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"Self Sponsorship" Visa Debacle: Don't try it!

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  • "Self Sponsorship" Visa Debacle: Don't try it!

    So the job I had ended and my visa was set to expire, and I thought I'd try to go the "self-sponsorship" route to getting a visa. I let my professor visa expire, letting immigration know what I wanted to do, got a 3 month temporary visitor visa to get the jobs/paperwork I needed to get a new visa AND had immigration give me a print out from a moj website (here, for those of you who dare: http://www.moj.go.jp/ONLINE/IMMIGRAT...enko10_11.html) to show employers. As much as immigration can be a labyrinth to get through, the self-sponsorship route is so very awful and a big mistake due to the following:

    1)Most employers will not look at you unless you have a valid visa.

    2)If you manage to get your foot in the door, most hiring managers are utterly clueless about this potential route to getting a visa, and have no time to be educated on it as they presume you are wrong and they know all there is to know about visa sponsorship - regardless of what you tell them and what information from immigration you show them.

    3)The "main school" that is required to fill out your visa forms is usually going to be a large chain as they can guarantee hours where part-time jobs can not, and large chains are full of the people mentioned in 2).

    That said, I still managed to get 4 part time jobs from some large and small dispatchers that pay very well by the hour, but since they assign on a class by class basis they are not in a position to be the main school I need to fill out my visa forms. I've exhausted applying to all the large chains since they give me the "huh?" look when I mention self-sponsorship and show me the door.

    So, after all this it seems my only option of even staying in Japan, where I've lived for for over a year, is to reapply for another temporary visitor visa and to try and get the same entry-level visa-sponsoring job most people who come here for the first time get.

    This is more of a rant and warning against trying to "self-sponsor" your visa, but PLEASE DO OFFER ANY SUGGESTIONS as I'm at my wit's end over all this. Is it even possible for me to get a second temp. visitor visa to look for work, the standard 1 full-time job sponsoring my visa, after immigration knows I failed at getting a steady job these past 3 months? Should I beg one of my part-time employers to just fill in the paperwork for me so I can stay and work? (And by the way, I support myself here just barely via telecommuting work for an American company which doesn't play into getting a visa at all but maybe immigration might take it into account if they look at me askew for not working these past 3 months.)

    Sigh

  • #2
    Wow, What a terrible story. Now, to be fair, you're probably not as buttnutting stoopid as your account of F@cking up everything you could in the worst possible way like some rank know-it-all newbie dumbfvcck suggests, but boy, did you ever screw up.

    I know of lots of successful self-sponsoring residents. Apparently, the process is both tranparent and relatively smooth.

    Mind you, they have been here for long over "just over a year", and unlike you, actually know what they're doing.

    So, at least you can learn from your monumental idiocy: never assume you know what you're doing untl proved otherwise. For a klutz like you, it could go a long way.



    You seem to suggest that the application process is the problem, when it fact it is your own retarded hubris that caused your dilemma.

    Oh, and major retard bonus points for letting your visa expire.

    Whadda Maroon!!!!!!!!!

    Comment


    • #3
      most people take care of the visa before it expires, so there is a seamless tranisition without having to take a touist visa as stop-gap measure. As stated privously, the "self-sponsored visa" is a poor choice of words to describe what is essentially a visa sponsored by one main sponsor of record, and several other employers rounding out a liveable contracted salary.

      Comment


      • #4
        d

        Yes. If you self-sponsor your visa before your previous visa has expired, it's a fairly straightforward process.

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        • #5
          I spent a great deal of time researching the means to get my visa through the "self-sponsorship" route, and know a colleague who successfully did so, so I was well aware of what I was undertaking. To keep from telling an equally long story I was not able to get a new visa sorted while I was still on my previous one, so that's why I needed to get the visitor visa as a means to process the new visa.

          I think the mistake I made, as referenced in my original post, was that I had no idea that the the vast majority of hiring managers have no knowledge of this means of obtaining a visa, and want no part in hearing about it.

          And, the paperwork needed to get the visa via self-sponsorship is the same whether I'm still on my original professor visa or the visitor visa, and the main issue is that hiring managers have a knee-jerk reaction to "Temporary Visitor Visa" in that they won't further your application.
          Last edited by Glamorgan; 2011-12-08, 04:40 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Glamorgan View Post
            I think the mistake I made, as referenced in my original post, was that I had no idea that the the vast majority of hiring managers have no knowledge of this means of obtaining a visa, and want no part in hearing about it.
            Partly. Any hiring manager worth working for will know about the self-sponsor option. You're right in that they want no part in it - hence the "self" bit.

            Originally posted by Glamorgan View Post
            ... the main issue is that hiring managers have a knee-jerk reaction to "Temporary Visitor Visa" in that they won't further your application.
            Yep. Plenty of valid-visa fish in the sea right now.

            For the benefit of future readers, the self-sponsor visa option works best in the historical sense - you show Immigration that you have a multi-year history of decent, steady income; taxes paid; health care paid; pension contribution; NHK fees etc. and they don't care about your primary contract anymore. One year isn't enough.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Glamorgan View Post
              So the job I had ended and my visa was set to expire, and I thought I'd try to go the "self-sponsorship" route to getting a visa. I let my professor visa expire,
              There was your first mistake. You didn't have to do that. I know you also wrote:
              "To keep from telling an equally long story I was not able to get a new visa sorted while I was still on my previous one"

              ...but you're going to have to explain more about that, or just accept the fact that whatever you did wrong was...wrong. Without details here, we can't really judge or advise well. As others have mentioned, the transition to self-sponsorship of your current visa (key word: current) is pretty straightforward. Reflect on how you got to the point of having no visa, and let us know if you can what you might have done differently.

              had immigration give me a print out from a moj website (here, for those of you who dare: http://www.moj.go.jp/ONLINE/IMMIGRAT...enko10_11.html) to show employers.
              I could be wrong, but I don't think any of that describes self-sponsorship, so it wouldn't help explain to potential employers what you wanted to do.

              1)Most employers will not look at you unless you have a valid visa.
              Maybe in your case, but there are tons (perhaps even the majority) who are willing to sponsor a visa. In self-sponsorship situations, you just have to explain better than you did.

              2)If you manage to get your foot in the door, most hiring managers are utterly clueless about this potential route to getting a visa,
              Probably so, and perhaps even true about many other facets of the visa process itself, even for regular visas.

              So, after all this it seems my only option of even staying in Japan, where I've lived for for over a year, is to reapply for another temporary visitor visa and to try and get the same entry-level visa-sponsoring job most people who come here for the first time get.
              Yup. Good luck, as December is the pits for job hunting.

              Comment


              • #8
                To reply to your main points Glenski:

                The employer I had employs teachers on a three month contract. At the end of my contract, the second time I worked for them, they stated they wanted to hire me again and would contact me once they found a suitable position, which was the same as when I was rehired the last time. As time went on and I heard nothing, I recontacted the employer who then said they had no position to offer me - about 3 weeks before my visa was set to expire - so not enough time to wrangle up enough jobs to go to immigration with to self-sponsor.

                I'm not sure how me moving from my professor visa to the temp. visitor visa was the main problem. The document I got from immigration to fill out is the "Application for Change in Status of Residence" - the same document I supposedly needed the main employer to fill out both when I had those few weeks left on my prof. visa and after I got on a visitor visa. Note that the whole time I let immigration know what I was doing, and they had no problem with it.

                What's caused me the most angst is that the part time jobs I'm getting are well-paid and competitive. Some of the hiring managers are reasonable about my visa situation and so provide me with the documents I need, but can't be my main school as they don't want to guarantee hours. The jobs that are easier to get are only interested in the regular sort of sponsorship and would rather hit the "reject" button rather than have to spend the two minutes to Google "self-sponsor Japan visa".

                Self-sponsorship seems to be a good way to go ONLY if you are CURRENTLY employed with a reasonable employer who wants to keep you around part time and thus will be the main school needed.

                Any advice?

                Originally posted by Glenski View Post
                There was your first mistake. You didn't have to do that. I know you also wrote:
                "To keep from telling an equally long story I was not able to get a new visa sorted while I was still on my previous one"

                ...but you're going to have to explain more about that, or just accept the fact that whatever you did wrong was...wrong. Without details here, we can't really judge or advise well. As others have mentioned, the transition to self-sponsorship of your current visa (key word: current) is pretty straightforward. Reflect on how you got to the point of having no visa, and let us know if you can what you might have done differently.

                I could be wrong, but I don't think any of that describes self-sponsorship, so it wouldn't help explain to potential employers what you wanted to do.

                Maybe in your case, but there are tons (perhaps even the majority) who are willing to sponsor a visa. In self-sponsorship situations, you just have to explain better than you did.

                Probably so, and perhaps even true about many other facets of the visa process itself, even for regular visas.

                Yup. Good luck, as December is the pits for job hunting.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Glamorgan View Post
                  Is it even possible for me to get a second temp. visitor visa to look for work, the standard 1 full-time job sponsoring my visa, after immigration knows I failed at getting a steady job these past 3 months? (And by the way, I support myself here just barely via telecommuting work for an American company which doesn't play into getting a visa at all but maybe immigration might take it into account if they look at me askew for not working these past 3 months.)
                  (
                  If you're not on the list of countries that can extend the 'temporary visitor' visa to 180 days, you need to make a trip outside Japan and get a new 'temporary visitor' visa when you come back. If you get this or not seems to depend on the mood of the immigration officer at Narita and the impression you make. I had no problems, but a friend was detained at Narita and he made up a story that his GF is studying for 6 months and he is staying with her. They might call to verify, check your funds, etc. It's unlikely that they have access to your past history of getting self-sponsorship. (As I read it, you never even officially applied).
                  Admitting that you work for a US company could raise some flags (working is illegal on a tourist visa), but if you're paid into an US account, that should be ok.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nobody (including me) seems to have given you anything to help, sorry..

                    But at least your post can help warn others of potential difficulties.. so it WAS worth posting.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi ttokyo,

                      I'm an American, in regards to countries where one can apply for an extension. My situation with the temporary visitor visa seems a little different though. When my prof. visa was about to expire I told the business administration wing of immigration that I planned to self-sponsor but needed time to get the jobs and paperwork required. Immigration told me to get a temporary visitor visa and I expressed clearly my reason for getting this visa was to look for work. That said, I didn't have to have a ticket to leave Japan, but now I'm wondering how immigration sees me.

                      Should I go back to the business administration wing of immigration, tell them what I've basically said above and tell them I need more time (ie the 90 extension), or tell them I'm giving up and just want to look for regular visa sponsorship via 1 school so need that 90 day extension? Or, should I not bother with business administration, thus avoiding the wait and all the explaining, and just apply for the 90 day extension without all the detail? If so, would this mean I'd need to show a ticket out of Japan?

                      And lastly, I'm not sure if this is abnormal, but on top of my temporary visitor visa is typed "Change Permit".

                      Thanks a lot!



                      Originally posted by ttokyo View Post
                      If you're not on the list of countries that can extend the 'temporary visitor' visa to 180 days, you need to make a trip outside Japan and get a new 'temporary visitor' visa when you come back. If you get this or not seems to depend on the mood of the immigration officer at Narita and the impression you make. I had no problems, but a friend was detained at Narita and he made up a story that his GF is studying for 6 months and he is staying with her. They might call to verify, check your funds, etc. It's unlikely that they have access to your past history of getting self-sponsorship. (As I read it, you never even officially applied).
                      Admitting that you work for a US company could raise some flags (working is illegal on a tourist visa), but if you're paid into an US account, that should be ok.
                      Last edited by Glamorgan; 2011-12-09, 12:13 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's a crap shoot whether immigration gives you another 90 days. I doubt it, but who knows? They don't care if you are looking for self-sponsorship or a regular work visa, but it might help them to know that you are indeed doing one or the other. Best of luck.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Glamorgan View Post
                          Hi ttokyo,

                          I'm an American, in regards to countries where one can apply for an extension. My situation with the temporary visitor visa seems a little different though. When my prof. visa was about to expire I told the business administration wing of immigration that I planned to self-sponsor but needed time to get the jobs and paperwork required. Immigration told me to get a temporary visitor visa and I expressed clearly my reason for getting this visa was to look for work. That said, I didn't have to have a ticket to leave Japan, but now I'm wondering how immigration sees me.

                          Should I go back to the business administration wing of immigration, tell them what I've basically said above and tell them I need more time (ie the 90 extension), or tell them I'm giving up and just want to look for regular visa sponsorship via 1 school so need that 90 day extension? Or, should I not bother with business administration, thus avoiding the wait and all the explaining, and just apply for the 90 day extension without all the detail? If so, would this mean I'd need to show a ticket out of Japan?
                          I very much doubt that immigration will roll out the red carpet for you and give you special treatment just because 'you need more time to look for a job'.

                          It looks like what you got was nothing special, but the normal '90 day tourist visa'. Unfortunately, Americans (unlike Brits or Irish) cannot extend their temporary visas to 6 months. http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/v...rt/novisa.html

                          Of course you can try to negotiate to extend it, but I doubt it. It looks like you need to exit and re-enter the country as a normal tourist once the current visa is up. Keep us posted...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Did I understand correctly in that you were working 4 part time jobs whilst on a TOURIST visa? If so, I wouldn't bother trying to get another. You're not supposed to look for work while on a tourist visa in the first place, so asking for yet another extension to say you're looking for work is pretty loaded. Let's not even talk about the fact that if I understood correctly you illegally worked while on a tourist visa. Just fail on all accounts.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm sorry but you're responsible for your own trouble. You let your visa expire expecting that other companies (Who may not know you very well) will take a risk on you by vouching for your (to them, unorthodox) visa application.

                              Get real!

                              Next time do your visa stuff BEFORE your current one expires.

                              Nobody to blame but yourself in this case.

                              Comment

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