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Can Dual-citizens teach english without a bachelors degree?

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  • Can Dual-citizens teach english without a bachelors degree?

    I am a dual citizen of Japan and America. I am not 18 yet but I will be getting my two year degree in about a year from now. I wanted to know if it would be possible for me to get a teaching job without prior experience or a bachelors degree since I dont need a work visa. I have also considered moving there after my 18th birthday/graduation to find general employment before I persue teaching. My japanese skills is kind-of fluent, I understand it almost completely but my japanese is mostly conversational. I know that doesnt affect my teaching eligibility but I wanted to know how hard that would make finding general employment jobs like waitressing, receptionist etc.

  • #2
    Anything is possible! Kind of fluent Japanese language skill is more than a lot of other foreigners, so I would say you have better chances than a lot of foreigners! I would recommend finding out more about TESOL / TEFL teaching at a local community college / University, maybe even signing up for some courses and get a jump start, also look into maybe volunteer teaching. Also consider kids classes, as that is where the jobs tend to be, and where it should be easier to get your foot in the door!

    By the way most schools and teaching companies pay their Japanese teachers less per hour than they do their foreigners, so be sure to streets that you are American but you do not need sponsorship or a visa! The lack of a degree could be a problem but can be waived if they like what they see specially in the Jukus!

    Good luck
    Last edited by TheHotCondom; 2013-08-14, 11:29 PM.

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    • #3
      Yeah, it's possible, but very unlikely that a teenager (you will be 19 after you complete 2 more years of schooling) will be hired to teach in most situations. Look at the job ads for one. They almost always require a bachelor's degree. Juku might not care, but give your students a break, ok? Don't they deserve someone who has at least completed a four-year degree (or lived as long as someone who has)?

      And, a dual citizen who can't even claim full fluency in the language is pushing it, but academically and vocationally.

      Where did you want to teach anyway?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Glenski View Post
        Yeah, it's possible, but very unlikely that a teenager (you will be 19 after you complete 2 more years of schooling) will be hired to teach in most situations. Look at the job ads for one. They almost always require a bachelor's degree. Juku might not care, but give your students a break, ok? Don't they deserve someone who has at least completed a four-year degree (or lived as long as someone who has)?

        And, a dual citizen who can't even claim full fluency in the language is pushing it, but academically and vocationally.

        Where did you want to teach anyway?
        If i were to leave after obtaining a BA, I will be 20. I have checked out the job ads for awhile and the confusion I have had over them is what they want the bachelors for. as far as them "deserving" someone with a four year degree, the degree never has to be a teaching degree but it can be in any major so I am assuming the degree serves for experience and for foreigners to have their visa. someone in a different forum mentioined this so i thought i would throw it out there, If I teach english to preschoolers, is that considered more of a child care position? I also thought that most of the foreigners who teach in programs like JET are straight out of college, so only 2 years older than I am? you can correct me if I am wrong but I was hoping they were looking for young, western natives. If they do not want people with a two year degree then I suppose I would prefer to finish school in the states. im just very confused since everything seems fuzzy with what they actually want, plus my unique situation. I was hoping to teach anywhere from the midland to the north. Hyogoken would be nice.
        Last edited by saechan; 2013-08-15, 01:20 AM.

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        • #5
          Culturally are you mostly American? Mainly that means did you go to school from K-12 in the US or Japan? Also, do you look very Japanese? Looks are important in that people expect to pay more for foreign teachers and even some of my pure american Nisei friends told me that they had a bit of trouble not being white meaning that they were not thought to be authentic Americans. Also, people always expected them to speak very good Japanese.

          It's a drag being stereotyped on your looks, but there are tons of English schools out there and the school would not want to claim and charge more for native speakers and then end up with, regardless of the truth, some mothers looking and then whispering "is that girl American"? "No, she's Japanese, isn't she"? And this being Japan people are less likely to ask questions and more likely to just disappear and take their business elsewhere. Not saying that's good, just that this is a dynamic you should understand. But all things being equal, you certainly should not need a BA to keep kiddie English!!! Not needing a visa is great. As was said above you might be better off just saying that you are American but have a child-of-Japanese visa which gives you unrestricted permission to work. This is because the pay rates for Japanese eikawa teachers will definitely be lower than for American teachers.
          All in all it's hard to tell -- if you are in the right place at the right time you can definitely get a job but how hard do you have look to find that is the question which may be hard for us to answer.

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          • #6
            I'm a bit confused on your timing and age here. How can you get a bachelor's degree by age 20? For most Americans (is that your nationality), they graduate around 21 or 22.

            As for preschool English being mostly daycare, what do you think? Pre-school means 2 or 3 years old. They barely speak their home language, let alone know how to use the toilet. At that age, preschool facilities have one J teacher for a handful of kids because they are such a handful, and their attention span is short (like anyone that age). "Teaching" them English is not going to be anything approaching serious, just a lot of singing and dancing.

            If you want to rely on your dual citizenship, keep in mind that technically you have to choose one over the other by the time you're 22 (I think the decision itself needs to be made in your 21st year). Become a full J citizen then, and you will have to play by the rules set for all J citizens in getting a job. Keep your American (?) citizenship instead, and you'll need that bachelor's degree, yes, for the purposes of meeting immigration requirements for the visa.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by saechan View Post
              I am a dual citizen of Japan and America. I am not 18 yet but I will be getting my two year degree in about a year from now. I wanted to know if it would be possible for me to get a teaching job without prior experience or a bachelors degree since I dont need a work visa. I have also considered moving there after my 18th birthday/graduation to find general employment before I persue teaching. My japanese skills is kind-of fluent, I understand it almost completely but my japanese is mostly conversational. I know that doesnt affect my teaching eligibility but I wanted to know how hard that would make finding general employment jobs like waitressing, receptionist etc.
              What do you want to do ? Be a kindergarden teacher ? A waitress ? Work in a company ?
              Personally speaking, I'd think it would be a good idea to improve your Japanese and try out several jobs if you're not sure. But in any case, a formal education/training would be much better for your long-term prospects. Often, the 'degree' requirement is just for the visa. If you also have a J-passport, you could start on the spot, which would also be an advantage, or could work part-time with out visa sponsorship necessary.

              Comment


              • #8
                I agree with you completely, japan has always favored/unfavored me for my looks regarding almost anything. I have gone to school in japan for preschool/partial grade school and learned to speak english when I was 5 but now I have been completely cultured by america. My personality/looks is very gaijin. My body is very "curvy", commonly considered american figure. I am going off topic and too detailed I think but I see your point and hopefully my gender/looks put me in favor like some of my japanese family friends have mentioned. My face is considered asian in america but I always get looks of surprise when I speak japanese in Japan. So yes I guess i am pretty white in japan. thank you for your input!
                Last edited by saechan; 2013-08-15, 03:06 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Glenski View Post
                  I'm a bit confused on your timing and age here. How can you get a bachelor's degree by age 20? For most Americans (is that your nationality), they graduate around 21 or 22.

                  As for preschool English being mostly daycare, what do you think? Pre-school means 2 or 3 years old. They barely speak their home language, let alone know how to use the toilet. At that age, preschool facilities have one J teacher for a handful of kids because they are such a handful, and their attention span is short (like anyone that age). "Teaching" them English is not going to be anything approaching serious, just a lot of singing and dancing.

                  If you want to rely on your dual citizenship, keep in mind that technically you have to choose one over the other by the time you're 22 (I think the decision itself needs to be made in your 21st year). Become a full J citizen then, and you will have to play by the rules set for all J citizens in getting a job. Keep your American (?) citizenship instead, and you'll need that bachelor's degree, yes, for the purposes of meeting immigration requirements for the visa.
                  Im gonna be a little bit blunt here but I noticed that alot of these forums have rude, belittling commentors and you seem to be no different from them. As far as your confusion goes, my state offers a marvelous program for high school students who are not being challenged in public school classes to have the opportunity to attend community college for free, to persue a cheaper, quicker route to a BA. You must qualify for this and maintain good standing to graduate early as I did. So yes average americans graduate around that age but fortunately i will extra early.

                  For my question about preschool, you really could have just answered my question without getting oddly demeaning, thanks.

                  and you are also not understanding the term DUAL CITIZENSHIP. there is a loophole for biracial kids like me to keep both, because we consider ourselves both nationalities. Japanese government requires you to "try to forfeit US citizenship". they have no way to see if you have actually gotten rid of your us citizenship, especially since doing so is not easy for law abiding citizens. Therefore we have two passports, and two different addresses at all times. Therefore, not needing a visa which was the whole point of my question. if you cannot/do not understand the legality and complication to my situation please do not answer. thank you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you are a dual citizen, you will not need a visa. So you just need to find a company that is willing to hire someone who does not have a degree. Some are, some aren't.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Glenski View Post
                      If you want to rely on your dual citizenship, keep in mind that technically you have to choose one over the other by the time you're 22 (I think the decision itself needs to be made in your 21st year). Become a full J citizen then, and you will have to play by the rules set for all J citizens in getting a job. Keep your American (?) citizenship instead, and you'll need that bachelor's degree, yes, for the purposes of meeting immigration requirements for the visa.
                      Originally posted by saechan View Post
                      ..and you are also not understanding the term DUAL CITIZENSHIP. there is a loophole for biracial kids like me to keep both, because we consider ourselves both nationalities. Japanese government requires you to "try to forfeit US citizenship". they have no way to see if you have actually gotten rid of your us citizenship, especially since doing so is not easy for law abiding citizens. Therefore we have two passports, and two different addresses at all times. Therefore, not needing a visa which was the whole point of my question. if you cannot/do not understand the legality and complication to my situation please do not answer. thank you.
                      As far as I know, neither the US nor Japan allows for dual citizenship do they?
                      If you know of something other than that, please post a link because I'm highly interested in reading that.

                      Glenski used the word "technically" because he wasn't telling you what people actually do, he was quoting fact, as far as I know.
                      Would you rather he post illegal advice?
                      If I misunderstood Glenski's quote, that's my mistake by the way, not his.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I see that this thread has been gutted of a lot of comments. Good.

                        saechan,
                        My remarks were not meant to be belittling or demeaning, so you have totally misread them. If you are that sensitive or have that predisposition to comments on an anonymous discussion forum, I suggest that you try to read posts more carefully for the actual message content they deliver. Besides, living here as an expat (with or without dual citizenship), you will have to develop a thicker skin anyway.

                        Let's get back on track.

                        You are going to be on the very lowest rung of the ladder age-wise, so getting any sort of teaching job will be slightly problematic, even with your dual citizenship, IMO. Also, people will be just as confused as I was about how you could manage to get a bachelor's degree so young, so you should be prepared to explain that in all initial cover letters.

                        As for dual citizenship, I suggest you read about it. I have. There are those who hide it just so they can keep it, and that in itself should be an indicator of how poorly Japan treats such situations. (Old Style is correct in how I tried to phrase it earlier.) I personally know people who hide it, as well as at least one individual who was forced to renounce it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Saechan, whatever you do, please be careful. I still feel that this is a very grey area and what works for some people, may or may not work for others.

                          Have a look here:

                          Current U.S. Law and Policy

                          United States law does not contain any provisions requiring U.S. Citizens who are born with dual nationality or who acquire a second nationality at an early age to choose one nationality or the other when they become adults (see Mandoli v. Acheson, 344 U.S. 133 [1952] ). The current nationality laws of the United States do not specifically refer to dual nationality.

                          While recognizing the existence of dual nationality and permitting Americans to have other nationalities, the U.S. Government does not endorse dual nationality as a matter of policy because of the problems which it may cause. Claims of other countries upon dual-national U.S. Citizens often place them in situations where their obligations to one country are in conflict with the laws of the other.

                          In addition, their dual nationality may hamper efforts to provide diplomatic and consular protection to them while they are abroad. It generally is considered that while a dual national is in the other country of which the person is a citizen, that country has a predominant claim on the person. In cases where a dual national encounters difficulty in a foreign country of which the person is a citizen, the ability of the U.S. Government to provide assistance may be quite limited since many foreign countries may not recognize the dual national's claim to U.S. Citizenship

                          http://japan.usembassy.gov/e/acs/tacs-7118.html

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by saechan View Post
                            ...
                            and you are also not understanding the term DUAL CITIZENSHIP. there is a loophole for biracial kids like me to keep both, because we consider ourselves both nationalities. Japanese government requires you to "try to forfeit US citizenship". they have no way to see if you have actually gotten rid of your us citizenship, especially since doing so is not easy for law abiding citizens. Therefore we have two passports, and two different addresses at all times. Therefore, not needing a visa which was the whole point of my question. if you cannot/do not understand the legality and complication to my situation please do not answer. thank you.
                            It is my understanding that you WILL be asked to choose/declare, eventually.

                            The "loophole" that you're describing depends on the whim of the people at the passport office when you are applying for renewal. At each extreme, they may (1) ask you to declare, or, (2) give you another passport that's valid for ten years.

                            As I said elsewhere, the younger you are when you get a J-passport, the better.

                            Also, FYI, there is a very specific question on the J-passport application that asks if you have another passport/citizenship. And given your situation, I wouldn't be surprised if the passport official asked you the same question verbally, for confirmation.

                            On that application my advice would be: Don't lie. Don't obfuscate. Don't hide/conceal. Besides losing any chance at J-citizenship/passport, there could be other very negative effects for your dreams in Japan.

                            Again, you're young, just get a J-passport in the next year or so and you'll be good for ten. Maybe something will have changed by the time that time comes around.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've met students in Japan who had permission to work, (I was a student in Japan and worked as well). If you have a Japanese passport you don't need a status of residence (aka Visa) and this is a big plus in the eyes of some employers because they don't have to do any additional paperwork. They could hire you and you could in theory start the same exact day because you have no immigration restrictions.
                              Last edited by themoonrules; 2013-08-17, 09:44 AM.

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