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Career Progression from ALT or Eikaiwa

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Jed333 View Post
    Yes, thats just the very nature of the job! Thats not news. I think most people can see there is not structure to climb up. Its a teaching job (or assisting the REAL teachers?) end of story
    But compared to other countries, Japanese wages are certainly not the worst
    One idea is this- get part time/full time gig in Tokyo and then build up your own school. I stayed in a Sakura House gaijin house, the room was ten tatamis in size. It was in an expensive part of central Tokyo near people with money and very few other language schools. I used curtains and sectioned off part of my room (big enough for a class room). I used an advertising fold up thingee on the street, like the restaurants use. I scanned another schools flyer (professional looking) and then put them on the fold up thing in the street with my schools details etc. After a few months I had five students and they were regular.

    I had to leave Japan so never continued this programme, but believe it would have grown and grown. I was charging 4000 yen for 75 mins. Of course if Sakura House had found out they would have stopped me, but they rarely came around to my small gaijin house and probably wouldn't have cottoned on to what I was up to for awhile. I think in this competitive world with crap conditions in language schools, thinking outside the box can work! I would do this while working elsewhere until you have built up good customers. Choose a good location; two benefits to this ;you get lots of wealthy customers and you can live in a good convenient location yourself near the station. If i go back to Japan I will do this while working elsewhere. The Japanese girls who were my customers never realized my bed and clothes were just feet away behind the curtains. I think in business a certain amount of deception is needed.

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    • #17
      Second that its a great job but its not a career.
      Back home you get people working the same low wage jobs for decades with their pay only ever rising in tune with inflation, if it at all. ALTing certainly beats those jobs. But its really not the propegandised image of a graduate job that the older generation believes in. But then what is these days.
      You can stick at it for decades just fine, its decent pay, but there's no progression.

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      • #18
        Well there is some potential for advancement, if you're at one of the big eikaiwa schools you can move up to trainer and eventually DOS.

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        • #19
          As vallient says, there's room for progression in some eikaiwas. senior teacher --> ADos --> DoS --> training dept./materials/management.
          You need a bit of luck and timing, but it's quite doable and it's a path I've seen trodden several times over the years where I am.

          You can also, after a few years teaching, apply for better jobs: uni work or corporate stuff, for example, if that's what you want to get into. Or apply somewhere that'll pay you a fat salary for your time, like the Middle East. Not a bad progression if after 5 years teaching you can land a job paying $5000USD/month tax free....
          Last edited by caketaster; 2013-04-13, 11:53 AM.

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          • #20
            It's possible to transition into working at a university in Japan, but without a lot of luck, you need to follow certain steps to acheive this and those steps are not for the non-committed. Also, JET ALT positions aren't that hard and in fact, are usually very easy work for good pay. There may be some exceptions, but most JETs don't work most weekends, don't do much overtime, and don't have a ton of responsibilities in their jobs.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Kaylarr View Post
              It's possible to transition into working at a university in Japan, but without a lot of luck, you need to follow certain steps to acheive this and those steps are not for the non-committed. Also, JET ALT positions aren't that hard and in fact, are usually very easy work for good pay. There may be some exceptions, but most JETs don't work most weekends, don't do much overtime, and don't have a ton of responsibilities in their jobs.
              It's quite competitive to get a JET spot these days I hear. But yes, not hard work if you have any desire to teach. The pay is great. It was even better when I was a JET. I weep as I compare what I was making then and now. They even flew you over business class in those days. Can't call JET a career though. You can only be a JET for 3 years, with a limited amount of 5 year positions.

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