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If it is illegal in Japan to advertise jobs that specify a gender ...

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  • If it is illegal in Japan to advertise jobs that specify a gender ...

    and I see an ad from a company doing exactly that, who do I report them to and what action can I expect to be taken against the offending company?

  • #2
    Umm No it is not. You can't report them to anybody and you can expect no action. Why would you want to? Were you school prefect? HTH

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    • #3
      I am sure they also specify an age limit as well... the sexual orientation is implied... and Buddha help the applicant who is not fair of face... or cannot make tea well...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by well_bicyclically View Post
        I am sure they also specify an age limit as well... the sexual orientation is implied... and Buddha help the applicant who is not fair of face... or cannot make tea well...
        and ask for a photo so they can screen you out if your ugly.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by well_bicyclically View Post
          I am sure they also specify an age limit as well... the sexual orientation is implied... and Buddha help the applicant who is not fair of face... or cannot make tea well...
          Remember when the ladies were required to supply their measurements as well?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 不良外人 View Post
            Umm No it is not. You can't report them to anybody and you can expect no action.
            You sure about that? I've seen several sources saying it was illegal in Japan to advertise jobs based on gender (outside of a few very limited fields, such as a professional sports team). One example is the O-Hayo Sensei FAQ which I copy pasted most of my thread title from.

            There seems to a rule against gender-discrimination in Japan in Article 14 of the Japanese Constitution, which says "All of the people are equal under the law and there shall be no discrimination in political, economic or social relations because of race, creed, sex, social status or family origin."

            And then there is the Equal Employment Opportunity Law, which was enacted in 1985. While the original version of the law did not force employers to have equal treatment in recruitment and hiring there was an amendment in 1997 to guarantee women equal treatment (in recruitment and hiring). In 2006 there was another amendment to this law which changed the wording to apply to men as well.

            I don't pretend to know that much about Japanese law though, does the Equal Employment Opportunity Law not apply to teaching jobs?

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            • #7
              35 years in Japanese relations, 25 years in Japan, 20 years runnning a corporation in Japan but, yeah you are right, I will bow to O-Hayo Sensei's FAQ superior knowledge.

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              • #8
                Japan is very backwards with this kind of stuff.

                Before getting married, my wife was offered a new job. She went to about 3/4 interviews at the same company, and was pretty much already working there by the time of the 4th interview. Then during interview number 4 they asked her if she had any plans to marry and she said that she did, so they withdrew their offer. Just like that. All because she was planned on getting married!

                It's crazy what kind of deeply personal questions they can ask potential employees in Japan without an legal repercussions. They can ask about illnesses, marriage intentions, having kids etc.

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                • #9
                  Legally, companies can't specify gender in job ads unless it relates to the job, but there are some (weird and broad) exceptions.

                  But gender discrimination law is comparatively toothless in Japan (legally and socially).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 不良外人 View Post
                    Umm No it is not. You can't report them to anybody and you can expect no action. Why would you want to? Were you school prefect? HTH

                    Actually, it's probably (surely) more childish of you to suppose it's playground cool and righteous NOT to report an illegal or morally iffy activity...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mr. Ludd View Post
                      Remember when the ladies were required to supply their measurements as well?
                      How long ago was that?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Since1990 View Post
                        How long ago was that?
                        Last time I remember seeing that was in the early '80s. As Chuckle Guy mentioned, saying you are married, or planning on doing so can cost you your job. Mrs. Ludd kept her status to herself for many years because 'married people always quit'. Most moronic.

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                        • #13
                          Ah, the playground snitch, lining himself up for the school prefect's job.

                          Originally posted by HarryHurry View Post
                          Actually, it's probably (surely) more childish of you to suppose it's playground cool and righteous NOT to report an illegal or morally iffy activity...

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                          • #14
                            Yup. If the OP has actually been at the sharp end of that sort of thing, then sure, use all available resources and mechanisms. If it is actually a simple case of a job ad he saw and is now feeling the need to be a finger wagging foreigner, then STFU and pay attention to why you still work at an Eikaiwa you blobby white turd.

                            Unless one can prove material harm, there is no way in hades any of the various agencies would lift a finger, regardless of the word of the law.

                            BTW, they used to ask for measurements and full body photos until at least 1992. My ex used to rant and rave about that, with good reason, of course. She was a civil servant, and the civil service is definitely not supposed to allow those shenanigans. Towards the end of that they got really clever, and answered the charges of sexism by making the male applicants provide the same.

                            What a clever, dirty people.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 不良外人 View Post
                              Ah, the playground snitch, lining himself up for the school prefect's job.

                              Well, there ya go. As I said - childish....

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