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Questions Regarding Peppy Kids Club and iTTTi

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  • #16
    Originally posted by nikorasu View Post
    1. They do have a set curriculum to follow. However they encourage you to alter the lesson, so long as the core lesson remains the same. I feel I could start an English class of my own with little difficulty, but that depends more on the person.

    2. They do hire locals but for some reason prefer people outside of Japan. I'd say your chances are good if you are in Japan. Call the local office in your area directly and ask for the PS (personal supervisor). The PS (a gaijin) is in charge of the English teachers in his/her area. They seem to be more receptive to the idea of hiring locals than the head office. The offices can be hard to locate so you may need to do some investigating.

    3. A year is the minimum contract but you can quit early with no real repercussion as long as you give 3 months notice so they can replace you. After the first year you can re-up in contracts of 3, 6 and 12 months.

    4. The training was ok. Kind of short for the amount of information you had to learn but it was acceptable. The worst part of training was long days. You train about 10 hours a day for 2 weeks. That plus commuting made it 12 some days. Once you get to you final schools the time is much shorter. Supervision is done by your PS. They have a review about every 3 months where they watch one class and grade you. They do parent observations twice a year where parents watch the class. At first the routine can be stressful, but it fades quick then it comes down to your personality whether you'll have fun or not. I had a good enough time. Kids are kids, some are great, others are a pain. Most of my students were great.

    5. They want off the charts genki which is hard. Basically though, after training you can play it by ear. The young kids like the genki style, the older kids look at you like your crazy. For young classes your expected to learn songs and dances.

    6. Classes last an hour and there is 15 minutes between each to see the kids off and prepare for the next class. Weeknights have up to 4 classes (avg of 2-3). Weekends have between 0-8 classes (avg 4-5). It was in my experience some of the lowest hours of any school I saw. You teach at 3-4 schools, one week at each school in a month, rotating from school to school. The 3 weeks that you're not at a school, a Japanese teacher teaches the students. Some schools have lots of class other very few. 2 of my schools were packed. 2 were fairly empty. Sometimes commuting can take a lot of time. My schools were close but my coworkers had schools as far as an 1.5 hours away. Normally only one school is far off and the others are close, they try to be fair. Commuting costs are all covered by the company.


    Overall I enjoyed it. I'd suggest the school to others and would return if I didn't want to continue my career of choice.
    Hello Nicholas,

    I just got a job offer from PKC. I'm going to be starting in late September. I was wondering, could you please go into more detail about what goes on during the training period. Like, what is the exam at the end of the training like? What are the contents?

    Also, I'm curious, where was your placement? Was your apartment the standard 1k?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by dragonking View Post
      Hello Nicholas,

      I just got a job offer from PKC. I'm going to be starting in late September. I was wondering, could you please go into more detail about what goes on during the training period. Like, what is the exam at the end of the training like? What are the contents?

      Also, I'm curious, where was your placement? Was your apartment the standard 1k?
      The training period is pretty intense. It lasts 2 weeks with only Sundays off and is about 8 hours. There will also be studying the material and commuting outside of that. The material isn't to bad to learn, just memorizing lesson formats, songs and dances for the younger classes, and administrative stuff like tracking lesson/student progress. It left me tired, partly cause it was my first time in Japan and I wanted to explore and hang out with the others in training. This coupled with the fact I had left from the US and was shifting my hours forward by 13 left me wiped. My recommendation would be arrive a few days early and rest up then. The exam is a pretty much all multiple choice and short answer. They'll tell you what you need to know, just take notes and read the material they give you and you should be fine. It does require a minimum score to get the job, but like I said if you do as the reading and listen it should be easy. They give you a second attempt if you fail, I think, but everyone in my group passed it first try.

      My placement was in Kanazawa Ishikawa. It was nice and the people there were great especially my Person Supervisor who helped me get settled in and set up. The others Teachers in the area also helped me out by showing me around. When in doubt ask them for help. Peppy also has a teacher support number you can call if your in a bind. I had to call once when I got the wrong train and ended up almost missing my class. You can request cities to be placed in but whether or not you get them depends on if there's an opening there. I just asked for a bigger city and I got it.

      Apartments will vary in Peppy. In some cities they're spread miles apart and in some cities they're all in the same building. The size and age also varies. Generally speaking, they'll be 1k, have a western toilet (you want this) and be fairly close to a train station. Most are kept in a reasonable state and I didn't know of anyone with complaints. If they let you know where your going to be early, like they did me you can see if they're willing to give you the email of the current teacher living there and see if they'd be willing to leave you whatever furniture/dishware/etc they bought. Company policy was to toss extras out unless otherwise requested by the teachers. I emailed my replacement and left them my couch, a drawer/end-table and offered my western style bed, though she didn't take it, so i ended up giving it away to another teacher.

      Anything else I can help with ask away or pm me.

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      • #18
        Hi Nicholas! I have an upcoming interview with PKC. Could you please share some interview questions they've asked you? what did you bring for the interview? this is will be my first time for an in-person interview, i have no idea what to expect. thanks so much in advance!

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