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Looking for teaching job, several questions ...

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  • #16
    As everybody has said, almost no demand for German or Polish teachers except for very limited special situations and except for out in the countryside where they might not be able to find a native speaker, they will mostly take any native over a non-native any time. If you can perfectly mimic UK or US English without any German accent, that would increase your chances quite a bit, although country folk might not even notice the difference. You can probably eventually find enough work to survive but it will take maybe a couple of years or a lot of luck being just in the right place at the right time.

    There are some working in business without having Japanese but if the job requires interfacing with Japanese that means that somebody will be paying an interpreter as well as your own salary, so there has to be specialized need to interface with Europeans or Americans, eg a company like Mitsubishi-Daimler. I know some Europeans working for German accounting firms here - if they have any specific needs for climate change planning or preparedness audits, this would be a possible entry for you. However they are much more concerned with basic environment controls like audits for pollution and safety wrt handling chemicals, and also particularly for earthquake preparedness because another mega-quake is overdue along several fault lines in the Tokyo area. You should try to press very hard and network with any professional German contacts you have esp with any large corp or corp audit companies. It's a long shot, but we have provided interpretation for foreign health and safety auditors, for example. There don't seem to be many if any J. companies providing those services for example to foreign international corps who subcontract mfg to Japanese companies and enforce their intl standards with audits, eg Nike, etc. Of course most of the subcontract mfg is now in China rather than Japan. It's so hard to find anything that you should definitely start asking around to find out if you can what German companies are consulting in Japan and the kinds of people they need in case anybody is doing environmental audits that you could do or train for.

    There have got to be a few deep environment groups in Japan who could use your expertise, however they are unlikely to have much money to pay an expert to start with, and without corporate profits on the line, unlikely to need you bad enough to pay both you and an interpreter. I'm just saying that while there are perhaps some organizations, they are most likely poorly funded here in Japan. Best way to start looking for that too would be start questioning all your foreign contacts to see if anybody knows of anything going on in Japan.
    Last edited by kabunushi; 2013-09-16, 07:30 AM.

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    • #17
      nobody is going to hire you as an english teacher, probably... because everybody assumes you got the worst accent in the world ("i am in principle" also tells enough already) and also they cant really sell you... for the japanese it isimportant that you are a native speaker...
      i had one german coworker, who worked at three different language cafes, though... but only because his gf had connections (but that goes for quite a few people here)...

      you also dont qualify for a visa anyway... not as an english teacher...
      japanese also like experience (makes sense, doesnt it?), so working in climate would be your best shot...

      as a warning: i sent out close to 3000 rirekisho in the past 2,5 years here (and my japanese is not that bad)... and except for an internship (that ripped me off) and a project-based translating job, i couldnt find anything (skilled worker with more than 10 years of experience)...

      unless your gf (assuming she is japanese) can support you, i would say it is a little on the risky side... sure, no risk, no fun... but you are also 34... for japanese companies, that is okay if you got experience (which you have), but having no experience at that age is something they do not really understand (me neither^^)...

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ssj_jup81 View Post
        Well, for where I am, I know of English teachers who are from non-English countries, the Philippines mostly, but my replacement at my former job is from Turkey. So if you are still interested in the English teaching route, hopefully you'll land something.
        I'm sorry, but this sort of rosy attitude doesn't help as much as it should. What were the visa status situations of those people? That is, were they on spousal visas or work visas? How did they get them? Things like that are important for the OP.

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        • #19
          OP, if you are really good at English and want to start with a teaching job, and if your GF is a Japanese national, then get married ASAP, get the Spousal visa (which will not require years of education in English, etc.) and rather than loosing your time with applying with schools (which will give you none to slim chance of being hired), try to start teaching private lessons. On average, you will need 3 to 4 students daily to make your living, and, if you can add some German lessons, even better. Friend of mine is not a native speaker either, did this for 1 year and when became fluent in Japanese and got more connections, landed a job in his field.
          Last edited by Kiboo; 2013-09-16, 04:27 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Glenski View Post
            I'm sorry, but this sort of rosy attitude doesn't help as much as it should. What were the visa status situations of those people? That is, were they on spousal visas or work visas? How did they get them? Things like that are important for the OP.
            As far as I know, the women from the Philippines are married now, not sure what their situations were prior. The replacement from Turkey of mine was outside of Japan and was hired from overseas so the school provided the work visa.

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            • #21
              Thanks for all the answers. I am away traveling at the moment and will reply in more detail to individual posts once I have a fast Internet connection.

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              • #22
                Watch out, if u come back to Japan with ur j gf then u'll most likely find yourself married quite soon. So make sure u really really want to be tied (legally speaking) to ur current gf.

                Fetitch jobs sometimes has product testing / modeling work for Europeans (UK Australians NZ US Canada Africans...). The latest modeling work is looking for ten westerners for a television food drama program that would like to take photos while participants eat rice. Yeah i know it sounds weird. This kinda work comes in regularly. Cool thing is usually collecting between 10-50 ppl. So the probability of getting accepted is reasonable. Unlike recruiting where they throw out mostly fake ads disguised as job postings (u know if they are generic).

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                • #23
                  Say you are a native speaker and try to speak like John Wayne at every interview. Lay the cowboy accent on and hope it sticks. And be genki.

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                  • #24
                    Sorry, seems I missed to post a sarcastic remark :
                    So are mid-30s, have a master in science and six years of work experience and are giving up your career to work as an poorly-paid eikaiwa monkey in Japan, where you don't even speak the language ? And you do all this because of your girlfirend ?

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