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Checking a students level

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  • Checking a students level

    So I FINALLY scored a new private student. She wants to learn Italian and told me before we met that she is only a beginner, to which I later found out that she already knows how to speak a little Italian. So I would like to know how do you guys measure new students? Do you have a test you hand out? I have no idea where to start in the middle. Im fine at beginners class, make my own material.

  • #2
    Originally posted by wernst View Post
    ... So I would like to know how do you guys measure new students?....
    use a metric measurement... not a yard stick. and make sure you have them take their shoes off.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by wernst View Post
      So I FINALLY scored a new private student. She wants to learn Italian and told me before we met that she is only a beginner, to which I later found out that she already knows how to speak a little Italian. So I would like to know how do you guys measure new students? Do you have a test you hand out? I have no idea where to start in the middle. Im fine at beginners class, make my own material.
      She sounds like a 'false beginner' - someone who claims to be a beginner, but actually isn't. If it's a 1-on-1 class, that's not such a big issue, but when you try to put these people in a beginner's class, it can be a headache.

      Look online to see if you can find an Italian language test. That should give you something to work with to get an idea of where she is at.

      Comment


      • #4
        Have a look here for a pretty good specification of levels with good descripors:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_..._for_Languages

        Commercially available materials will be mapped to this system. She may also be a false beginner - that normally refers to someone who presents as a beginner but who has significant amounts of passive rather than active knowledge.

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        • #5
          I love it when teachers come on GP to ask how to teach...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by HarryHurry View Post
            I love it when teachers come on GP to ask how to teach...
            Wernst isn't a teacher. He's an IT guy who wants to do some teaching on the side - and good luck to him I say.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Brown Cow View Post
              Wernst isn't a teacher. He's an IT guy who wants to do some teaching on the side - and good luck to him I say.
              Ah, right, you got me. My apologies Wernst.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by wernst View Post
                So I FINALLY scored a new private student. She wants to learn Italian and told me before we met that she is only a beginner, to which I later found out that she already knows how to speak a little Italian. So I would like to know how do you guys measure new students? Do you have a test you hand out? I have no idea where to start in the middle. Im fine at beginners class, make my own material.
                I guess you found out she speaks a little Italian by talking with her. This is what I usually do. Start with a conversation in the target language, varying the grammar and tenses. After a little bit you should be able to tell if she speaks only in short sentences, has good vocabulary but can't put it together properly, etc. I usually off at a slightly lower level than I put the student in order not to overwhelm him/her, or just in case I messed up.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wernst View Post
                  So I FINALLY scored a new private student. She wants to learn Italian and told me before we met that she is only a beginner, to which I later found out that she already knows how to speak a little Italian. So I would like to know how do you guys measure new students? Do you have a test you hand out? I have no idea where to start in the middle. Im fine at beginners class, make my own material.
                  Do you speak Italian? Because if you don't that could be kind of a problem

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ume View Post
                    Do you speak Italian? Because if you don't that could be kind of a problem
                    I use a mix of French and Spanish, Japanese students wouldn't be able to tell the difference :P

                    Originally posted by Mr. Ludd View Post
                    I guess you found out she speaks a little Italian by talking with her. This is what I usually do. Start with a conversation in the target language, varying the grammar and tenses. After a little bit you should be able to tell if she speaks only in short sentences, has good vocabulary but can't put it together properly, etc. I usually off at a slightly lower level than I put the student in order not to overwhelm him/her, or just in case I messed up.
                    Good tip, lots of info here. Thanks

                    Originally posted by HarryHurry View Post
                    Ah, right, you got me. My apologies Wernst.
                    No worries, I understand what you meant

                    Originally posted by Esoteric View Post
                    She sounds like a 'false beginner' - someone who claims to be a beginner, but actually isn't. If it's a 1-on-1 class, that's not such a big issue, but when you try to put these people in a beginner's class, it can be a headache.

                    Look online to see if you can find an Italian language test. That should give you something to work with to get an idea of where she is at.
                    Imagine my surprise, yeah its a 1 on 1 class. Thanks didnt even think about that.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by wernst View Post
                      So I would like to know how do you guys measure new students?
                      Wernst, here's what I do in four, count 'em, four easy steps:

                      (1) Pull out your dip stick and wipe it off on a clean, lint-free rag.

                      Be sure her engine is cold (or has been off for at least ten minutes) before you check it. The location of your dipstick depends on whether she has an in-line engine (rear-wheel drive).


                      (2) Insert your stick back into the pipe.

                      If your dipstick gets stuck on the way in, turn it around. The pipe it fits into is curved, and the stick bends naturally in the direction of the curve if you put it back in the way it came out.


                      (3) Pull the dipstick out again and look at the film of oil on the end of the stick.

                      Note how high the oil film reaches on the dipstick and the condition of the oil, and add or change the oil as needed.
                      You don't add oil into the tiny tube that the dipstick sits in; that's just asking for messy frustration. Look for a screw-off cap on top of the largest part of her engine. It could be blank or it could be labeled "Oil Cap" or something similar, and it might even indicate which grade of oil you ought to be using in your student. Unscrew that cap and add oil as needed.


                      (4) Put the dipstick back into the pipe. Youfre done!

                      Oil turns black pretty quickly, but that doesnft affect the quality. Rub a little between your thumb and index finger, and if it leaves a dirty smudge, it probably needs to be changed.



                      And there you have it!!!
                      Please keep in mind, that how much mileage you get from each student may vary.



                      **Disclaimer**
                      Some of the above information may or may not have been copied from here:
                      http://www.dummies.com/how-to/conten...oil-level.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Old Style View Post
                        Wernst, here's what I do in four, count 'em, four easy steps:

                        (1) Pull out your dip stick and wipe it off on a clean, lint-free rag.

                        Be sure her engine is cold (or has been off for at least ten minutes) before you check it. The location of your dipstick depends on whether she has an in-line engine (rear-wheel drive).


                        (2) Insert your stick back into the pipe.

                        If your dipstick gets stuck on the way in, turn it around. The pipe it fits into is curved, and the stick bends naturally in the direction of the curve if you put it back in the way it came out.


                        (3) Pull the dipstick out again and look at the film of oil on the end of the stick.

                        Note how high the oil film reaches on the dipstick and the condition of the oil, and add or change the oil as needed.
                        You don't add oil into the tiny tube that the dipstick sits in; that's just asking for messy frustration. Look for a screw-off cap on top of the largest part of her engine. It could be blank or it could be labeled "Oil Cap" or something similar, and it might even indicate which grade of oil you ought to be using in your student. Unscrew that cap and add oil as needed.


                        (4) Put the dipstick back into the pipe. Youfre done!

                        Oil turns black pretty quickly, but that doesnft affect the quality. Rub a little between your thumb and index finger, and if it leaves a dirty smudge, it probably needs to be changed.



                        And there you have it!!!
                        Please keep in mind, that how much mileage you get from each student may vary.



                        **Disclaimer**
                        Some of the above information may or may not have been copied from here:
                        http://www.dummies.com/how-to/conten...oil-level.html
                        Even if partially copied, you have WAAAAAAAY too much time on your hands old man.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mr. Ludd View Post
                          I guess you found out she speaks a little Italian by talking with her. This is what I usually do. Start with a conversation in the target language, varying the grammar and tenses. After a little bit you should be able to tell if she speaks only in short sentences, has good vocabulary but can't put it together properly, etc. I usually off at a slightly lower level than I put the student in order not to overwhelm him/her, or just in case I messed up.
                          What he said.

                          Also I usually ask the student what they want to focus on, or what they think their weakest points are. Things like grammatical issues and vocabulary can either be addressed with a textbook or through focused conversation. It's important to find out what kind of learning style your student is most comfortable with if you want to keep them long term. Sometimes they have their own materials that they want to use, which saves you time and money on prep. Ideally, you also want to know how much time they have to dedicate to the learning the language a week. Housewives who have more study time on their hands are generally going to progress faster and can handle more homework than a businessman who works a full day plus overtime, and you'll need to adjust goals for them accordingly.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wernst View Post
                            Even if partially copied, you have WAAAAAAAY too much time on your hands old man.
                            I'm sorry.

                            But oils well that ends well, eh?

                            Comment

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