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What do you think of these ads for full-time ALT's paying 200,000-230,000 yen/month?

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  • What do you think of these ads for full-time ALT's paying 200,000-230,000 yen/month?

    If you came over to Japan on the JET Programme, even now, you would be paid 100,000 more yen per month plus countless benefits on top of that. It's the same job.

    I thought the bottom was 250,000, but I'm seeing companies advertise these positions for as low as 200,000.

    Why so little money for a full-time job that requires so much dedication?

    I guess schools must now be taking people who snuck into the country, lied about their education, and have English as their second language. Either that, or they're taking bored spouses who don't need to earn a living, who have come over with their husband or wife who's already making enough money.

    Woops. Maybe I shouldn't have said that. Now those recruiting companies can start targeting those groups more.

  • #2
    Cities (BOEs) are getting stingy with the amount of money they are willing to spend. They've all had budget cuts etc and sometimes these cuts have been compounded by experiences with dodgy dispatch providers and lousy ALTs. Contracts go to the lowest bidder because the city it seems has to provide this service. One way they get to do this is by not paying out the long vacation periods and do a pro rata payment. 200,000-230,000 is basically 10 months pay. The upside is that you have a ton of time off and the more motivated just go out and get summer jobs.

    That said, if in some circumstances this is the pay after shakai hoken has been taken out then IMO it is not so bad. If, however, shakai hoken is taken out after 200,000 - f.V.ckk that noise.

    It's really a matter of what the market is willing to pay for what are generally inexperienced and under qualified goofballs.

    Meanwhile, one thing I have noticed is that a lot more schools and BOEs are actually going down the direct contract route and hiring qualified instructors (even if they only in practice functions as ALTs) at 300,000-350,000+/month. The thing is that many of these calls for teachers go out in Japanese and don't appear on places like gaijinpot thus eliminating 90% of the chaff. You have to really look for them and then if you don't have references and teaching certification or a masters you won't find this work.
    Last edited by 6810; 2012-10-14, 08:18 AM. Reason: Expletive got blanked: fixed

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    • #3
      There are even lower salaries out there. I've seen them for 170,000-180,000. They exist because desperate people are willing to take them, and companies want to save money.

      Oh, the JET programme will probably not be offering 100,000 more than what you've seen in the next year or so. Salaries there are rumored to be cut.

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      • #4
        They are only hiring pirates now, it seems.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 6810 View Post
          ....It's really a matter of what the market is willing to pay for what are generally inexperienced and under qualified goofballs.
          I know that`s what many like to tell themselves but I doubt that`s the case. Plenty of experienced teachers with a good track record are having to bite the bullet and take jobs they wouldn`t have looked at twice ten years ago. What do you think happens to some gaijins uni. teachers after reaching the age of 67 and the J-universities let them go?

          It`s often back to 3500 yen an hour teaching companies classes.

          Now the only reason gaijins like myself who teach at J-universities haven`t been hit too hard is because my salary (by law) has to be on par with J-teachers who also work p/t.
          Still almost every year it`s a scramble to fill holes in my schedule.

          A while back someone wrote my "shelf life" as a uni teacher was about up and that`s true. I`ve got a good few years left before universities begin thinking twice about hiring someone age 60 but hopefully I will be alright financially so it won`t matter too much.

          You want to teach English in Japan as a career?

          O.k but you either get it together or you get the ____ out.
          Last edited by Ken44; 2012-10-14, 10:11 AM.

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          • #6
            If you get to 60, 67 and haven't figured out the next stage etc then what on earth have you been doing. Not you personally, just saying, in principal. Why on earth wouldn't you have a contingency plan for post 60? If you'd been that long in Japan why hadn't you received better qualifications, lisences etc?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 6810 View Post
              If you get to 60, 67 and haven't figured out the next stage etc then what on earth have you been doing. Not you personally, just saying, in principal. Why on earth wouldn't you have a contingency plan for post 60? If you'd been that long in Japan why hadn't you received better qualifications, lisences etc?


              You`d be surprised at the number of long-term gaijins (or maybe not) who have almost nothing in place as far as a retirement plan goes.

              In fact it`s pretty much taboo to even bring up the subject because what`s the point?

              It`s going to be teach until you drop dead and believe me there are gaijins who do just that.

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              • #8
                Anything less than 250,000 is a joke and not worth your time. 250,000 is really not alot in Japan and you are going to need double that just to get rolling and to hold off until the first paycheck. Any company offering that little should signal a red flag, as a company that pays garbage, will treat you like garbage.

                We are not far away from places offering "competitve salaries" of 150,000 a month. Sadly people either can't get over their japan addiction or can't afford to get out and it's only going to get worse.

                I know one of my good friends is surely one of thse gaijins with nothing planned longterm. I try to hint to him that he should save more and spend less, but he's having too much buying video games and going to idol crap.
                Last edited by nogimmickneeded4; 2012-10-14, 11:19 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 6810 View Post
                  If you get to 60, 67 and haven't figured out the next stage etc then what on earth have you been doing. Not you personally, just saying, in principal. Why on earth wouldn't you have a contingency plan for post 60? If you'd been that long in Japan why hadn't you received better qualifications, lisences etc?
                  On the other hand, how can you get to that age and not have learnt that life is unpredictable and that plans don't always help?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Shinjilalenai View Post
                    On the other hand, how can you get to that age and not have learnt that life is unpredictable and that plans don't always help?
                    Agreed. People decry the National Pension Scheme, but it's a start. Then you need more - much more, in a proper plan, getting tax relief, growing for the future. Don't teach until you die. Teach to give yourself a comfortable future. Aim to put away AT LEAST 25% of your salary. Then, when you're ready - 60, 65, 70... - sit back and enjoy. But don't - now - understimate how much you need to put aside.

                    Think you can't afford it? Question: can you afford not to? Poverty in old age in Japan, or any country, is most unpleasant.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ksnasi lurker View Post
                      Question: can you afford not to? Poverty in old age in Japan, or any country, is most unpleasant.
                      I don't know about that... I couple of One-Cups, a pack of ___s, and tons of pretty girls in short skirts walking by...

                      Being old in Japan doesn't sound too bad to me...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Call_It_Like_Eye_See_It View Post
                        I don't know about that... I couple of One-Cups, a pack of ___s, and tons of pretty girls in short skirts walking by...

                        Being old in Japan doesn't sound too bad to me...
                        Yeah, but if you also have money you don't just have to look at the girls....

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Call_It_Like_Eye_See_It View Post
                          I don't know about that... I couple of One-Cups, a pack of ___s, and tons of pretty girls in short skirts walking by...

                          Being old in Japan doesn't sound too bad to me...
                          That sounds like something someone young would say, not someone old. One Cup will just give you a headache and the vacuous girls just leave you fearing for humanity.

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                          • #14
                            I don't think the norm has ever been 285 since I've been here. 250 was the average when I came, and it seems only to have gone down. I don't see it booming again unless the economy picks up, and I don't see the economy picking up anytime soon.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Chalky
                              The real questions is;
                              Will the salaries improve or not?
                              Are we going to see 200,000 a month as a norm?


                              Yeah, I`d say around 200,000 is the norm for many these days and if anything it`ll continue to slide.

                              200,000 yen a month is enough to pay the bills and beats washing dishes or digging a ditch like many non-teachers do to get by.

                              The fact that some gaijins insist a teaching career in Japan when it`s clearly not designed as such esp. in the lower ranks have no one to blame but themselves.
                              Last edited by Ken44; 2012-10-17, 03:36 PM.

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