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How does a CELTA stack up for university jobs?

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  • How does a CELTA stack up for university jobs?

    I have been reading around on the forums about CETLA. I was wondering how a CELTA stacks up as a qualification for university jobs?

    Thanks

  • #2
    gI canft imagine what we would do without CETLA. Thank you for helping us become world class professors.h

    http://www.howard.edu/capstone/dec2008/feature2.html

    IF you were looking to teach at Howard University....

    CELTA is not worth deek.

    Comment


    • #3
      Depending on what you mean by university jobs, and I assume you mean university level eikaiwa type gigs, at this late stage of the game, I would say about as much as my CSIA Level 3 ticket, and that expired about 10 years ago.

      Unless you mean in conjunction with proper academic credentials considered appropriate for university jobs. In which case, sure, it might add a touch of pepper and spice to your application.

      It sounds like you're looking for the easiest route to secure a university job. If that be true, the easiest secure route is to get a PhD. 5 years from now the amount of university eikaiwa types with a decent PhD will pretty much make it a minimum credential, though hopefully some of the Old Rhinos like Ken44 and that will still be able to scratch out a forage.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by well_bicyclically View Post
        gI canft imagine what we would do without CETLA. Thank you for helping us become world class professors.h

        http://www.howard.edu/capstone/dec2008/feature2.html

        IF you were looking to teach at Howard University....

        CELTA is not worth deek.

        Yes and no. A bit of the ol' oversimplification again.

        I've known uni teachers with years under their belt who didn't have a clue how to make a lesson plan. And I don't just mean write the thing, but to understand that a lesson plan is a reflection of the way you intend a class to go. CELTA will at least give you some experience and practice with this. Plus, as it entails classroom observation, if you're a newbie it will give you a bit of confidence before the main performance. Also, it DOES give you some idea at least of how to shape a lesson and indeed to understand that a lesson should have a shape (as opposed to 90% of univ teachers whose only shape is the next unit in the textbook).

        The downside is that most of what CELTA teaches works like sh!ite here in Japan. But at least you'll have hopefully learned how to be wonderfully eclectic and adapt to all circumstances.

        Finally, it's mostly those teachers in Japan who taught out the back of their assses for years (i.e. with not a clue) before getting an MA or PhD who decry respectable qualification like CELTA/DELTA and Trinity.

        If I was hiring, CELTA/DELTA/Trinity would be a huge plus to me..

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by HarryHurry View Post
          ....

          If I was hiring, CELTA/DELTA/Trinity would be a huge plus to me..
          I put that in the same likelihood as "If I became near fluent in 6 languages,..." or "If I had the keys to the liquor storage,...."

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          • #6
            I wrote a post about what you need to get a uni job on my blog. Feel free to take a look and compare that with other people's advice.
            http://ilovekoto.blogspot.jp/2013/09...-position.html

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            • #7
              I read it. It is quite accurate. You could refine a bit:
              1) Solid knowledge of Japanese is an absolute must.
              2) Membership in professional organisations helps.
              3) An eikaiwa background can be detrimental more often than one might think.
              4) Have a specific research interest and publish in that area.

              And, for you, please do not call yourself a "university teacher." Use your title (lecturer, assistant prof, associate prof).

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Super Grover View Post
                I read it. It is quite accurate. You could refine a bit:
                1) Solid knowledge of Japanese is an absolute must.
                2) Membership in professional organisations helps.
                3) An eikaiwa background can be detrimental more often than one might think.
                4) Have a specific research interest and publish in that area.

                And, for you, please do not call yourself a "university teacher." Use your title (lecturer, assistant prof, associate prof).
                Thank you for your kind advice. I will make some additions probably tomorrow since I don't have time today. Cheers!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kaylarr View Post
                  Thank you for your kind advice. I will make some additions probably tomorrow since I don't have time today. Cheers!
                  Your blog does a good job of explaining what it is like to go through the application and hiring process at universities. I agree with much of what you've written there.

                  Glenski,

                  Here's another person that got a university teaching position with just a B.A. degree!

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