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"be available" for visa sponsorship.

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  • "be available" for visa sponsorship.

    Hi. I was looking at some job postings and I notice some say "Must have a valid Japanese work visa or be available for sponsorship."

    I wondering what "be available for sponsorship" means. Does it mean to sponsor your own visa?

  • #2
    No. I would assume it's just a bad choice of vocabulary and they mean 'eligible for sponsorship.'

    You can't sponsor your own first visa, generally speaking.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm quite confused.

      I wish to work as an English teacher. I had a look at http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/visa/long/visa1.html and it says I will need the following documents for a visa
      (1) Passport
      (2) One visa application form (nationals of Russia or NIS countries need to submit two visa application forms)
      (3) One photograph (nationals of Russia or NIS countries need to submit two photographs)
      (4) Certificate of Eligibility (Note) - the original and one copy

      I had a look at http://www.juridique.jp/immigration.html#workvisa and based on the kind of teaching I want to do, I will need a university degree (which I have got)
      "language instruction that only require a university degree"

      Now I'm not sure what it means to be "eligible for sponsorship". Does it mean I need to obtain all the documents I mentioned on my own and have them ready for the hiring company?
      Or am I eligible so long as I have a degree and the company will help to sort out the necessary paperwork?

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      • #4
        What is your nationality?
        What kind of teaching do you want to do?
        Which visa are you looking at?

        Generally, people need to get hired first, then they file an application for their visa together with paperwork from the employer (to prove it is a legitimate relationship and that the employer is a recognized company).

        Eligible for sponsorship means that you meet immigration's requirements (proper degree, training, work experience, or combination thereof, proper nationality).

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        • #5
          I'm Singaporean and English is my native language.
          I wouldn't mind any kind of teaching, really.
          Teaching at public or private schools, private tuition... but I think my best chances would be with Eikaiwa schools.

          Looking at http://www.juridique.jp/immigration.html#workvisa:
          It says under instructor visa that "Instructors in the private language schools have to apply for "Specialist in Humanities / International Services" visa."
          and under international services visa "language instruction that only require a university degree."

          I'm thinking this refers to Eikaiwa schools.

          I heard that the public and private schools usually require a teacher's license from your home country (PGCE/PGDE?)
          I'm not a licensed teacher, but I'm CELTA and CELTA-YLX qualified with a year of work experience.
          I think ALT would be my best bet if I wanted to go that route.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by lardandweed View Post
            I'm quite confused.
            ... Now I'm not sure what it means to be "eligible for sponsorship". Does it mean I need to obtain all the documents I mentioned on my own and have them ready for the hiring company?
            Or am I eligible so long as I have a degree and the company will help to sort out the necessary paperwork?
            It means 'qualified for sponsorship' :

            "el·i·gi·ble /ˈɛləʤəbəl/ adjective
            : qualified to be chosen or to participate <eligible to be president> <eligible to retire>"

            So practically it means a degree, no recent deportation from Japan, no arrests, proof of language for non-native speakers, etc. With your background you should be fine.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lardandweed View Post
              I'm quite confused.

              I wish to work as an English teacher. I had a look at http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/visa/long/visa1.html and it says I will need the following documents for a visa
              (1) Passport
              (2) One visa application form (nationals of Russia or NIS countries need to submit two visa application forms)
              (3) One photograph (nationals of Russia or NIS countries need to submit two photographs)
              (4) Certificate of Eligibility (Note) - the original and one copy

              I had a look at http://www.juridique.jp/immigration.html#workvisa and based on the kind of teaching I want to do, I will need a university degree (which I have got)
              "language instruction that only require a university degree"

              Now I'm not sure what it means to be "eligible for sponsorship". Does it mean I need to obtain all the documents I mentioned on my own and have them ready for the hiring company?
              Or am I eligible so long as I have a degree and the company will help to sort out the necessary paperwork?
              So as I often point out on this forum, a "Visa" and a "status of residency" are two different things, but often times people confuse them as one same item.

              The information you posted is indeed the requirement to get the "Visa". However you cannot get a visa (outside of Japan) without first getting point number (4) which is a certificate of eligibility.

              To get the COE you must meet certain qualifications:
              GENERALLY SPEAKING:
              1. You need a school/company that is willing to hire you
              2. You meet Immigration requirements for a status of residency (typically speaking, a university degree).
              3. No criminal history *depends on circumstances
              4. Misc items

              Essentially if it is your first time, you need to get hired FIRST, then the company/school that hired you will then work with you and immigration to process your documents for a Certificate of Eligibility. Once your documents are processed you get a COE, then FINALLY you get the Visa stamp to enter Japan.

              If you are inside Japan, the process is slightly different because you don't need a Visa if you are in Japan (a visa is used to enter Japan to get a Status of Residency), instead the same documentation used to get a COE is instead used on a different application, which is an "APPLICATION FOR CHANGE IN STATUS", however the documentation required in both cases is essentially the exact same documents (university degree, school information etc etc).
              Last edited by themoonrules; 2013-08-13, 04:27 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Public school jobs for foreigners are only ALTs, which means you get hired by a (scummy) dispatch agency or the JET program.
                Private school jobs can be either ALT or direct hire (unlikely on the latter, though).
                Eikaiwa is indeed probably your best bet. Not a lot of career advancement there, though.

                Instructor visa is needed to be an ALT.
                Humanities visa is needed to work in an eikaiwa.
                You can work in both, but you need special permission (not hard to get).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Not all public schools have ALTs that are dispatched through ALT companies, there are some (though not many) that do direct hire ALTs.

                  Any case if you want to come to Japan your worry is not the type of status, but just getting hired in the first place. You need to get hired first before you get get a status to come to Japan.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for all your responses.

                    Yea, I've recently started looking for jobs. Just thought it would be waste of time applying for jobs that require sponsorship eligibility if I weren't eligible in the first place ^.^

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