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Effect of New Part-Time Labor Law on English Teachers

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  • Effect of New Part-Time Labor Law on English Teachers

    I wonder if the newly passed Part-Time Labor Law is going to have any effect on the "English Language Industry"......

    Will those that employ people on a part-time basis keep them for four years and then give them the boot before the fifth anniversary of employment rolls around?

  • #2
    Aren't Japanese universities already doing this with foreign English instructors? 3 years max. and then they are let go or renewed for another 3 years.

    Maybe someone who has been involved with the union can clarify this for us: What is the key number of years where an employer has to decide whether to fire or offer an employee a permanent position? There must be a reason why most universities offer 3 year contracts to English teachers and I'm guessing that this is the reason - they don't want to have to offer the gaijin English teacher a permanent job.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by *** View Post
      Aren't Japanese universities already doing this with foreign English instructors? 3 years max. and then they are let go or renewed for another 3 years.

      Maybe someone who has been involved with the union can clarify this for us: What is the key number of years where an employer has to decide whether to fire or offer an employee a permanent position? There must be a reason why most universities offer 3 year contracts to English teachers and I'm guessing that this is the reason - they don't want to have to offer the gaijin English teacher a permanent job.
      I think that you must be talking about the number of years for renewal of contracts.

      The new law is specifically aimed at part-time work and workers.

      When I was in Japan I taught at one university on an adjunt basis for 6 years and at another for 5 years. In both cases I left as I moved overseas. At another I told them to 'stick it' after four years.............

      So unless laws have changed or they were breaking the law I doubt that there was any such law in regards to part-time workers.............

      There is now and it will come into in 5 years.............

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      • #4
        Originally posted by yankee01 View Post
        There is now and it will come into in 5 years.............
        Okay.

        But what does the above mean?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by *** View Post
          Okay.

          But what does the above mean?
          Left out the word "effect".

          Comes into effect in five years.

          Here is an English language article about the law:

          http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20120804b4.html

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          • #6
            Originally posted by yankee01 View Post
            Left out the word "effect".

            Comes into effect in five years.

            Here is an English language article about the law:

            http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20120804b4.html


            I can't see anything in there that will protect gaijin employees.

            Comment


            • #7
              Not a heckuva lot of information in that news story. It's not just for PT workers, either.

              Diet revises labor contract law
              Kyodo

              The Diet on Friday revised the labor contract law to improve employers' treatment of contract workers hired for fixed durations and to ban their unreasonable dismissal.

              The revised law gives the nation's estimated 12 million part-time or contract workers the option of becoming permanent staff after five years' employment at the same workplace.

              The amendment also prohibits employers from refusing to renew such contracts when it is deemed reasonable for workers to expect to be retained. The revised law further outlaws "unreasonable" differences in the working conditions of contract and permanent employees.

              A separate act, the Labor Standards Law, limits the term of a single contract to three years in principle, but employers often renew them repeatedly in practice.
              Now, you are supposed to be taken in as FT after 3 years, but this new law stretches it to a 5-year wait. Lovely. Helps the dispatch agencies, not the teachers or schools.

              So, "unreasonable" differences are outlawed. Good. What were they, and who will really police that? Same with "unreasonable dismissal".

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by yankee01 View Post
                I wonder if the newly passed Part-Time Labor Law is going to have any effect on the "English Language Industry"......

                Will those that employ people on a part-time basis keep them for four years and then give them the boot before the fifth anniversary of employment rolls around?
                The J Government must be laughing their butts off reading this post!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by pack105
                  What they do is, at the end of your 1 year contract they don't let it just end, they fire the drones. They don't tell them that, the just send them a work seperation certificate without explanation later. They then offer a new contract to them as a new employee. So, the drone is not recontracted, he is a new employee.
                  My p/t contracts are valid from April 1st through March 31st the following year.

                  Then I am offered a new one

                  I have never recieved a work seperation certificate

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Can't say I've ever heard of that either. And I suspect that it wouldn't be legal.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ken44 View Post
                      My p/t contracts are valid from April 1st through March 31st the following year.
                      Then I am offered a new one
                      I have never recieved a work seperation certificate
                      Have to agree with "Ken44",

                      in my case it has been quite some years now, 1-year-contracts - renewed every April.
                      Am I happy with this - hell NO! After all this time still a "freshman" *_*.
                      Can I change it - well I'll be waiting for answers.
                      Am I happy with my job - for sure YES.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        So what actually is this new law supposed to mean?

                        I have taught 2 classes once a week for ten years at a J-university.

                        Does this mean (in theory) I should be made full-time?

                        Of course I'm not going to suggest such nonsense.

                        However, given the knee jerk reaction of the Japanese I wonder if this law will affect me?

                        I recall when the union demanded that teachers working more than 6 classes a week be given benefits many schools cut the number of classes offer to get around any potential problems.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by pack105
                          Then you must not work for the company that cannot be named.
                          Their contracts begin at 8:15 on the first day you go to work in April, and you are fired at 5pm on the last day of school in March.
                          Probably because

                          1. they lose the contract in the next year and there is no job for you to go back to even if they wanted to.
                          2. They can only hire you a maximum of three years at a client company before they are required to hire you full time. Company will rather let you go than let you go and work at their client.
                          3. Your contract is for one year, they are under no obligation to keep hiring you.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by pack105
                            1. They know how long they have the contract for with a BoE. Be it for the next three years or less. So they could offer you a 2 year contract.
                            2. Haha, that's why they fire you each year.
                            3. Well durr.
                            Well Im only guessing, some schools want to change their teachers every year, have a new face in there, and what the schools want the schools get. BOE will ask to send a new teacher even if it means firing the old one.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by pack105
                              1. They know how long they have the contract for with a BoE. Be it for the next three years or less. So they could offer you a 2 year contract.
                              2. Haha, that's why they fire you each year.
                              3. Well durr.

                              When will ALT's learn the BoE and many schools are HAPPY with the way things are.

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