  a) Build up on your current qualification and work experience, i.e. with a teaching degree you might want to apply at (brazilian) schools, IT work, etc.
                  b) As said above, learn a new trade that is useful ito find work in Japan, such as cooking. As you might know, Japan has a rapidly aging society and they are even importing nurses from abroad, so e.g. getting an qualification in health care. and appropriate Japanese skills would be a sure ticket to a job in Japan.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you for the advice AW1.
                    I'm already signed into linkedin, but I don't know how to search for a Japanese network in Linkedin. Can I ask you for help plz?
                    I have experience working as a kitchen hand in a Italian restaurant do you think it might help?
                    Thank you again for you advice.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hello kabunushi,

                      Thank you for taking your time and writing such a big response to my post.
                      Indeed it seems that not being in Tokyo is a handicap and you are right on my lack of Japanese proficiency. I had a weird episode while I was boarding the plane back home. A company that posted an ad in japanjobs contacted me, asking me if I was really leaving and my plans to come back to Japan and also what was the status of my visa.
                      I replied them telling them the truth and saying that yes I was leaving and yes my plan to return to Japan was to do so as soon as I got enough money. I also said that since I was Portuguese I didn't need a visa to enter Japan and I could stay for up to 3 months if I was a turist or scouting for schools or work.
                      They didn't replied to my email so after a few days I wrote back to them asking them if they were still interested and the answer I got was maybe when I'm in Tokyo I could call them and schedule not a interview but a meeting to talk....but they were elusive in the visa part.
                      As for the Mongakusho scholarship, you are right again and you're not the first person to tell me I should insist on it. My problem and again it's my problem, is that I don't know if the teachers that I asked for a recommendation letter still work at my school and I feel too embarrassed to ask them for those letter yet again.
                      The application for the scholarship ends in 1 month I think that I could only apply next year since there's just not enough time to make a proposal and gather all the documentation.
                      That idea seems interesting saying that I want to teach Japanese to Portuguese or Brazilians but wouldn't I need to be a N1 user?
                      I also tought about that searching for Japanese companies here and work my way into a company internship in Japan or something like that but as some of you might know Portugal is in the same state as Greece so things are not all that pleasant job wise, nevertheless it's a valid option that I will search for it.
                      Yeah I know I tried Interac a couple of years ago and they said I needed to have 12 years of education in a English speaking country, condition that they changed a few months ago to "only full native english speakers are allowed".
                      No worries I felt that you meant no disrespect and you made a valid point and I would like to follow up on that. I'll search for private schools who don't need native English speaker even though it may not exist.
                      I thank you for your positive and constructive criticism and I'll keep what you said about GP in mind. I'm trying to be realistic also but I need to keep trying with the tools that I was given.
                      That would be a blessing in disguise but I fear that Japanese that come here like the majority of foreigners stick to their own around here. Japanese are but a few in Portugal and normally they are couples in their late 30's 40's.
                      I think a good idea would be making contacts in Japan through social networking and such. And I'm going to speak to my old Japanese teacher and ask if I can attend her classes without enrolling in the course so I can just learn and then apply directly to the Japanese profiency test. She's a good person I think she might say yes.

                      And I leave you with a post I saw about the current state of immigration in Japan that was quite useful in getting me up to speed with Japanese immigration policies.
                      http://factsanddetails.com/japan.php...d=633&catid=18

                      I thank you again for your post that's the type of information i was looking for.
                      Best regards

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hello ttokyo,

                        So can you tell me how serious do I need to be? Should have I payed for Japanese lessons instead of finally going to Japan? I only work seasonally unfortunately the rest of the year I'm penniless. I don't get why do you feel the need to say that I'm not serious. Do you think I'm here because I like to write stories?
                        Anyways ok option a) sounds interesting if I do it I might have to think about moving abroad to another country and try my luck there because here in Portugal you might just want to forget about. Brazil yeah maybe since their economy is good right now but doesn't that defeats the purpose? Why move to Brazil to try and get a job to build experience when I want to go to Japan? Just because the language is the same?
                        As for option b) I'm thinking about going back to school and try a engineer degree in IT or something but that costs money and time so I'll have to think about it.
                        I agree with you in the Japanese part makes total sense and I'll do as I say in a earlier reply.

                        Thank you for you insight it's much appreciated.
                        Best regards

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sorry, I meant a Brazilian School in Japan. There are several around.
                          You can check for internships at kopra.org. However note that the internships are virtually unknown at Japanese companies and to get the internship visa you have to be a university student.

                          Still I stick to my point that in your situation 'speaking Japanese' would be one of the most important skills. You you said yourself :
                          "I started learning Japanese 2 years ago and I fear since I had to stop due to $ problems and my Japanese went down the drain, I'm only able to say the most basic things'"

                          You don't need to spend money to learn Japanese. You can easiiy learn Kanji from a book or with self-made flashcards. With the internet, there are so many free options as well such as podcasts.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Agitator View Post
                            What the hell were you trying to say there? Better go sign yourself up for a lower-level EAL (sic) course.

                            Coolly,
                            A.
                            "Then really for the last couple of years, since you've been here, Japan has been telling you, they're just not into you"

                            The site wouldn't let me edit it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ttokyo View Post
                              Still I stick to my point that in your situation 'speaking Japanese' would be one of the most important skills. You you said yourself :
                              "I started learning Japanese 2 years ago and I fear since I had to stop due to $ problems and my Japanese went down the drain, I'm only able to say the most basic things'"

                              You don't need to spend money to learn Japanese. You can easiiy learn Kanji from a book or with self-made flashcards. With the internet, there are so many free options as well such as podcasts.
                              I agree. Nowadays there are so many resources online or books you can buy and learn a language for free (apart from paying for the book that is).

                              A guy called Tae Kim for example, has a decent pdf for learning Japanese.

                              Also, check out this.

                              Comment

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