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C.O.E. financial support

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  • C.O.E. financial support

    I have read lots of posts here but not too much on financial aspect of the coe.

    My financial support ( my mom) usually doesn't have a lot in her bank account . But, she makes $80,000 (\5.4000M) a year. So my question is that enough for the Japanese immigration ? Also, how can I increase my chances of getting a c.o.e?

  • #2
    What kind of visa are you trying to get?

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    • #3
      A student visa.

      Comment


      • #4
        Found this one :
        lcj.lakeland.edu/assets/forsite/admissions/cfc.pdf

        "All international applicants who wish to enroll with a student visa in Japan must submit statements certifying adequate financial resources each semester. This form must be accompanied by certification that sufficient funds will be available to meet your living and studying expenses while attending..., along with the Financial Resource Contact Information Form. Without the required financial documents, you will not receive a Certificate of Eligibility (COE), which you need to apply for a student visa.

        Acceptable forms of certifications are as follows:
        An original current personal bank letter/statement in English of your financial support (self, parent, sponsor, or sponsoring agency/organization)
        - If the currency is in anything other than Japanese Yen (JPY) or U.S. Dollars (USD), you must include the exchange rate for either of these currencies on the back of this form.
        AFFIDAVIT OF SUPPORT : As the sponsor, I will guarantee financial support for the student on this form for the entire period of his/her study"

        If the bank statement is not that high (it only needs to be high for a day) I would attach your mom's income tax statement/salary slip. Of course, immigration might still say 'if she loses her job, what are you going to do'.

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        • #5
          But the thing is how many people really have that money in the bank?
          The total expenses for the program are $30,000 usd. Hopefully I can get a student visa with my financial guarantor's ( mom) w-2 form ( taxes)
          Also , applying for kansai college's program ( 2 years)if that helps?
          Do you think 8-9 thousand would be ok? Plus if someone make 80k a year I don't think immigration would say no?
          Last edited by FukuiOsakaSan; 2013-02-20, 10:38 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by FukuiOsakaSan View Post
            But the thing is how many people really have that money in the bank?
            The total expenses for the program are $30,000 usd. Hopefully I can get a student visa with my financial guarantor's ( mom) w-2 form ( taxes)
            Also , applying for kansai college's program ( 2 years)if that helps?
            Do you think 8-9 thousand would be ok? Plus if someone make 80k a year I don't think immigration would say no?
            Some schools set their own limit for applicants, these are not immigration limits. Just submit what you have and see what happens. I've gotten a student status in the past by showing a combination of bank, tax etc, not just mine, but combined with family members. 8-9 might be fine for some, it might not be for others, it's subjective to the immigration officer (a Chinese student would have more trouble getting a student status then say a Canadian person).

            No one has the exact details immigration uses.

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            • #7
              Whatever the person's salary is, if they can't prove on paper that they have the means to support the person in question, it's not going to be possible.

              If someone makes $80,000/year and has $8,000 in savings, I'd say it looks like they are stretched way too thin to pay for schooling and support of the student.

              Nothing saying your mom has to save 99% of her yearly salary, but after years of working and stashing away a rainy day fund, plus emergency savings, etc - I'd think she'd have something more than you're stating.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by themoonrules View Post
                ....it's subjective to the immigration officer (a Chinese student would have more trouble getting a student status then say a Canadian person).
                I think you're correct. The immigration has guidelines which are flexible and a lot depends on where you come from. It's always been that way
                .
                Immigration may feel a Canadian is less likely to overstay and work illegally than someone from China and thus be more lenient with how money is required.


                .

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by frownsarefun View Post
                  Whatever the person's salary is, if they can't prove on paper that they have the means to support the person in question, it's not going to be possible.

                  If someone makes $80,000/year and has $8,000 in savings, I'd say it looks like they are stretched way too thin to pay for schooling and support of the student.

                  Nothing saying your mom has to save 99% of her yearly salary, but after years of working and stashing away a rainy day fund, plus emergency savings, etc - I'd think she'd have something more than you're stating.
                  When I got a student visa a while back I needed to use my parents income information at the time. In my case my mother also made a good amount per year over $120,000 but there was only about $20,000 in the bank(the rest was invested or moving around). The only thing I needed to show immigration was her income statements and a signed paper saying that she would support me. They never asked for any proof of whats in the bank. Also, now you can get permission to work at the same time you get your student visa, or at least as soon as you come to Japan, if you need to supplement income or support yourself.

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                  • #10
                    I'm showing her w-2 form, bank statement and the forms stating she will support me , I think that will be fine. But, I kind of worry about the essay ( for the school) stating why I want to study at kansai college & it must have a Japanese translation ( is that strange( ie. the translation. Everything else is in English .

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Adol007fm View Post
                      In my case my mother also made a good amount per year over $120,000 but there was only about $20,000 in the bank(the rest was invested or moving around). The only thing I needed to show immigration was her income statements and a signed paper saying that she would support me.
                      That's what I would have said as well. In 'industrial countries', people dont' keep that much money in bank accounts any more, but have stocks, funds and other assets. So I'd guess a combination of $ 8,000 'lying around' and a $ 80,000 proven income should be fine. If you have other assets to back it up (house, funds, etc.) even better.

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